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5.0 out of 5 stars Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World
I enjoy all the Torchwood Books and Episodes. I found the story line was the usual intrigue and suspense throughout
Published 18 months ago by John Armstrong

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The weakest Miracle Day prequel
Book three of the Miracle Day prequels is certainly the weakest of the bunch. It focusses on the character of CIA agent Rex Matheson, and features none of the original Torchwood group except in passing. A CIA team have gone rogue with some alien technology and Rex takes it upon himself to track them down.

This is much more a return to some of the older...
Published on 24 Aug 2011 by J. R. Johnson-Rollings


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The weakest Miracle Day prequel, 24 Aug 2011
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J. R. Johnson-Rollings (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
Book three of the Miracle Day prequels is certainly the weakest of the bunch. It focusses on the character of CIA agent Rex Matheson, and features none of the original Torchwood group except in passing. A CIA team have gone rogue with some alien technology and Rex takes it upon himself to track them down.

This is much more a return to some of the older Torchwood dross novels than the recent set. It is very much a stand alone novel and seems too generic, as if it could have happened to anyone, rather than needing to be set in this established universe. As such, it comes across more as "let's tell a story about Rex" rather than "there's a story about Rex that needs to be told".

Generally, the characters are flat, and pretty identical. Even Rex doesn't come across as having any depth, which leaves him a pretty un-engaging main character. The plot itself is just a rehash of any number of 'soldiers go rogue' storylines, and the route Rex takes to find them seems far too easy. Speaking of Rex, his willingness and apparent ability to go off on his own little mission without any approval was unbelievable.

Overall, I have to say that I was not impressed by this book. Although there was an interesting twist at the end, it seemed a bit of a cop out and I can't help feeling that Rex's past could have been explored in a better way. Only really of interest to real Torchwood fans seeking completeness.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hungry for more..., 26 May 2013
This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
The second of the original novels written as a precursor to the (as of now) final TV series of Russell T Davies' Doctor Who spin-off doesn't actually feature any of the Torchwood cast who survived the various holocausts the show featured; even Captain Jack is in absentia. This makes the novel something of a strange animal - CIA agent Rex Matheson who was introduced in that final TV series, takes centre stage here, and becomes a kind of surrogate Torchwood, as a cache of extra-terrestrial weapons becomes the centre of some distinctly underhand governmental shenanigans, and Matheson finds himself chasing rogue army veterans and a shady sexagenarian assassin known only as Mr Wynter - a great creation who would undoubtedly be played by Christopher Walken if this were a film.

The story is engaging, violent and fast-paced, and Guy Adams is a controlled and effective writer, however it is quite `timey-wimey' to borrow a phrase, and the ending felt unsatisfactory to me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World, 10 Mar 2013
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John Armstrong "elvis.theking" (Bonnyrigg, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
I enjoy all the Torchwood Books and Episodes. I found the story line was the usual intrigue and suspense throughout
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 1 Oct 2011
This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
This isnt the best book i have read as i dont think that it kept me gripped until towards the end! But it had a good story line and had potential. The characters were set out well but the last 6 chapters were all titled "chapter 19" which was confusing and unnecessary as it just repeated the chapter 6 times but all from different perspectives, which got a bit tedious and i ended up skipping.
Out of the 3 newly released torchwood books i would rate them:
1st Favourite: First Born
2nd Favourite: Long Time Dead
3rd Favourite: The Men Who Sold The World :)
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brief but fun tie-in for fans, 24 Aug 2011
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Nick Brett (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
A Torchwood tie-in, the sort of thing I would normally avoid, but am enjoying the Miracle Day series and SFX Magazine recommended this, so.....

Set well before Miracle day, this features CIA agent Rex Matheson tracking down some rogue special forces operatives who have stolen a bunch of alien technology. It's a short book, only 250 pages of reasonably sized print so it is a quick and easy read. I was worried that this might be targeted at a younger audience, but there is some quite violent content so I would suggest not, just an easy and light adult read.

It has the Torchwood blend of outrageous plot, humour and shocking acts of violence. It captures the driven and grumpy Rex really well along with some interesting side characters including the creepy Mr Wynter And it's fun, plenty of action, banter and shadowy Government figures. Captain Jack and Gwen make very brief appearances, but this is about Rex and does a good job with him as he chases around the world chasing alien weaponry and being an accessory to stolen sunglasses.

The end of the book goes into paradoxical over-drive (at first I thought it was a printing error!) which is a little confusing, but if you enjoy Torchwood, you will probably like this brief but satisfying tie-in. Four stars if you are a Torchwood fan.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars torchwood novels, 13 Nov 2011
This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
product arrived on time in great condition,just what i wanted.Good price too! i usually buy from the supermarket but to br honest this was even cheaper and i got a few titles which i struggled to find in the shops.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars torchwood but not as we have seen it., 27 Oct 2011
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A. W. Gomm - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
just a book? wrong an adventure that twists and turns this should have been made in to T.V by now, all Captain Jack fans should read this and then ask for more
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The name's Matheson, Rex Matheson!, 5 Oct 2011
By 
Mr. K. Mahoney "Kevin Mahoney" (Punked Books, London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World (Paperback)
This is a hugely enjoyable prequel to Torchwood Miracle Day, starring everyone's favourite CIA agent Rex Matheson. The rather explosive opening involves Rex somehow being transported back in time to prehistory. Much like the most recent series of Steven Moffat's Doctor Who, this opening is very redolent of that time honoured question: "How the hell does he get out of that one?" I mean, after all, the Rex Matheson we first meet in Miracle Day, although he's world-weary, he's not as world-weary as this premise would seem to suggest that he is. (Thus, unbeknownst to Rex, he did come across Torchwood prior to the events of Miracle Day.) Having written that, Rex doesn't encounter Torchwood proper, rather it's the detritus of Torchwood that makes him come a cropper, as the cash-strapped British government,ever keen to pay off their (our) debts, arrange to sell off a few weapons that they found in the wreck of the Torchwood hub to the Americans.

Due to an unfortunate accident during this transaction, the potential of these alien weapons becomes all too clear to Cotter Gleason, the CIA special ops agent placed in charge of their procurement. After a bloody gun battle with the Brits, Gleason and his team go rogue, intent on holding the world to ransom with a Ytraxorian Reality Rifle... This semi-organic gun is rather more subtle than say, your average Sontaran weaponry, but no less devastating for that.

Having let his morals bloodily get in the way of a previous assignment, Rex is in some dire need of a result, and as he's in close proximity to Gleason's Cuban base, he's sent on the chase... However, Rex is not the only hunter in this world, as the sinister Mr. Wynter is also after Gleason...

Guy Adams' prose here isn't all that elegant, but then it doesn't need to be, especially as this high octane thriller very much suits Rex's voice (so it's great to experience his buddy banter with Shaeffer, and with a certain CIA watch analyst named Esther Drummond...). Rex is his usual witty self, and there's also some other great humour in the novel, especially with regards to the cheeky cameo of a politician who's not unlike a certain Nick Clegg... We do truly see Rex in all his glory here (although I do think that he could have been a bit faster on the uptake with regards to the resolution). Speaking of the resolution, I thought for a moment that it had gone completely wrong, or that there was a book production error. Fortunately for Guy Adams, his target audience will probably be accustomed to such tricks if they're also readers of the current Doctor Who book range. Guy Adams has a great track history of writing quality books about cult TV shows, with a previous Torchwood novel (The House That Jack Built) amongst his various works. Guy Adams' representation of America is truly authentic, as is his depiction of tough action heroes. Indeed, I'd go as far as saying that The Men Who Sold the World is a more complete work than Miracle Day itself. If the TV series isn't renewed, then Torchwood could have an even better future in book-form, if this novel and Sarah Pinborough's Long Time Dead are anything to go by. If Russell T Davies were to be a bit more ambitious though, then The Men Who Sold the World would undoubtedly make an excellent Bond-style movie.
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Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World
Torchwood: The Men Who Sold The World by Guy Adams (Paperback - 18 Aug 2011)
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