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80 Reviews
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite the most inspiring book!
This is a truly inspiring book!
It is not just a book about "the man that cut his arm off", it's a book about life, friends, family, the wilderness, adventure, climbing, snow sports, biology, disability, spirituality, and the media's reaction to one man's experience.
Aaron's reflections on his life as he experienced them over his time in the canyon works very...
Published on 18 Aug 2005 by Peter Ashley

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hard reading
If this book was cut down to a third of it's size I would give it 5 but in it's current state it would scrape a 3. I enjoyed the actual account of his entrapment and how he managed to keep alert and solve his problem.I think he is a very strong person mentally and this shines through in the book,giving an important message of we do what we believe we can do.However the...
Published on 10 Feb 2011 by Keri


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite the most inspiring book!, 18 Aug 2005
This is a truly inspiring book!
It is not just a book about "the man that cut his arm off", it's a book about life, friends, family, the wilderness, adventure, climbing, snow sports, biology, disability, spirituality, and the media's reaction to one man's experience.
Aaron's reflections on his life as he experienced them over his time in the canyon works very well as a narrative device to keep the tension whilst exploring his thoughts. His exit from the boulder, despite being built-up for so long, is not a disappointment and will have you crying out-loud in anguish!
Like many adventure disaster stories, Aaron's experience can be seen as bad planning - he went out on his own in the middle of nowhere an left no useful record of his intentions. Unlike many such works, he accepts this fact from the beginning and explores the implications throughout the book. He has an endearing ability to simply recount events, thoughts and emotions, inspiring the reader to ponder the implications.
Throughout the book the way aaron's brain works is quite amazing. His ability to reason through his predicament and tirelessly work through problems is truly fascinating.
What was unexpected for me (and, I think, for Aaron) are the spiritual experiences that add so much to the tale.
Everyone should read this book!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A can't put it down kinda book, 20 Oct 2006
At first I was a little put off reading the book as I thought that Aron came over as arrogant and really full of himself.

However when you get to the nub of his dilemma and start thinking about what would you do in that situation you soon realise what a brave guy he was. Stranded miles for anywhere with no one knowing his whereabouts he had to summon real fortitude to cut off his own arm plus have the unnerring faith that he would get out alive.

Hats off to him. A stonking good read. If you like Joe Simpson's touching the void you'll like this.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just When You Think You've Had a Bad Day..., 21 Oct 2004
By A Customer
This is a pretty mind-blowing story. The chapters about his ordeal are intersperced with stories about previous death-defying adventures including avalanches and blinding snowstorms. This was a very honest and unvarnished account of what Aron Ralston went through, and as such it is very powerful. I had to keep looking at his photo on the cover to reassure myself that he lived!! It helps put life into perspective, a little, and I highly recommend it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hard reading, 10 Feb 2011
If this book was cut down to a third of it's size I would give it 5 but in it's current state it would scrape a 3. I enjoyed the actual account of his entrapment and how he managed to keep alert and solve his problem.I think he is a very strong person mentally and this shines through in the book,giving an important message of we do what we believe we can do.However the other bits of the book with long descriptions of previous foolhardy trips and detailed technical facts for how he climbed,used ropes etc I found almost sent me to sleep.If these bits,well 2 thirds of the book were cut out I would recommend that you buy it to read. As it is it would be best to borrow it from a library so you don't waste your money.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much more to this then you might think., 30 Dec 2006
I received this book as a Christmas present and wasn't sure about how I would find the read. It didn't take long before I was fully engaged in the story.

It was really interesting to discover just how much climbing experience Aron Ralston has. This experience clearly saved his life when it really counted. The main theme is broken up well with stories of his climbing past. Readers are easily able to live side-by-side with Aron as he describes the accident and the days that followed. The text is supplemented with a good photo section.

This was a very well written book that evoked many different emotions. It comes highly recommended to all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Takes Time but worth it, 31 May 2005
Had trouble at the start of this book reading all the accompanying chapters. He wanders around with his life experiences quite a bit, using these to put the ordeal in perspective, and I am certain, to bolster the book out a bit, after all how much can You say about having your hand stuck and staring at a sandstone wall for 10 days. BUT, when he started with the point of the book, e.g. the hand cutting incident, I found myself looking away and wincing. Definitely worth the read, exceptional courage and ensure you have a strong stomach.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not a climbing fan, but couldn't put this down, 1 May 2008
By 
Mr. N. Hepplewhite "N Hepplewhite" (Newcastle, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I am not a fan of climbing at all, but heard a brief amount about this story and decided to get it - I was not disappointed. Unlike some of the more negative reviews I found the explanations of climbing terminology and processes easy to understand and quite straight to the point.

The book avoids filling spaces with waffle and useless snippets just to fill pages and had me gripped from start to finish. A really brave man, who had to use all of his skill and then all of his courage.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars engaging, invigorating but lacked something, 4 Feb 2011
By 
This review is from: 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place (Paperback)
I read this book in three days. After seeing the film I really wanted to get a better insight into the authors life and understand what type of man it would take to cut of his own arm. I understand why the previous reviewer has given this book three stars as I agree that some of the climbing lingo and his descriptions are difficult to follow especially for those of us who are not enthusiastic as the author is. I didn't always understand what he was describing and found it difficult to picture what he was doing, phrases like cornice, couloir, crampons, DPS, ECSO, ICS, Lexan and many others kept popping up and I had no idea what they meant. However, when I reached the end of the book and saw there was a glossary, I wish I would've known this before GODDAMIT!

Still, the best parts of the book are his accounts of being stuck in Blue John Canyon and his sharing of his thoughts and worries which reach a maximum level of intensity. He had to drink his own urine too and watch his right hand decompose in front of him. I found the most interesting part his hullucinations, his near death experience and preminitions which I wished he could've expounded on. I found it somewhat different to the film and some of the biographical stories tend to break up the tension in which the film had displayed and demonstrated. Some of the other stories are interesting, such as the one when he gets chased by bear, which I found rather amusing. however, the other biographical details were no where as intense as the 127 hours in which he was stuck in that canyon.

I liked the fact that he had been reborn had found a sense of spiritualality and had reflected on his whole life to realize the selfishness and pain he had inflicted on others. I think he should've written more about that, as I think that lesson was really what was at the heart of the book. It is this idea that he was stuck in this canyon for a reason, to escape fear and achieve a higher state of consciousness-a knowing that he is more than just a body! I think this message should've been emphasized more, but apart from that I really enjoyed it and I also highly recommend that you go and see the film!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beating The Odds, 5 Nov 2004
By A Customer
This is one man that knows what beating the odds is all about. He has been close to death, yet, his courage and determination to survive is remarkable. He writes with poetic justice and you can almost see the scenerios he paints. Highly rated!
Other good books to read are: Skywriting,If I Knew Then and Nightmares Echo
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 14 Jun 2007
By 
Spider Monkey (UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book is part autobiography and part survival story and you can't help but be inspired by both aspects. This book is written so well you get sucked in in the first few pages and hold on with Aron through all the trials until the very end. It isn't easy to read when he gets to the more graphic parts in places, but it is an incredible story and an excellent book.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston (Paperback - 9 Dec 2010)
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