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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 11 March 2012
Hmm, not sure what to make of this book - written for the thirty-fifth anniversary of Doctor Who, so published in 1998, I know that's quite a few years ago - so pre-the 1996 Paul McGann ninth Doctor movie, but pre-any of the current TV series. So, bearing that in mind, what does a reader who is familiar with Doctor Who make of it?

To start with, precisely WHICH Doctor is being written about in this book (or is there more than one in the various timeframes?) is never made clear. While a clever writing strategy, it actually backfires (in my opinion) because there is never room for the Doctor to be characterised - his particular personality, which in each incarnation really is quite unique, is never allowed to break through into the characterisation in this novel. And that's a shame.

Secondly, although much of the book is set on Gallifrey (which is a great plus for any Doctor Who fan), it seems the author never really took the opportunity to make the most of this setting. The characters, the places, the culture of Gallifrey never really gets out into the open. Again, that's a shame.

And the story? Well, to be honest, I found it all a bit confusing. I get the premise; I get the threads with the "ancient enemies", the time travel, the cunning plans of Rassilon, the ancient Timelord plots - but does it all hang together? Not really. It's not really a good Doctor Who story; and it's not really a good science fiction story. Great premise; unfortunate delivery.
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on 26 January 1999
Having written the first cross-over New Adventure (Cold Fusion) Lance has written the most unique Doctor Who book ever. This isn't an eighth Doctor novel, or a first, or an anything-th, this is a story of what might have been. While still being "Who"-ish, it manages to conjour up a whole new world for the Doctor. It's not explained why he is where he is, or when it is, and there are no references to all the nice little things from his past, such as companions or old enemies. This is a fascinating look at where things might be if a different direction had been taken during the 80s, or if it had not been cancelled, or if the Movie had led to a series. Don't expect this book to fit neatly into any chronology so far written, even Lance's own impressive "A History of the Universe", it's to be taken as a celebration of everything The Doctor has been, is, and may be in the future.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 24 October 2013
Hmm, not sure what to make of this book - written for the thirty-fifth anniversary of Doctor Who, so published in 1998, I know that's quite a few years ago - so pre-the 1996 Paul McGann ninth Doctor movie, but pre-any of the current TV series. So, bearing that in mind, what does a reader who is familiar with Doctor Who make of it?

To start with, precisely WHICH Doctor is being written about in this book (or is there more than one in the various timeframes?) is never made clear. While a clever writing strategy, it actually backfires (in my opinion) because there is never room for the Doctor to be characterised - his particular personality, which in each incarnation really is quite unique, is never allowed to break through into the characterisation in this novel. And that's a shame.

Secondly, although much of the book is set on Gallifrey (which is a great plus for any Doctor Who fan), it seems the author never really took the opportunity to make the most of this setting. The characters, the places, the culture of Gallifrey never really gets out into the open. Again, that's a shame.

And the story? Well, to be honest, I found it all a bit confusing. I get the premise; I get the threads with the "ancient enemies", the time travel, the cunning plans of Rassilon, the ancient Timelord plots - but does it all hang together? Not really. It's not really a good Doctor Who story; and it's not really a good science fiction story. Great premise; unfortunate delivery.
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on 9 June 2000
This is one of the most entertaining Doctor Who books I have ever read, despite the fact that I'm not really sure what it's all about. It's best read if you just accept what has been written without trying to fit it into established continuity
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on 10 July 2012
`The Infinity Doctors' is a peculiar read. The novel is deliberately ambiguous as to which incarnation of the Doctor features. However, this is beside the point. The novel isn't supposed to fit into any sort of continuity - it is written in the spirit of continuity.

Throughout the novel, Lance Parkin reinterprets and re-envisions concepts and characters from the show's history, presenting a complex and captivating read from the start. The novel is pastiche, yet it is brimming with originality and subtlety. It ostensibly alludes to `the Cartmel Masterplan' with "the little man" in the prologue, yet constantly defies attempts to categorise its narrative within preceding continuity.

Full of memorable characters, fascinating concepts, and stunning imagery, `The Infinity Doctors' comes as a highly recommended read.
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on 15 July 2012
Not a book for the casual reader, this was published to celebrate the thirty-fifth anniversary of the show, at a time when it was off the air. Fans have tried desperately to squeeze this into continuity, but it's perhaps best thought of as an alternate 'what if?' story. The Doctor's incarnation is deliberately undefined, and to be honest is a poor match for any of the eight candidates that existed at the time it was written, yet he remains the essence of the Doctor, the character distilled, free of the quirks imposed by various actors. Despite being loaded with nods and nudges acknowledging the long history of the series, this makes the book a credible standalone novel, a mystery set on a distant world in chaos. It's a very strong novel, in that regard.
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on 12 November 2013
The Infinity Doctors is a Past Doctor Adventure featuring the Doctor. No idea which as Lance Parkin has deliberately left this ambiguous. Fan rumours have set this as a pre-Unearthly Child Hartnell, a novel featuring The Other or a late McGann era book. Parkin himself has apparently alluded to the latter in Father Time, and in his own guide to Doctor Who chronology, setting The Infinity Doctors after The Gallifrey Chronicles.

The story of The Infinity Doctors is primarily a Gallifrey lore one, albeit one which may or may not be happening in current continuity. It focuses on the Doctor, now part of the Council on Gallifrey, playing peacekeeper in a war between the Rutan and the Sontarans whilst an artefact near the very end of time threatens to destroy all life throughout the universe and time itself.

The Infinity Doctors contains a lot of science fact and fiction. We are treated to astronomy, psychics and time travel theory, some of it a little heavy going at times and I did find myself skimming those bits a little. All of it is very well written though, and it's always better to have things explained, rather than just left for us to assume.

Whilst a nice idea the lack of solidity in the time frame just serves to confuse matters and really puts a dampener on things if continuity and Gallifreyan history is your thing. Yes you can view The Infinity Doctors as a big "what if?" but it's nice to have some sort of clarity, especially as Parkin creates a startlingly good representation of Gallifrey and goes on to write the pivotal The Gallifrey Chronicles. A few tweaks to the time frame and a definite McGann Doctor would have made this novel complete. That said if you are able to leave your annoyances with continuity at the door and accept it for what it is, The Infinity Doctors is a very well written piece of work which rewards loyal fans of the series. Casual fans might find it a little much though.
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on 26 November 1998
As an avid reader of the Doctor Who books, I found this somewhat confusing as to exactly which time frame I was in (this might be me missing something rather than lacking in the book!). I found little bits of all the Doctors there (in varying portions). Overall I liked it, but felt it generated more questions than it gave answers to. It adds to the Doctor's mystery.
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on 14 March 1999
This is not a run of the mill Doctor Who book-let's get that straight. If you are going to buy only one DW book then this is it.The Doctor's character is superbly depicted because there are no confines of a particular Doctor. This is well worth the read.
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on 26 June 2000
A superb tour de force, this is the only Dr Who novel that I've ever felt compelled to read through from start to finish in one sitting and its best feature is that it pays only subtle and tangential homage to the tangled and increasingly tedious continuity of the Dr Who tv series and films. This book demonstrates that you can wipe the slate nearly clean and still create a fascinating mystique within the pages of a single volume, something the scriptwriters of the tv series could have done with learning long before the series' demise. This should....MUST....be the Shape of Things to Come. The Doctor is dead, long live the Doctor.
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