Customer Reviews


9 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This excellent catalogue should perhaps be read before viewing the exhibition
Until now I have been rather disappointed by the work of Paul Klee - and disappointed in myself for not understanding his work better; clearly he was inventive and a marvelous colourist but what was his work about? He seemed to have so many ideas fizzing around in his head that he was always flitting about, here and there, never staying long enough to facilitate...
Published 9 months ago by Dr R

versus
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Visually poor
I went to see this exhibition and bought the catalogue afterwards from Amazon as it was a few pounds cheaper than in the gift shop at the Tate Modern. Although the content is interesting for anybody wishing to know more about the life and work of this wonderful artist, the reproductions of the artwork are disappointing. The pictures are much darker than the originals and...
Published 6 months ago by illustrani


Most Helpful First | Newest First

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This excellent catalogue should perhaps be read before viewing the exhibition, 26 Oct 2013
By 
Dr R (Norwich, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The EY Exhibition - Paul Klee: Making Visible (Hardcover)
Until now I have been rather disappointed by the work of Paul Klee - and disappointed in myself for not understanding his work better; clearly he was inventive and a marvelous colourist but what was his work about? He seemed to have so many ideas fizzing around in his head that he was always flitting about, here and there, never staying long enough to facilitate understanding; a real `Jack of all Trades' with the negative connotations that this title brings. The catalogue for the 2013-14 exhibition "Paul Klee Making Visible" at Tate Modern has, I think, opened my eyes and my mind.

The exhibition shows some 130 works from the period 1912-1940. In the former year the artist joined Der Blaue Reiter and, more importantly, visited Paris and met Robert Delaunay who was seeking to integrate the bright colouring of the Fauves and abstraction, a synthesis later described as Orphism. At this time, a decade after completing his training in Munich, the artist was struggling to find his artistic style and was unable to earn a living from his art, having to work as a violinist and music critic as well as relying on the income that his wife earned from piano lessons. In the latter year Klee died, ravaged by scleroderma and in intense pain, but he was still able to produce 1,253 works in 1939, and over 10,000 extant works in all.

The catalogue is introduced by an essay "Carefully ordered confusion", by the Curator, Matthew Gale, followed by chronologically-arranged sections, covering approximate 5 year periods, each containing an introductory essay, a critical assessment of the major works and an illustrated Chronology, 1879-1914: "An Art of Privacy? Wilhelm Hausenstein on Paul Klee" by Annie Bourneuf; 1915-1920: "Ambitions, Anxieties and Attainments: Paul Klee and the Bauhaus", by Anja Baumhoff; 1921-1924: "Square/Fish" by Matthew Gale; 1925-1930: "'The peaceful character of compromise': Paul Klee's `so-called pointillism'" and 1931-1935: Work Processes and Retrospection" by Flavia Frigeri. For the final period, 1936-1940, a Chronology alone is presented. Each section also contains a description by Gale of a major exhibition at which Klee's work was shown in his lifetime, Munich in 1920; Berlin, 1923; New York, 1930; Berne, 1935, and Zurich, 1940. I found this structure made the analysis of the artist's development, his picking up of earlier motifs and styles, and his borrowings and rejections, much easier to follow than has been the case in other works on the artist.

Klee's short visit to Tunisia in 1914 with the soon-to-be-dead Macke and Moilliet, who seems to have disappeared without trace is put into the wider context of his artistic exploration. Contrary to received opinion, Klee's work was already suffused with primary colours, "The Hotel", "Plants in the Mountains" and "Flower Bed", all 1913, although this was certainly heightened by the visit, "Opened Mountain", and "Green X Above Left", both 1914.

Klee's comment `I begin where all pictorial form begins: with a point that sets itself in motion' is evident time and time again in the catalogue, as is his humour, and these are amongst the reasons that his works are so readily accepted by children. It is how they draw and colour, ending up goodness knows where. Again, `A line comes into being, so to speak, it goes for a walk, aimlessly, for the sake of the walk.' In this catalogue the walk is certainly worth making although how it will be organised at Tate Modern remains to be seen.

In 1930-31, the artist reworking pointillism in his own terms. Not only did these works evolve during this period, from part of an overall cagework, "Hovering", 1930, through "Castle Garden", 1931 that has strong memories of Seurat, to "Polyphony, 1932", where the pointillist dots are superimposed over a geometric framework. What is amazing is that, according to the catalogue, the artist developed this time-consuming series at the same time that he was pursuing other styles. Over and over again one sees evidence of the artist's ability to use very different styles, palettes and hues in parallel.

It is clear from this catalogue that the artist's illness and constant pain is absent from the work in his last year/s. Instead we find works such as the shimmering "Blue Night", 1937, "Park near Lu", "Forest Witches" and "Rich Harbour", all from 1938, in which a series of curved thickly painted lines are given different meaning by the colours and shapes of the background. The same year, two lone dots stare out from "Le Rouge et le Noir", whilst in 1939 the Cubist "Portrait Bust of Gaia" also stares out of a canvas dominated by browns and dull greens. These works demonstrate that he was as innovative as ever, with ideas, including a focus on childhood, that would clearly be added to his further work had the artist lived. Remarkably, in this final year he completed 366 works that are only rarely sketches or doodles.

So often I was surprised by the artist's parallel working, the contrast between the colours, sombre in "Landscape with Flags" but jewel bright in "Medieval Town", both from 1915; the figurative "Angelus Novus," 1920, looking like an old sepia photograph, and "Redgreen and Violet-Yellow Rhythms", with blocks of coordinated colour and superimposed fir trees, both from 1920, or from 1927 the wandering line in "Once More Bewitched Down to the Ground" and "Traps", with its opened stage curtains revealing slightly threatening shapes which had been used earlier in "Exotic River Landscape" and "Analysis of Diverse Perversities", both from1922. Because the artist was so meticulous about recording his works it is possible to know just how close in time individual works were completed. In "Above Mountain Summit", 1917, Klee places a cross just below the summit, clearly looking back to Caspar David Friedrich.

The inexhaustible joy of the artist right to the end can be seen in his Cubist "Portrait Bust of Gaia", 1939, in both the dark palette of "Diagram of Flight", 1939, and the optimistic colouration of "Twilight Flowers", 1940, in the jewelled boxes of "Glass Fašade", 1940, and especially in "Untitled (The Last Still Life)", 1940, which brings back elements from earlier work. In a letter to his son, Klee recognised the uncontrollable pressure he felt trying to develop his ideas before he died, `I can no longer keep up with these children of mine. They run away with me.'

This is an excellent catalogue that will repay reading and re-reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars READ THE CAT, GO SEE THE EXHIB, 20 Dec 2013
By 
Malcolm MacINTYRE-READ "themacmac" (Much Wenlock, Shropshire, U.K.) - See all my reviews
I have loved Paul KLEE's work ever since I was introduced to it by our art master in my first year of grammar school back in 1956.

The exhibition is one of the most comprehensive records of an artist's lifetime's work that I have seen and consider the catalogue to be an excellent record of the show and its included items. I was amazed to see that all of his work is so much smaller than they had previously appeared to be in book illustrations. Made an even greater impact when seen in context.

Unfortunately, I could not afford the on-site price so am delighted to have found it now at one I can just about squeeze to. It will be a lasting reminder for me of a wonderful experience in Tate Modern, for which many thanks to its organisers and curators.

Go on. Enjoy yourself. Agree with the previous comment that the show will be even more appreciated by reading this excellent background first. It finishes on 9 March 2014.

If you are reading this after 9 March 2014, this publication will offer the closest you can now get to enjoy Paul KLEE's oeuvre for many years to come, if ever in most people's lifetimes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, especially if you missed the exhibition, 4 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Beautifully printed and illustrated. Unfortunately we did not make the exhibition but as I have seen Paul Klee's work in the past it didn't really matter this book is a lasting reminder.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Visually poor, 8 Jan 2014
By 
illustrani (Tenerife, Canary Is.) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I went to see this exhibition and bought the catalogue afterwards from Amazon as it was a few pounds cheaper than in the gift shop at the Tate Modern. Although the content is interesting for anybody wishing to know more about the life and work of this wonderful artist, the reproductions of the artwork are disappointing. The pictures are much darker than the originals and many are very small indeed, in fact my students, who have not seen the original work, were not very impressed at all by the artwork as these pictures do not do any justice to the originals which are vibrant and enigmatic. If you want a book of reproductions of Paul Klee's work, do not buy this book. There are much better examples on the market.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Klee Glee, 21 Mar 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Excellent book / catalogue about a marvellous artist. Interesting text and well illustrated. I have a collection of books about Klee - this is a welcome addition - there is always more to discover about him and his work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars one of the best book for Paul Klee, 4 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
well summarized for the exhibition as well as his works.
absolutely valuable to have one. you will never regret at all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Good souvenir, 18 Feb 2014
By 
P. Collins (Galashiels, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I am not usually a modern art fan but this exhibition was excellent and the book is very informative and a good reminder
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pail Klee, 5 April 2014
By 
Rene (Stevenage, Herts United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As an avid enthusiast of Paul Klee who was unable to get to the exhibition this book was a good substitution. He was a real original.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The recipient was overjoyed and will attend the Paul Klee exhibition in the ..., 26 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The EY Exhibition - Paul Klee: Making Visible (Hardcover)
This book was bought as a birthday present. The recipient was overjoyed and will attend the Paul Klee exhibition in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The EY Exhibition - Paul Klee: Making Visible
The EY Exhibition - Paul Klee: Making Visible by Matthew Gale (Hardcover - 3 Oct 2013)
Out of stock
Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews