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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too good to miss
Whilst there are readers out there that feel that the Fantasy and 40K worlds are just one convoluted Boy story warfare this title by John French goes to prove that there are so many other things out there for the readers to not only discover but demonstrates that the universe can be stranger than even they can imagine.

The story is beautifully written, the...
Published 23 months ago by Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but a bit slow.
I found this book interesting but ultimately somewhat heavy going. It does work as a continuation of the fantastic HH era Thousand Sons story and for a picture of Ahriman for the first millenia (or two?) after the Heresy, but I must confess I didn't really enjoy it that much. I'm not wholly sure why it failed to thrill me, but I think that it had to do with the fact that...
Published 20 months ago by Mr. Adam G. France


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Too good to miss, 24 Jun. 2013
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
Whilst there are readers out there that feel that the Fantasy and 40K worlds are just one convoluted Boy story warfare this title by John French goes to prove that there are so many other things out there for the readers to not only discover but demonstrates that the universe can be stranger than even they can imagine.

The story is beautifully written, the prose wonderfully diverse and when added to an overall arc that keeps you guessing at what is to come (even though the characters know the history of some events) the reader is presented with a book that really will leave you gasping at what the author has to unveil. Its unlike anything that's gone before and definitely a debut that will have readers demanding more by the author. Great stuff all round and I really can't wait to see what John will bring for the second part of this trilogy.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The hopeful renegade, 23 Jun. 2013
By 
JPS - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
This could perhaps have been an alternate title for the book. Ahriman, once the Chief Librarian of the Thousand Sons, lives hidden, in exile and racked by remorse and guilt as part of a war band of Traitor Space Marines. Contrary to what the "blurb" on the back cover of the book suggests, he is not at all "ever scheming" and "plotting his return to power". Rather, he, like other self-exiled Thousand Sons, is being hunted and he is initially quite unaware of it.

In fact, and this is one of the strongest point's of John French's book, he is beset by the sense of his failure to cure the Thousand Sons and for having betrayed their faith in him. It is this sense of guilt which made him abandon his powers. It is the same feelings, which is largely similar to the feelings experienced by Talos of the Night Lords (Aaron Demski-Bowden - ADB) which made him human, almost sympathetic and a rather credible character. Just like Talos, Ahriman has a dream and is a believer. Despite everything that has gone wrong, little by little, he refuses that his Legion is doomed to destruction and will never rise again and it is this depiction of character that I found most remarkable.

Several of the other characters are also very interesting. One is Carmenta, mistress of the Blood Crescent, and the sole survivor of a heretical tech clan. Others are three surviving Space Marines, the last of their Chapter, who cling to their oaths although these have already been broken in the past, and who fight for survival but have little to believe in anymore.

Then there are the sorcerers of the Thousand Sons and their encounters with Ahriman, who used to be the most powerful of them and their former teacher, which will bring some nice fights across the warp. Also, and since the story takes place close to the Eye of Terror, you can expect a few interesting daemons as well.

I'll refrain from mentioning anything more, to avoid spoilers, and will only add that I highly recommend this book, which seems to be the first of a series but does not break of in an artificial way as so many others do. While not quite as good as ADB's Night Lord Trilogy (or Graham McNeil's "A Thousand Sons", for that matter), this one is very close behind and worth a solid four stars.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but a bit slow., 8 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
I found this book interesting but ultimately somewhat heavy going. It does work as a continuation of the fantastic HH era Thousand Sons story and for a picture of Ahriman for the first millenia (or two?) after the Heresy, but I must confess I didn't really enjoy it that much. I'm not wholly sure why it failed to thrill me, but I think that it had to do with the fact that Ahriman himself is quite subdued as a character for a lot of the novel and the actual plot is rather slow.

I did like the idea of Ahriman hiding out under a false identity with other weaker Chaos warbands, sort of like a 40K-Nazi war criminal, and his handful of Astartes renegade allies later in the book are intriguing - especially as by the end of this first novel in a series we have yet to learn which Chapter they hail from. The heretek ship's commander is also a well drawn and imaginative character.

There are some great scenes, such as when Ahriman first cuts loose with the warpcraft powers he has been suppressing for years, and later when he conducts a ritual summoning of a daemon. Also the fact Ahriman is shown as quite sympathetic is handled well, at least in his aims to try to correct what he has previously done. However, the main plot, concentrating around some of the surviving Thousand Sons sorcerers trying to track him down, felt somewhat flat and uninspired to me.

It's well worth a read but, as I say, for me it didn't quite lift off dramatically and by the end it felt rather plodding.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The future looks bright, 8 Oct. 2013
By 
M. F. Edwards "xbumble" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
I had just finished reading 'A Thousand Sons' from the Horus Heresy when I came across this book in Waterstones. Being a Chaos SM player it was a must buy.

When I got home and opened it up, the font size was double that of normal Black Library books and it seems they have upped the size of the type to give the impression the book is bigger than it actually is, thus justifying the £8.99 price tag.

Once I read the book though, none of that mattered.

The book is superbly written, conveying the hauntingly dark and complex world that Ahriman has made for himself.

This book captures you from the minute you start reading, and John's narrative is very evocative as he weaves multi-faceted layers of description and prose.

Though not as dark and uncomfortable to read as say Graham McNeill's 'Fulgrim' (another truly superb book, and a must read - however unpleasant it gets!), it is delicious in it's delivery of all things Chaos, and the true ramifications of those who choose to dwell within it.

I truly hope that John French gets given a more prominent position as a Black Library author - he fully deserves it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Ahriman rediscovered..., 6 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
Character development was everything in this book for me. I'd never really thought that deeply about Ahriman before, he's always been represented as a pretty flat character driven on his relentless quest to gather artefacts for his grand plan. But John totally changed that for me and I'll never think of the character in the same way again. Instead we get the Ahriman who is wracked by guilt about what he did to his chapter, who still doesn't even understand why the Emperor turned on them. He's filled with remorse, blocking the world away and living a life in hiding. But the Thousand Sons haven't forgotten about Ahriman, the traitor, the destroyer who they want to hunt down. Looking forward to the next instalment!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly Dissapointed, 9 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
Ahriman and the Thousands Sons are favourites of mine so I was keen to read this.
The story is good but very much like the Horus Heresy series alludes that its is going to reveal lots of facts about the history of Ahriman and The Thousand Sons but in the end leaves you tantalised but not really fulfilled.
I feel the ending could have been better.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ahriman, 30 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
What else to day. Ahriman, is one of the best "bad" guys in 40K.

But "bad" depends on the point of view. Trying to survive against all odds, taking no prisoners, does make you bad?
Great book, with an open conclusion that asks for sequel ASAP.

If you are on 40K worth.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting..., 22 Sept. 2013
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A worthy follow up to A Thousand Sons, it begins to explain how Ahriman became the threat to sentient life that he is, and what became of the Thousand Sons after Prospero. Interesting backstory, lots of sorcery - good stuff.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable, 2 May 2014
This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
I am often reluctant to buy black library books from authors I am unfamiliar with. I purchased this on a whim and really enjoyed the depth of character and overall storyline. Looking forward to more in the future.
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5.0 out of 5 stars cant wait for book two, 20 Aug. 2013
This review is from: Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) (Paperback)
I love anything thousand sons, such an under used legion, well this book was not what I expected but was excellent, pleased it's a three parter.
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Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000)
Ahriman: Exile (Warhammer 40000) by John French (Paperback - 20 Jun. 2013)
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