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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ours to choose?
Greenfield tells us that his book is about our fixation with choice. He goes on to dismantle the common assumptions that we live in a world where choices are available and that we have the ability to make choices freely. In the course of which he explains the meaning and consequences of responsibility, both personal and collective. His illustration of riding a motorcycle...
Published on 13 Nov. 2012 by Hande Z

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not very cogent or inspiring
The first point to make is that this is by Law Professor. The second is that he is an American.

These points are relevant because the potentail UK reader should be ready for a lot of discussion of American legal cases, baseball umpires' decisons, and US political appointments.

Ultimately the book comes to no particuarly striking points. The writer...
Published on 5 April 2013 by James Lizard


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ours to choose?, 13 Nov. 2012
By 
Hande Z (Singapore) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Myth of Choice: Personal Responsibility in a World of Limits (Paperback)
Greenfield tells us that his book is about our fixation with choice. He goes on to dismantle the common assumptions that we live in a world where choices are available and that we have the ability to make choices freely. In the course of which he explains the meaning and consequences of responsibility, both personal and collective. His illustration of riding a motorcycle without wearing a crash helmet and meeting an accident illustrates the confluence and confusion between the two types of responsibility, and the role that choice plays in it. Choosing to ride without a helmet is a personal decision, but that may not be a case involving only personal responsibility and choice. Injury and damage arising from an accident involves insurance and public money. Many of our actions impose a cost on others. Being a lawyer, Greenfield examines the types of choices judges make and what assumptions lay beneath those choices. He criticizes judges who look upon their role as "umpires" when, he argues, that is not the case. He discusses the issue choice in debates about gay rights. Why, he asks, should the right to choose not be protected in this instance when the right to choose one's religion is? He shows that conservatives and liberals have a lot more in common than they think when they talk about personal responsibility. If we do something because it is in our nature to do, should we be personally responsible? Conversely, if we do something because we had been affected by external influences, are we personally responsible?

Greenfield discusses the impact of external factors that influence the choices we make, and, further, in discussing the way our brain works, he questions how it is that we become susceptible to such influence. He examines the impact of culture on choice, pointing out that France had banned women from wearing the hijab, and citing a Maureen Dowd article in "The New York Times", the Pope in 2004 when he was a Cardinal had written a Vatican document "urging women to be submissive partners, resisting any adversarial roles with men and cultivating `feminine values' like 'listening'".
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not very cogent or inspiring, 5 April 2013
This review is from: The Myth of Choice: Personal Responsibility in a World of Limits (Paperback)
The first point to make is that this is by Law Professor. The second is that he is an American.

These points are relevant because the potentail UK reader should be ready for a lot of discussion of American legal cases, baseball umpires' decisons, and US political appointments.

Ultimately the book comes to no particuarly striking points. The writer urges us to be aware of our cultural bias in making decisions. Fair enough, but there's a lot to wade through to get there.

The front cover quotes from a review in the Boston Globe that it is "tightly argued". Is that a good enough reason to read it?
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The Myth of Choice: Personal Responsibility in a World of Limits
The Myth of Choice: Personal Responsibility in a World of Limits by Kent Greenfield (Paperback - 19 Jun. 2012)
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