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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It is a good book - but not a fully likeable one
To start with - my credentials. I own all but four of the Warhammer books - Fantasy + 40K. My favourite Space Marin Battles story was Battle of the Fang, for it's story telling - also by Chris Wraight, with my recent read being Legion of the Damned; being my favourite Space Marine Battles story for capturing the heart of what the battlefield for such warriors of the...
Published on 30 Jun 2012 by Z

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What a dissapointment
Not at all sure what went wrong here, Chris Wraight has done some of the best BL novels to come out in ages, he's right up their with Dan and Aaron as far as im concerned, but Wrath of Iron was just such a let down. There was none of the glorious exploration of a space marine chapter as in Battle of the fang, or any of the interesting characters we find in his warhammer...
Published on 27 July 2012 by Dazzo


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It is a good book - but not a fully likeable one, 30 Jun 2012
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To start with - my credentials. I own all but four of the Warhammer books - Fantasy + 40K. My favourite Space Marin Battles story was Battle of the Fang, for it's story telling - also by Chris Wraight, with my recent read being Legion of the Damned; being my favourite Space Marine Battles story for capturing the heart of what the battlefield for such warriors of the Imperium is like. So you see, Chris Wraight already set the standards of Space Marine Battles (the other Battle of the Space Marines are mostly very close in quality but not any where up to his standards - The Gildar Rift being one of the better ones along with Helsreach).

Wraight is a good writer with a bright future with the Black Library, his style is assessable but suitably immersion and he is excellent at understanding the minds of who he writes about. That is what makes his approach to story telling in Wrath of Iron great. He doesn't keep you locked in the viewpoint of the Space Marines - allowing you to appreciate more of the 'battle field'. This is very useful and in his favour considering his subject matter for this novel. This is because the Iron Hand are what they think themselves quietly - efficient, loyal Astartes, great warriors, but most importantly monsters. The opening of this book - written by their Primarch was the best part of the book for it really captured for me the image and message of the chapter. All of the facets mentioned above; of the Iron Hands, is linked to their mechanisation + belief in their technology. As they gain 'power' they lose 'humanity' which makes their viewpoint boring + difficult to enjoy reading. However that is who they are. Wraight stays true to who they are, what they are + where/how they came to be who they are. This makes my dislike of following them unfair in the regard that I as a reader wasn't expecting such a loyal rendition of their 'efficient' image, but also don't enjoy reading about what amounted to many conversions + behaviours on their part that where there mostly to say they were in the book - that is not to say I argue they aren't bloody effective.

Therefore it is when Wraight moves to the perspective of the Militant Imperial Lord General - for half the book - who co-commands the crusade and the retaking of the world the books is set upon - with his great disdain for the tactics and behaviours of the Iron Hands that you start to feel the story come alive; because he voices what you think when you read about the Iron Hands. As a result, it is wrong to say the Iron Hands are the 'main characters' as they by definition seeking to to shred all emotions and acts that would define their characters other than as killer automations.

I give the book 4/5 for what it sets out to do, as well as how much fun it is to read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No real Heroes, 13 July 2012
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JPS - See all my reviews
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This is indeed the 10th volume of the Space Marine Battles Novel. It is original in several ways, but also not original at all in others.

One of my first reactions was that, yet again, and just like Angel of Fire, this book was about an Imperial army spearheaded by Space Marines that attacks a planet corrupted by Chaos and seeks to reclaim it for the Empire of Mankind. Yet again, they make planet fall and attack the main and huge city of the planet, here called Shardenus Prime.

However, there is where the parallel stops. Instead of being commanded by Lord Macharius, the undisputed leader of the Imperial Army, the commander is Rauth, Captain of Clan Raukaan of the Iron Hands. The imperial Guard and their commanders are under their orders, and somewhat resentful because of the way the Iron Hand commander uses them in a rather callous way without bothering to explain his decisions and the threats that they are facing.

The originality, however, is that the Iron Hands, despite their valor, are depicted in a way that makes them hardly sympathetic. Sympathy, approval or any human feelings, seem to be almost totally absent from their behavior. Rauth and his brothers simply do not care for humans who are there to be used as canon fodder, freeing up the Iron Hands to accomplish what the others cannot do.

Another interesting feature which, while not original, is nevertheless well done, is to tell the story from multiple perspectives. We have that of the Iron Hands, but also that of the Mechanicum with the interesting character of the "female" (to the extent that such a term means anything for a Magos) Magos Ys, of the Titan Princeps, of Nehata, the Lord Commander of the Imperial Guard and of Heriat, the General-Commissar who is his second in command. We also have the perspectives of a couple of humans from Shardenus, one ready to do his duty and die for it, while the other is ready to do whatever it takes to stay alive. Finally, we have the imperial assassin-spy, sent ahead to stir up trouble within the besieged city and kill the enemy command, if necessary and possible.

I was particularly taken in by some of the twists displayed in this book. There are no real heroes, not even the Space Marines themselves. At one point or another, all of the main protagonists behave in a questionable way so that it was difficult for me (not to say almost impossible) to find any of them really likeable. Another twist is to make the Space Marines into "Super-Machines", rather than the usual "Super-humans" (or "Post-Humans") that have become closer to the Mechanicum than they are to normal humans. A third is the importance of the representative of the Mechanicum, with Magos Ys in a position to command the Titan Battlegroup but also forces loyal to the Iron Hands, if necessary. In fact, you get the impression that Magos Ys's role is somewhat equivalent to that of Heriat the General-Commissar, except that she is probably much more powerful.

The battle scenes and the enemy are much less original. While good, the depiction of grueling battles against contaminated humans, Daemons and so on definitely have an air of "déjà vu" and are rather standard, although I am not sure to what extent or even whether the author can and should be "blamed" for this. The climax - the last battle at the top of the highest spire of the highest and biggest hive - is also not very original, and you know how it is going to finish almost before it starts.

Nevertheless, this was a good read, with the original twists compensating somewhat for what it essentially a variation on the theme of the planetary assault to reclaim a strategic planet infested by the forces of Chaos. For me, however, this is not one of my favorite Space Marine BAttles Novel and it is only just worth four stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Combat, 23 Jun 2012
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
As a long-time fan of the Warhammer Space Marine Battle series (this being the 10th book in the series) I've come to expect more and more from each offering to see where the various authors push the boundaries. Here in this title, Chris Wraight takes the Iron Hands deep into the heart of a battle against followers of the Chaos God Slaanesh on a world that has turned from the light of the God Emperor.

The combat is gruelling, the inter combatant relationships fraught as mistrust vies against the goals and when added to an author who knows how to gain every twist from the reader to the maximum effect, allows the reader to get a story that will haunt them long after the final battle is won as the cost of blood and death is counted by friends and foes alike in a never ending eternal struggle. Add to this great dialogue and an author who feels like they've explored the inter unit relationships in depth and all in you're in for a real treat. Great stuff.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What a dissapointment, 27 July 2012
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Not at all sure what went wrong here, Chris Wraight has done some of the best BL novels to come out in ages, he's right up their with Dan and Aaron as far as im concerned, but Wrath of Iron was just such a let down. There was none of the glorious exploration of a space marine chapter as in Battle of the fang, or any of the interesting characters we find in his warhammer novels. Instead we have a few good ideas and beautiful scenarios in the beginning which get consumed in an overly fragmented and war porn indulgent mess. I actually skipped most of the last third of the book as I was so bored with it, its supposed to be about the Iron Hands first and formost, instead they almost seem to be sidelined in favour of an Imperial guard story arc only showing up to show how tuff marines are and finish off the bad guys in fashionably over the top style.

Its the White scars all over again, a chance to really develop a lesser known chapter squandered on a trite point A to point B story, I'm upset because I know he is so much better than this.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bought for my son (14), 19 Feb 2014
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I. J. Waterhouse "Aquashack" (Portsmouth England) - See all my reviews
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He says it is a good read if you are into the Warhammer gaming and all that

Value for money

Recommended
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very dark read, 10 Jan 2014
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Magos - See all my reviews
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This book is a very good read. Its well written and and despite it being a dark read , its full of action and Chris Wraight creates some great characters that you find yourself as a reader struggling to love or hate in equal measure. Life 40000 years in the future is hard for mankind and I think the Wrath of Iron creates a vision that is true to form of what the Dark Millennium is really like. I thought Chris Wraight has envisioned the Iron Hands perfectly and I found more out about the way the Clan Raukaan works and thinks than any Warhammer source I have ever read. Despite them supposedly being "The Good Guys" they have become a twisted parody of what their Primarch Ferrus Manus, would have wanted and are a chapter so close to the brink of damnation, yet they are blind to this. I enjoyed the politics that go on between the Imperial Guard, the Iron Hands and the Mechanicus. The assassin was also a very interesting character. The action is described vividly and is no holds barred. The final battle is awesome and I found myself rooting for the Iron Hands despite not really liking Rauth the Iron Hand commander very much - he really is a monster.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Cold as Iron, 15 July 2013
By 
Mr G. (Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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This is the 10th volume of the Space Marine Battles series. It is original in some ways, but not at all original in others.
One of my first reactions was that this another book was about an Imperial army led by Space Marines that attacks a planet corrupted by Chaos and seeks to reconquer it for the Imperium of Man. Again like in Angel of Fire (a turkey, be warned), they make planet fall and attack the massive capital city of the planet, this time called Shardenus Prime.
However, that is where the similarities stop. Instead of being commanded by Lord Macharius, or some other leader of the Imperial Guard, the commander in chief is Rauth, Captain of Clan Raukaan of the Iron Hands chapter of Space Marines. The imperial Guard and their commanders are under the orders of the Iron Hands, and somewhat resentful because of the way the Iron Hands use them in a callous way without explaining their decisions and the threats that they are facing, however, I liked the way the Space Marines were in command for a change, as its usually reversed.
Another piece of originality, is that the Iron Hands, despite their heroism, are depicted in a way that makes them seem unsympathetic, even barbaric. Human feelings, seem to be almost totally absent from their behavior. Rauth and his brothers simply do not care for humans, who they view as nothing better than cannon fodder, letting the Iron Hands accomplish what lesser men can't. The battle scenes and the enemy are much less original. This does not mean they are bad, but the depiction of epic and desperate battles against hordes of tainted humans, Daemons and so on definitely has an air of "déjà vu" and is rather cliched. The climactic finale - the last battle at the top of the highest spire of the highest and biggest hive - is also unoriginal, and you of course know how it is going to finish before it begins.
However, this is a good read, with the original twists somewhat compensating for what is essentially a variation on the tired planetary assault theme. That said, this is still worth a look, as Wraight writes well and there is plenty worse out there.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Wrath of Iron, Chris Wraight- Book Review, 13 Mar 2013
I don't really know what I thought of Wrath of Iron. After reading Gav Thorpe's novels on the Dark Angels, I was extremely excited to get stuck into another Space Marine Battle Novel, as The Purging of Kadillus was so brilliant! However, for me, this book did not live up to that expectation. Nevertheless, it does not mean that I did not enjoy it.

The novel tells the tale of The Iron Hands and their allies- The Imperial Guard and the Titan Battlegroup Praxes. The Space Marines and their allies are sent to purge the world of Shardenus, which comes under the control of the Chaos Gods. Shardenus is an industrial waste with most of its inhabitants living underground to avoid the poisonous fumes that inhabit the world's surface. The synopsis sets the book up to be an epic battle. The Marines are tasked with breaking into the planet's underbelly, fighting off Daemons and Mutants and finally, destroying the Chaos Leader that is corrupting the world. However, I felt the one problem that let this epic-ness down was the Iron Hands!

I have never really read into the Iron Hands before this book. The chapter revolves around the belief that the human form is weak and that the only way they, as machines of war, can overcome this weakness is to literally become machines. The Iron Hands do this by firstly removing one of their hands and replacing it with an iron one. Then over their many decades of service, they remove other body parts and replace them with implants and machines. This leads to many of the Marines losing their human feelings and compassion. I think this explains why I didn't take to this book as much as I did with other Space Marine novels. This is because there is no real depth to any of the Iron Hands as they have no real feelings or back story. I thought that as a reader, you didn't get any real feel for who the Iron Hands are, like you do in other Space Marine Battle novels. I also think this is why the book is taken up with the stories of The Imperial Guard and the Titans, as much as it is with the Iron Hands. I think this is because without these subplots in the novel, the plot of the Iron Hands would have only taken about 100 pages to read.

Nevertheless, as an author and writer, I really liked Chris Wraight and when the Iron Hands did get interesting towards the end, his description of the gory battle and their last push really captivated me and made me want to read more of his novels.

All in all, I felt a little disappointed with this book but I think this is because I am not a fan of the Iron Hands, however, the ending is great and definitely made this book worth a read. I would suggest it to anyone who is a Warhammer 40k fan, specifically if you're an Iron Hands player. I'd also suggest it if you like sci-fi and have never read a Warhammer 40k novel before. The Space Marines Battle series is a great way to get into the wonderful world of Warhammer, so why not give one of the excellent novels in the series a try!

For more book reviews google adam-p-reviews.
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5.0 out of 5 stars on the button, 30 July 2012
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Yet again an excellant book from Warhammer about a space marine chapter namely the "iron hands" .
To my mind this is how space marines should be ( namely xenophic , homicidal fearless psychopaths who see nothing beyong fulfilling their given mission)HURRAH!!!.
I feel that some books give to much of a human face which lessens their appeal (in my opinion).
In this book the iron hands do what space marines do best , namely taking on the enemies of the human race in the way they know best(i will not reveal any more other than to say if you like a violent storyline you wont be disappointed.
In short this a book well worth purchasing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 17 Sep 2014
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Great read
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Wrath of Iron (Space Marine Battles)
Wrath of Iron (Space Marine Battles) by Chris Wraight (Paperback - 26 Jun 2012)
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