Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (7)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hate: Mattheww Collins
This is a very important book that should be studied in British schools throughout the land. It is essentially the memoirs of Matthew Collins, a South London born son of Irish immigrants, who as a teenager and young man drifted into the seedy and violent world of the British far-right political movement. More than this, however, it is a testimony to human growth, and...
Published 20 months ago by ShiDaDao Ph.D

versus
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I don't like the left or the right & have no understanding ...
I don't like the left or the right & have no understanding of why people from the same back-ground go to war over people who don't care about them (The left) or hate them (The right)

My reason for buying this book was to get an understanding of it all. I didn't. Basically the author appears to be a drunk who flitted between sides. 'Traitor' i think is the...
Published 3 months ago by F Bomb


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hate: Mattheww Collins, 14 Aug. 2013
This review is from: Hate: My Life in the British Far Right (Paperback)
This is a very important book that should be studied in British schools throughout the land. It is essentially the memoirs of Matthew Collins, a South London born son of Irish immigrants, who as a teenager and young man drifted into the seedy and violent world of the British far-right political movement. More than this, however, it is a testimony to human growth, and proves that people can and do change for the better, as Collins (now a friend of Billy Bragg) eventually came to abandon his former beliefs, and worked with the anti-racist Searchlight magazine to undermine the National Front (NF) and the British National Party (BNP).

The 2012 paperback edition contains 308 numbered pages and is comprised of a Foreword, an Introduction, an Epilogue and 34 untitled chapters (Collectively called 'HATE'), and 8 pages of photographs.

Acknowledgements
Foreword (By Billy Bragg)
What is What
Who is Who
Introduction
34 Chapters (HATE)
Epilogue

Matthew Collins (b. 1970) developed an interest in far-right politics from a teenager living in South London, and slowly got involved in the National Front in the mid to late 1980's. This book charts his progress and activities as a violent and racist thug supporting the fascist cause, and records his remarkable metamorphosis into what may described as a very decent human being. This book is a crucial study of the inner workings of the British far-right, and conveys the events of the late 1980's and early 1990's, that simultaneously saw the demise of the National Front and the rise of the British National Party. What Collins has to say is important as he was with the upper echelons of both movements as the events unfolded, and witnessed the racism, violence, rape, drug addiction, alcoholism, drug dealing, and arms procurement, which are everyday occurrences in the British far-right. Collins makes the point that virtually all far-right members are filled (and motivated by hate) have served time in jail, come from backgrounds of various types of abuse, are alcoholic, and addicted to drugs.

The turning point for Collins was when the NF attacked a meeting of predominantly Asian men and women (including old people and pregnant women) at welling Library in South London. This was a meeting about the rise of far-right inspired racial violence in the area. The NF ran into the library and beat men and women mercilessly - and tried to breakdown a toilet door to get their hands on a young pregnant woman who was obviously scared for her life and the life of her unborn child. The book is a catalogue of similar seemingly pointless, but hate-filled episodes of manic violence, inspired by limited intellectual and carried-out by young, shaven-headed British males. Collins points out the opportunistic manner in which the far-right would harass and intimidate non-white people, and any white people they deemed to be betraying the pure white race. This included attacking Socialists as they were selling their newspapers, taking over entire tube trains and expelling black and Asian people, as well as hiring the York Hall in London for NF rallies.

It is obvious that the British far-right is motivated purely by hatred, and that this hatred is a product of an impoverished youth, either culturally or materially. Collins says that as a 'political' party the far-right did not have any coherent policies - other than the need to start a 'race war' on Britain's streets. This general approach of racist inspired 'anti-immigration' rhetoric is often aided by the Conservative Party (and newspapers such as the Sun, Mail and Telegraph) which has members who are sympathetic to the far-right and are sometimes even members of far-rigt groups. Collins tells how the far-right go in and out of fashion with those who hold casual racist attitudes throughout the UK, and how the far-right has created relative power-basis in areas such as Torquay - where immigration is very small, etc. Matthew Collins is a brave man. In a very real sense, the fact that he saw the errors of his ways, and actively took action against his former misguided colleagues, marks him as a true British hero.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I don't like the left or the right & have no understanding ..., 21 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Hate: My Life in the British Far Right (Paperback)
I don't like the left or the right & have no understanding of why people from the same back-ground go to war over people who don't care about them (The left) or hate them (The right)

My reason for buying this book was to get an understanding of it all. I didn't. Basically the author appears to be a drunk who flitted between sides. 'Traitor' i think is the correct terminology!

It's one of those easy to read books with BIG print for the idiots like me who want to read about this rubbish.

Why the left constantly interfere with the right?? Just let them get on with it, people fought wars for free speech. That said does anyone listen to the NF these days - Is there even one still about?

Poor book - Don't waste your money giving the author another pot of gold to waste on booze. Buy a moronic football violence book instead....!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star, 13 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm sure I've read this before......
Oh yeah same book, different author
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ho-hum., 20 Feb. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Hate (Kindle Edition)
I bought this as, although I have little sympathy for the National Front and similar organisations, I was interested to find what goes on inside the heads of their followers. After I had ploughed through chapters after chapter of turgid prose, the picture that emerges is one of a fairly disorganised rabble that seems to comprise of bitter old men and vacuous youths, spoiling for a fight. It doesn't give any insight and even fails to make the hackles rise. Give it a miss.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Weapon Against Fascism, 18 Oct. 2011
By 
Dominic O'Neill "Dominic" (Belfast) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
There are at least a dozen references to wanking and other bodily functions in this book. I'm curious what the publisher thought of this - was there any stage where somebody said, `why does he keep talking about wanking?' But there's a clear reason for it: this is in many respects a book about growing up, and the adolescent prison of masturbation and self-loathing becomes a gruesome microcosm of the author's love/hate affair with the far right. In many respects, the pathetic Neanderthals (with respect to actual Neanderthals) of the far-right embody the father-figure Collins never had, albeit an abusive surrogate that for many years he can't help but keep running back to.

The book is peppered with names and personalities, some appear fleetingly and others stay the course. This index of names can be overwhelming (I found myself flicking back and forth, but that's what books are for (apologies to kindle users but this authenticates the book against its detractors. The gallery of villains is grotesquely Dickensian and they often act like the cast of the once-tauted, gladly never produced, `Carry on Mosley'. This is often Vaudeville-Fascism - laughably low-audienced and high-comedy.

The author apparently reached the `upper echelons' of the National Front and his description of the corruption, inadequate leadership and complicit violence of the `movement' is a damning indictment of the current line of organizations (BNP and EDL) which share their `ideology' and members. But the attraction to this life for any working-class, fatherless London brute youth is believable. It's a club that wants him as a member, it can give him a sense of a belonging and somewhere to put all his shame and anger - people who are different, people who aren't white and working-class. It can also give him people to go drinking with and other people to want to punch.

Collins pulls no punches in this respect, although there are more scuffles than actual all-out brawls. Nor does he make any excuses for himself or romanticize his story by highlighting one single epiphany. In fact his `transformation' initially seems to begin when he gets in touch with Searchlight magazine, but it transpires that many other fascists are doing this, motivated more by money than an ideological awakening.

But of course, a transformation did occur that empowered Collins to become a powerful figure in the Hope Not Hate Campaign which has stood firm against and virtually crushed the BNP.

So I recommend it. The book is a superb weapon against Fascism in modern Britain...for those who can stomach the alarmingly seductive face of Fascism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing, 18 Aug. 2012
By 
Blitzkrieg Bopper (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hate: My Life in the British Far Right (Paperback)
If you are interested in the politics of the margins and recent British social history you will find this a compelling read.
One question, who is the mystery well-known person with NF links alluded to throughout the book? I think it's obvious.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A window on the lives of the far-right, 14 Sept. 2012
By 
D. L. Raybould "DLR" (Newport, Gwent, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book charts a dramatic journey from frustrated youth to fascist thug to anti-fascist campaigner. This a journey peppered with violence, racism, hard drinking, drugs, pornography, football hooliganism and excessive masturbation. Matthew Collins was a teenage member of the National Front in the 80's and 90's and witnessed its slow and messy demise and then the ascent and re-branding of the BNP and the extreme right as a whole. Collins gives a unique insight into the nature and behaviour of those on the fringes of society. It allowed me to understand how extremists recruit and target the vulnerable, how they twist situations and frustrations to their own ends and more importantly how they truly behave.

As you read how a young Collins became intoxicated by extremism despite the grubbiness and maliciousness of it's peddlers you can appreciate the pull that extremist beliefs and easy answers must have to vulnerable youngsters who are searching for answers and direction. The most depressing thing whilst reading this book is realising the easy answers sold to Collins by the NF are the same being peddled to those caught up in the BNP and EDL now.

The cast of characters in this book have a warmth to them, despite their vile political beliefs. This helps and is more based in reality than casting them as pantomime villains. These were Collins friends, no matter what violence or criminal activity they were capable of inflicting. The fact that he portrays not only their flaws but highlights their character quirks helps understand how they interacted with each other and the outside world. There are some truly frightening and sickening moments whilst there are also moments of pure comedy.

The book is a very easy read and Collins covers a lot of detail in a way that doesn't overload the reader. His tone is ranges from the serious to the silly. The constant references to his masturbation may seem OTT at first but when you get to a certain point in the book you realise the link between boredom, single life, pornography, masturbation and seeking any sort of thrill outside the humdrum of life fits in perfectly with extremist culture. In a Twitter discussion with the author I put it this way "I was more disturbed by the fact you're a Palace fan than the maniacal masturbation and swearwords".

My only criticism of the book is that the last couple of chapters which cover his conversion to anti-fascist campaigner are a little light. It just seems a little bit rushed and more detail would've finished the book off better. His conclusions were solid but I was left wanting to know more about his work with Searchlight, Hope Not Hate and more analysis on the continuing work to combat the growing EDL and monitoring the dysfunctional BNP.

Matthew Collins' book should be a must read for youngsters curious about politics and adults who should know better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an important book, 28 Nov. 2011
By 
B. R. Osborn - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The teenaged Matthew Collins was an angry misfit, suffering sexual frustration, early signs of alcoholism and a general sense of alienation and disempowerment. He was also about a hundred times more intelligent, sensitive and sane than the crowd he mixed with: the Far Right of the 70s and 80s, the architects and predecessors of rise of the organised, PR-heavy BNP and EDL of the last decade. Collins' essential humanity led to him working as a mole for the anti-fascist magazine Searchlight, later taking a leading role in the HOPE not hate campaign that ensured the BNP never saw the political success they had been forecast.

It's not always an easy read, requiring an attentive reader to enter a world that they (if they're lucky) know very little about. It's also disturbing, sometimes disgusting. But it is also important, not only as a reminder of the stupidity and brutality of the far right, but also as a warning about how extremism can provide a sense of identity for people who feel they have nothing else.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very revealing as to the mindset of the far right, 25 July 2012
Following a recent unwanted invasion of my town by the English Defence League (EDL), I've been struggling to understand why young people are attracted to far right organisations. Matthew Collins' book is a real eye-opener and shows how easy it is to be drawn into violence and hate when you're young and confused. The book is very well-written - even funny in places - and is a superb account of events in the NF and BNP in the late 80s/early 90s. It's a pity there isn't an index - that's my only criticism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A PREVIOUS AQUAINTANCE, 7 Dec. 2013
This review is from: Hate: My Life in the British Far Right (Paperback)
Well,I knew Matthew Collins and I have read his book.I trawled through it to find libellous accusations aimed at my goodself,to no avail.He has,however,published one libellous and actionable accusation in relation to this reviewer on another site,the point being that,if he is willing to lie,with the possibility of litigation in relation to myself,then he is obviously going to lie with abandon when recounting everyday events during his 'career' in the far-right.

Dear oh dear,Matthew.How far you have travelled in the space of just over twenty years.From Ian Anderson's office boy to Gerry Gable's...er...office boy.What career advancement.

The other reviewers of this 'magnum opus',all fron the far left,seem to be singing the praises of this individual.I was THERE,I SAW most of this.Even though I was [and still am] a 'Fascist',I know what a shallow and deceitful opportunist Matthew Collins is.I KNEW HIM!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Hate: My Life in the British Far Right
Hate: My Life in the British Far Right by Matthew Collins (Paperback - 12 July 2012)
£8.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews