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5.0 out of 5 stars Paradigm shift
Its not very often you have everything you thought you knew flipped on its head. I've always tried to read about both sides of an argument to form my own opinion, so I thought I'd see what he had to say. I've long been a bit cynical about some of the expressions of green policy like biofuels, carbon trading, green subsidies and taxes, the anti-nuclear lobby, and the fact...
Published 14 days ago by Helen Back

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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Will only convince those who are completely ignorant
This book is profoundly misleading to those who aren't familiar with relevant scientific studies of climate change. By suggesting inaction, it is also very dangerous for those future generations who will have to suffer the consequences of the policies advocated by people such as Delingpole who have their heads stuck firmly in the sand. I was aghast at the lack of...
Published 2 months ago by Runner 77


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5.0 out of 5 stars Paradigm shift, 2 Sep 2014
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Its not very often you have everything you thought you knew flipped on its head. I've always tried to read about both sides of an argument to form my own opinion, so I thought I'd see what he had to say. I've long been a bit cynical about some of the expressions of green policy like biofuels, carbon trading, green subsidies and taxes, the anti-nuclear lobby, and the fact that the decarbonising agenda ultimately means depopulation, but I'd presumed this was at the extreme end of the green spectrum, and had no idea how deep the issue ran and how distorted the science has become. Thanks James Delingpole for reminding me to always research the facts, and that 2,500 scientists CAN be wrong if their careers depend on it.
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Will only convince those who are completely ignorant, 7 July 2014
This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing your Children's Future (Paperback)
This book is profoundly misleading to those who aren't familiar with relevant scientific studies of climate change. By suggesting inaction, it is also very dangerous for those future generations who will have to suffer the consequences of the policies advocated by people such as Delingpole who have their heads stuck firmly in the sand. I was aghast at the lack of scientific basis for almost everything the author claims. Well worth avoiding, unless you're carrying out research into propaganda and denial.
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32 of 42 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too political, very little science, 26 Nov 2012
Pro's:
Exposes a lot of the exaggerated and misinformed claims of lobby groups, and credibility issues with the IPCC.
Has a good discussion of overpopulation, pointing out that there have been people saying overpopulation was a problem since the Roman times, I liked this chapter.

Con's:
Very little scientific analysis, it seems author's scepticism is based mostly on attitudes like: 'those left-wing nutters believe in it, therefore it must be nonsense'.
Contains some rather strange analogies, For example, when discussing the attitude of people who take the view that the science isn't settled, therefore it would still be prudent to reduce emissions in case AGW is real, the author compares this to Pascal's wager about believing in god because the cost of doing is small vs the risk of god existing and going to hell for not believing in him.
Quite bizarre attacks on energy-saving light bulbs, calling them yellow and flickery (is he buying cheap ones on ebay I wonder?), my experience of them is quite the opposite.

On the whole, I think if you're interested in politics, and less in science, and of the right-wing persuasion you will like this book - it's kind of the anti-Ben Elton.

The reason I wouldn't give it a better rating though is that the author's arguments are 90% using the lawyers trick of attacking the credibility of witnesses, he makes very little scientific argument, only mentioning questionable tree-ring data, and talking about there being no warming since 1998. Also he is quite inconsistent in the book, at one point saying AGW wasn't happening, and at another saying the science wasn't settled. He also makes what I think is a really childish statement of "Who wouldn't want a few more degrees of warming?" - I think most people living below 35 degrees of latitude wouldn't.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If all the climategate doomsayers so despise this man and this book then why don't they sue him for 'libel' or for 'defamation, 24 Aug 2014
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C. Webb - See all my reviews
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I have a big question. If all the climategate doomsayers so despise this man and this book then why don't they sue him for 'libel' or for 'defamation of character'? He names, names. He states details. He refers to real specifics. He doesn't hide behind any verbal preamble, he blatantly accuses numerous 'scientists' of lying. So why can't they come to court and defend their position?

I also have a problem with some of the negative reviews that seem to have a common thread citing a 'lack of scientific basis' or 'very little science' which is bizarre when its the very scientific 'facts' by these 'scientists' that he is questioning. To be fair to him 47% of the book is given over to very, very detailed reference information, showing where each and every point made refers back to.

Is what he says true? I don't know. What I do know is that the growing scepticism is because of the total lack of open debate. This can be sorted once and for all by allowing honest and open discussion
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1.0 out of 5 stars What a disappointment!, 1 Sep 2014
Shame science is unable to support this man's ideological principles. Found lacking in scientific understanding at every corner. Very disappointing read.
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32 of 46 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A book that riles against the exact thing it does., 29 July 2013
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I would consider myself fairly open-minded about the whole green issue, but this book is beyond silly.

It seems a ploy on the over-the-top controversy simply to sell books, rather than actually address the issues at hand.

There are numerous cases where the author has attempted to refute scientific method, and apply non-scientific guesswork in the void he has created.

Whilst the whole green agenda is irrefutably mislead by politics, this book is even more misleading.

Its as if the whole book is a poorly judged piece of satire, or just meant to be for ignorant people that read the daily mail.

The opinions of those that deny tested and evidence science and claim the government are leading a global conspiracy should be sectioned for paranoid schizophrenia, something that this book is trying to perpetuate.

Had the author had a background in environmental science, or a professorship in a similar discipline this work might have have some grounding, but it offers no peer-reviewed or statistically tested evidence for the arguments he puts across.

The thing with science is only tested and repeatable evidence can you make an argument, whereas this book simply guesses.

Readable if you think the whole book is intended as satire, or some highly ironic ruse, otherwise it comes across as the work of an ill-educated madman.
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52 of 75 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Time for reflection, 12 Jun 2012
By 
D. Lye "David Lye" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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As a layman who is interested in the subject, I cannot be sure whether James Delingpole is right in his rebuttal of the theory of man-made global warming. But whatever the truth may be, Delingpole has written a trenchant, concise and entertaining critique of the environmentalist lobby that has grown up around the climate change agenda.

On climate change itself, Delingpole's two key points are (a) that global temperatures stopped rising in 1998, and (b) that the case for man-made climate change rests to a large extent on dubious and selective use of research evidence. Those are potentially explosive claims. I asked a climate scinece expert I know who told me (a) is true (adding that the science depends on trends over the longer term - so this is not a conclusive piece of evidence either way), but said that (b) is arguable. But Delingpole does enough in this book to make the case to rebut the environmentalists' claim that "the science is settled".

More tellingly, Delingpole exposes the left-wing/socialist bias that underpins the environmentalist movement - hence the title: watermelons are green on the outside, red on the inside. He also exposes the power, resources and tactics (including censorship and character assassination) of parts of the green movement, which belie its squeaky-clean image. And this, for me was the most telling part of the book. Even if one accepts man-made climate change as plausible, the remedies called for by the green lobby are socialistic, utopian, and of dubious utility. Authors who accept the climate change hypothesis - for example Mark Lynas - have come up with more practical and sensible approaches to dealing with it, whilst Bjorn Lomborg and others have exposed the inadequacies of the current Kyoto consensus.

Delingpole's book is best read alongside these other works, to put it in a proper context. But it's a strong and distincive contribution to the debate. And it's highly entertaining too.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Am I an idiot?, 28 May 2014
By 
Simon Osborne (Leicester, Leicestershire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing your Children's Future (Paperback)
Counter arguments are useful; they test your own conviction, strength your responses, encourage a continued debate and deepen understanding. I bought this book as my thinking tends to lean towards the ideology of individuals who frustrate Delingpole and I wanted to know why this considers me to be a Watermelon.

I enjoy reading blogs. Short, snappy and often humorous, they can tug, poke, annoy, engage and at times, inspire. Blogs are often emotive, it is this that makes them interesting, but in this medium as the whole book is written in the style of a blog, I am not convinced it portrays Delingpole’s arguments in a way he would wish; it becomes quite tiresome to read and the general theme and run of argument is lost.

Self-deprecation can also be humorous but here it is overused and does not help the argument. And while Delingpole at times derides emotive language he tends to be guilty of it himself which at times gets a little bit tedious and school playground - my scientist is better and more honest than your scientist.

The conclusions are a bit flat, while he suggests he understands the counter arguments about liking green fields, clean air, and polar bears he doesn’t really deliver a conclusive finale. He states there is no middle way yet it can also be written that global corporations dominate much of government debate, are non-democratic in the structure, and yet dictate massively what we eat, consume and how we live. Dissent both left and right and tends to steers a middle way, which is why I have given this 3 stars, not great read but certainly not a bad one either.

Delingpole plays an important role in challenging green views, dissension is always difficult, one man’s freedom fighter is another man terrorist so they say, but I don’t think inflammatory language and branding me an idiot, as well as a watermelon, both of which I believe I am not, helps me endear myself to his argument.
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64 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 16 Feb 2012
By 
Toby Young (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I wasn't a hardened climate change sceptic before I read this book - but now I am! Not only does Delingpole write beautifully, he methodically takes apart the "scientific" case for anthropogenic global warning and exposes the hidden Left-wing agenda behind the climate change rhetoric.

When I last appeared on BBC Radio 4's Any Questions it was in Caroline Lucas's constituency in Brighton, Lucas being Britain's only Green Member of Parliament. The audience were far to the left of the Labour Party on almost every issue - the European Union, UK fiscal policy, public service reform, you name it. It puzzled me at the time, but now I know why. Thoroughly recommended.
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30 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watermelons by James Delingpole, 3 Mar 2012
By 
F. Hugh Eveleigh (Winchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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Delingpole is one of those writers whose enthusiasm sometimes outshines the glitter of celebrity but in this case, (for all his occasional outrageous form), the kernel of veracity is consistent throughout. I have read some seven 'sceptic' books on the climate thing and contrariwise quite a few which purport to give the 'consensus' view and as a result of all my reading and investigation and with this book as an end piece, am now one who is no longer sceptical but sure that the case for man-made global warming/climate change just does not add up. I take the Spectator and read Delingpole weekly. He is always good value and so reasonable with it. He is not a fanatic, just a dedicated journalist seeking the truth or as close as he can get to it. No hesitation in recommending the book.
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