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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delingpole and the Emperor’s New Clothes
This is a light handed yet serious and detailed deconstruction of the global warming hypothesis.

Delingpole sees it as having taken on cult status where believers (‘warmists’) distort scientific evidence in order to pursue a political agenda. Disbelievers are vilified and metaphorically burnt at the stake.

One of the main culprits is the...
Published 2 months ago by Geoffrey Bond

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38 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too political, very little science
Pro's:
Exposes a lot of the exaggerated and misinformed claims of lobby groups, and credibility issues with the IPCC.
Has a good discussion of overpopulation, pointing out that there have been people saying overpopulation was a problem since the Roman times, I liked this chapter.

Con's:
Very little scientific analysis, it seems author's...
Published on 26 Nov 2012 by Iain S


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38 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too political, very little science, 26 Nov 2012
This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future (Paperback)
Pro's:
Exposes a lot of the exaggerated and misinformed claims of lobby groups, and credibility issues with the IPCC.
Has a good discussion of overpopulation, pointing out that there have been people saying overpopulation was a problem since the Roman times, I liked this chapter.

Con's:
Very little scientific analysis, it seems author's scepticism is based mostly on attitudes like: 'those left-wing nutters believe in it, therefore it must be nonsense'.
Contains some rather strange analogies, For example, when discussing the attitude of people who take the view that the science isn't settled, therefore it would still be prudent to reduce emissions in case AGW is real, the author compares this to Pascal's wager about believing in god because the cost of doing is small vs the risk of god existing and going to hell for not believing in him.
Quite bizarre attacks on energy-saving light bulbs, calling them yellow and flickery (is he buying cheap ones on ebay I wonder?), my experience of them is quite the opposite.

On the whole, I think if you're interested in politics, and less in science, and of the right-wing persuasion you will like this book - it's kind of the anti-Ben Elton.

The reason I wouldn't give it a better rating though is that the author's arguments are 90% using the lawyers trick of attacking the credibility of witnesses, he makes very little scientific argument, only mentioning questionable tree-ring data, and talking about there being no warming since 1998. Also he is quite inconsistent in the book, at one point saying AGW wasn't happening, and at another saying the science wasn't settled. He also makes what I think is a really childish statement of "Who wouldn't want a few more degrees of warming?" - I think most people living below 35 degrees of latitude wouldn't.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delingpole and the Emperor’s New Clothes, 21 Oct 2014
By 
Geoffrey Bond "Savvyeater" (Paphos, Cyprus) - See all my reviews
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This is a light handed yet serious and detailed deconstruction of the global warming hypothesis.

Delingpole sees it as having taken on cult status where believers (‘warmists’) distort scientific evidence in order to pursue a political agenda. Disbelievers are vilified and metaphorically burnt at the stake.

One of the main culprits is the work of cultural Marxists such as Gramsci and their ‘long march through the institutions.’ In this way, a small band of activists shaped public opinion to their own ends. What are their ends? “To achieve global governance by a self-appointed élite” – “and the best way to achieve this is by manipulating and exploiting international concern about the environment.” Whence the ‘Watermelons’ of the title – they are green on the outside and red inside.

For example, the Green Agenda website states, spookily, that it wants “restructuring of the school curriculum which serves to indoctrinate children into politically correct group think”.

As an example of the fascist-like thinking, Delingpole cites the Watermelons’ infamous ‘No Pressure’ video. Intended to be a promotional advertisement to encourage ecological thinking, it showed a class of school children enthusiastically embracing Believers’ philosophy. All, that is, except for two kids who were dubious. The teacher blew them up in a drenching splatter of blood and body parts.

The video is so gruesome that YouTube restricts viewing to 18 and over. And yet the promoters of the film, written by Richard Curtis, sincerely believed that they were doing good. Needless to say, the useful idiots who had supported the film’s production (including The Guardian newspaper and various charities) withdrew the film within 24 hours. But it was too late: as one letter to The Guardian read: "To suggest that people who disagree with you deserve to die is incredibly stupid. Imagine if some Christian group in the US did that to gays, Muslims or anyone else they disagree with. The outrage would be palpable”.

But that is true dialectical Marxist practice: the ends justify the means. In this regard another supreme casualty is the scientific method.

Firstly, evidence that runs contrary to the sect’s global warming beliefs is minimized or ridiculed. So it is that they try desperately to airbrush out of history The Medieval Warm Period when monks cultivated grapes in southern England, and the subsequent Little Ice Age when famines prevailed in Europe and the Greenland Vikings starved to extinction.

The Watermelons need to do this jiggery-pokery to maintain the lineal purity of their hockey stick graph where temperatures flat-lined until recently and then spike upwards (due, they would argue, to human industrial activities). Andrew Montford debunked this fatally flawed view of recent climate evolution in his book ‘The Hockey Stick Illusion’ (which I have reviewed.)

Secondly, contrarian scientific views are stifled and their proponents subject to personal smear campaigns. In a really sinister development, contrarian authors find their papers are no longer accepted in the Journals – or if they are, the journal itself is black-balled.

Delingpole relentlessly provides chapter and verse, starting with the “Climategate” emails hacked out of one of the world’s main global warming hotbeds at East Anglia University, UK. They reveal a remarkable conspiracy to fudge the evidence and cover up their doings. After that come the slanted pronouncements from the august Royal Society and of course the International Panel on Climate Change with its farcical claims, swiftly withdrawn, of the imminent disappearance of the Himalayan glaciers.

Personally, I am a scientist used to thinking on geological timescales. As such, it is perfectly normal to think of the Earth’s climate gyrating through great fluctuations. After all there was a time when there were jungles at the poles, laying down the Arctic oil; and other times when ice sheets stretched down to the Thames. In my view, in the face of such great forces of Nature, man’s efforts to control the climate are puny and futile.

I am also well versed in mathematics and so I also know the limits of computer models. They can’t model accurately how water flows in a pipe, let alone predict the weather for more than a few days ahead. The Bank of England’s models couldn’t predict the financial crisis. The reason is simple: they are trying to model ‘chaotic’ systems.

In the mathematical sense these systems work to known laws but they are, by nature unpredictable – the so-called ‘Butterfly Effect’. So an infinitesimally small change in initial assumptions can produce completely opposite results. Climate change models beloved of the ‘warmist sect’ are not only full of questionable initial assumptions, they are highly sensitive to the slightest variation in them.

But Delingpole’s real frustration is that governments pour so many trillions of taxpayer dollars into decarbonisation schemes. This money could be put to much better purpose, including intelligent efforts to manage global warming, should it occur. After all, there are advantages too: vast areas of territory would be opened up for agriculture in Canada and Siberia. Currently, on geological timescales, carbon dioxide levels are at extreme lows – there is a strong argument that we would be doing plants a good turn by increasing CO2 levels.

Meanwhile we continue to be subject to climate change indoctrination on a daily basis. The left-leaning BBC cannot report an unusual weather event without intoning “due to global warming”. I even heard one air-head reporter claiming that an EARTHQUAKE was due to global warming (but, since I haven’t got chapter and verse, and in the interests of scientific rigor, please ignore this comment!)

How did we get here? In the early decades of the last century, public relations experts like Bernays (nephew of Freud) understood and invented the term ‘herd mentality’. It only takes a small group of activists to take the role of Judas Goat and lead the rest of the herd wherever they want. It is then sufficient to keep the herd in a state of constant anxiety so that, like Chicken-Licken, they lose all common sense and run around saying the sky is falling in.

It is only a small step then to consolidate The Big Lie. As Stalin and Hitler understood, little lies are readily seen through – but if the lie is big enough – and the warmist one is – then the herd believes it.

Professionally I see this in other fields, for example, The War on Cancer. Since Richard Nixon signed the act 1971, hundreds of billions of dollars have been spent, with no cure in sight. I suffer Delingpole’s frustration: we know what to do about cancer: it is a lifestyle disease and for peanuts we can get people to live a cancer-beating lifestyle.

But still the gusher of dollars goes into research, into drugs and into surgical procedures. And why would it stop? Just like Eisenhower’s warning about the Military-Industrial complex, there is too much at stake: research grants, scientific careers, medical careers, hospital finances and whole industries depend on the flood of money.

So, in Delingpole’s view, it is with the Global Warming scare too.

Even if you are a Watermelon, try to read this book to understand how vulnerable our society is to capture by vested interests; and to understand how, in the words of Edmund Burke, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paradigm shift, 2 Sep 2014
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Its not very often you have everything you thought you knew flipped on its head. I've always tried to read about both sides of an argument to form my own opinion, so I thought I'd see what he had to say. I've long been a bit cynical about some of the expressions of green policy like biofuels, carbon trading, green subsidies and taxes, the anti-nuclear lobby, and the fact that the decarbonising agenda ultimately means depopulation, but I'd presumed this was at the extreme end of the green spectrum, and had no idea how deep the issue ran and how distorted the science has become. Thanks James Delingpole for reminding me to always research the facts, and that 2,500 scientists CAN be wrong if their careers depend on it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Depressing Ideological Rant, 19 Oct 2014
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I read this book in parallel with Naomi Kline's "This Changes Everything". James Delingpole argues that humans are here for a purpose (to flourish), and can be trusted to do the right thing for the planet given free markets, free trade, and personal liberty. I think Naomi Kline would strongly disagree with this and so do I.

On a more positive note, I did find Watermelons an interesting and funny read. However, I was left thinking that the whole book was intended as a bizarre joke - surely no one could take its line of argument seriously could they!
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If all the climategate doomsayers so despise this man and this book then why don't they sue him for 'libel' or for 'defamation, 24 Aug 2014
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C. Webb - See all my reviews
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I have a big question. If all the climategate doomsayers so despise this man and this book then why don't they sue him for 'libel' or for 'defamation of character'? He names, names. He states details. He refers to real specifics. He doesn't hide behind any verbal preamble, he blatantly accuses numerous 'scientists' of lying. So why can't they come to court and defend their position?

I also have a problem with some of the negative reviews that seem to have a common thread citing a 'lack of scientific basis' or 'very little science' which is bizarre when its the very scientific 'facts' by these 'scientists' that he is questioning. To be fair to him 47% of the book is given over to very, very detailed reference information, showing where each and every point made refers back to.

Is what he says true? I don't know. What I do know is that the growing scepticism is because of the total lack of open debate. This can be sorted once and for all by allowing honest and open discussion
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53 of 76 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Time for reflection, 12 Jun 2012
By 
D. Lye "David Lye" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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As a layman who is interested in the subject, I cannot be sure whether James Delingpole is right in his rebuttal of the theory of man-made global warming. But whatever the truth may be, Delingpole has written a trenchant, concise and entertaining critique of the environmentalist lobby that has grown up around the climate change agenda.

On climate change itself, Delingpole's two key points are (a) that global temperatures stopped rising in 1998, and (b) that the case for man-made climate change rests to a large extent on dubious and selective use of research evidence. Those are potentially explosive claims. I asked a climate scinece expert I know who told me (a) is true (adding that the science depends on trends over the longer term - so this is not a conclusive piece of evidence either way), but said that (b) is arguable. But Delingpole does enough in this book to make the case to rebut the environmentalists' claim that "the science is settled".

More tellingly, Delingpole exposes the left-wing/socialist bias that underpins the environmentalist movement - hence the title: watermelons are green on the outside, red on the inside. He also exposes the power, resources and tactics (including censorship and character assassination) of parts of the green movement, which belie its squeaky-clean image. And this, for me was the most telling part of the book. Even if one accepts man-made climate change as plausible, the remedies called for by the green lobby are socialistic, utopian, and of dubious utility. Authors who accept the climate change hypothesis - for example Mark Lynas - have come up with more practical and sensible approaches to dealing with it, whilst Bjorn Lomborg and others have exposed the inadequacies of the current Kyoto consensus.

Delingpole's book is best read alongside these other works, to put it in a proper context. But it's a strong and distincive contribution to the debate. And it's highly entertaining too.
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65 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 16 Feb 2012
By 
Toby Young (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future (Paperback)
I wasn't a hardened climate change sceptic before I read this book - but now I am! Not only does Delingpole write beautifully, he methodically takes apart the "scientific" case for anthropogenic global warning and exposes the hidden Left-wing agenda behind the climate change rhetoric.

When I last appeared on BBC Radio 4's Any Questions it was in Caroline Lucas's constituency in Brighton, Lucas being Britain's only Green Member of Parliament. The audience were far to the left of the Labour Party on almost every issue - the European Union, UK fiscal policy, public service reform, you name it. It puzzled me at the time, but now I know why. Thoroughly recommended.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Am I an idiot?, 28 May 2014
By 
Simon Osborne (Leicester, Leicestershire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Counter arguments are useful; they test your own conviction, strength your responses, encourage a continued debate and deepen understanding. I bought this book as my thinking tends to lean towards the ideology of individuals who frustrate Delingpole and I wanted to know why this considers me to be a Watermelon.

I enjoy reading blogs. Short, snappy and often humorous, they can tug, poke, annoy, engage and at times, inspire. Blogs are often emotive, it is this that makes them interesting, but in this medium as the whole book is written in the style of a blog, I am not convinced it portrays Delingpole’s arguments in a way he would wish; it becomes quite tiresome to read and the general theme and run of argument is lost.

Self-deprecation can also be humorous but here it is overused and does not help the argument. And while Delingpole at times derides emotive language he tends to be guilty of it himself which at times gets a little bit tedious and school playground - my scientist is better and more honest than your scientist.

The conclusions are a bit flat, while he suggests he understands the counter arguments about liking green fields, clean air, and polar bears he doesn’t really deliver a conclusive finale. He states there is no middle way yet it can also be written that global corporations dominate much of government debate, are non-democratic in the structure, and yet dictate massively what we eat, consume and how we live. Dissent both left and right and tends to steers a middle way, which is why I have given this 3 stars, not great read but certainly not a bad one either.

Delingpole plays an important role in challenging green views, dissension is always difficult, one man’s freedom fighter is another man terrorist so they say, but I don’t think inflammatory language and branding me an idiot, as well as a watermelon, both of which I believe I am not, helps me endear myself to his argument.
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37 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE PERFECT HERESY, 20 Feb 2012
This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future (Paperback)
It's about time some true libertarian did an expose of the greatest scam in modern history ,and Delingpole has done just that with this long overdue book .The eco-twits will be up in arms over this ''denial heresy ''and are unlikely to forgive the author in a very long time for his penetrating witt and shameless blasphemy...the pseudo-scientific cult of ''global warming '' is a result of the incestious relationship between junk science and political ideology
The modern enviromentalist movement is a hybrid of elements of both of the secular ideologies of the 2oth century ....the anti-capitalism /spread the wealth of socialism and the neo-paganism /anti humanism of Nazism ...hence the term ''watermellons ''...red on the inside and green on the outside ...the Nazi movement was also a back to nature , romantic pagan , green movement , but with a demonic emphasis on race and nationalism
In a broader sense , looking at these events through a wide angle historical lens , the enviromentalist movement is the return of pre-christian paganism dressed up in a high tech veneer , that is trying to fill the emotional void left by the undermining of christendom by science ...the problem is that with the return of neo-paganism comes the return of PAGAN VALUES that bodes an ill wind for the future of the West
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48 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A standard primer on climate change politics, 28 Feb 2012
By 
This review is from: Watermelons: How Environmentalists are Killing the Planet, Destroying the Economy and Stealing Your Children's Future (Paperback)
Chapter Six has the intrepid Dellers at the Heartland Institute's Fourth Annual Conference on Climate Change in Chicago - enjoying the lavish hospitality from Big Oil, or so we are led to believe.

He is amongst principled people, he says, several of whom have become his personal heroes. And the last thing he wants to do is make them feel unwanted. Nevertheless, he goes on to attempt just that. It really doesn't matter how many brilliant papers Roy Spencer produces on cloud cover feedback, he writes:

"... or how many times that Nils-Axel Mörner proves that sea levels show absolutely no sign of dangerous increase. This is a debate that no sceptic scientist can possibly win, no matter how much apparently overwhelmingly persuasive evidence they produce. That's because the debate was never about 'the science' in the first place. It was, is and always will be about politics."

Latterly, this is the theme to which Dellers returns in his current blog. But the text comes from this superb book, Watermelons, which needs to find a space on the bookshelf of everybody who wants to understand how the world works.

The reason it should have such wide appeal is that, while it comes into the category of "global warming", it is in fact an intensely political book. The sub-title tells all, identifying the subject of the book, the threat that is "killing the planet, destroying the economy and stealing your children's future" - the watermellons, a "handful of political activists, green campaigners and voodoo scientists.

As you might imagine, though, Dellers does not pull punches. In his own forthright style, he writes of a green religion, where the core beliefs are "dressed up as a concern for nature and the future of mankind" and rooted in the most bitter misanthropy and direst pessimism. The advocates:

"... care little for the human species' myriad achievements, preferring to see our race as a blot on the landscape, a parasite, a disease which threatens the eco-system's otherwise perfect balance and which should at best be reduced by natural means - at worst ruthlessly culled."

In scrutinising the political agenda behind greenery, this is a book that needed to be written, but it is a book that had me cursing the man for writing it so well. As one who reserves such books for bedtime reading, consuming a few pages at a time before drifting off to sleep, he kept me awake for many hours as his riveting narrative made Morpheus an unwelcome guest.

Dellers's deft touch, exhibited throughout the book, takes us through a range of topics, from the nature of scares, a remarkable analysis of the first Climategate scandal, a potted history of the climate change agenda, and the costs of the obsession, to an excellent review of how "the bastards" are getting away with "the biggest and most expensive scientific scandal in history".

If I have a favourite section, though, it is in Chapter Eight, in which Dellers welcomes us to "the New World Order". It takes someone with his writing skills to give the subject just enough gravitas to make his arguments credible, yet confer sufficient lightness to avoid bogging us down in the swamp of conspiracy theory.

He thus romps us through many serious matters, such as the Club of Rome, and its sister organisations, the Club of Budapest and the Club of Madrid, ably writing of "master plans" and the like, without invoking the knee-jerk that has other books flying into the bin.

Keeping it light and humorous is one of Dellers's great skills - and only he could have us contemplating Charlie peeing on the compost heap as an introduction to "sustainable develpment". Despite this, one is left in no doubt that there are important issues at stake, with the sinister-sounding "Agenda 21" and many other warmist constructs, dragged out, eviscerated and sun dried.

Predictably, after its exposure in The Daily Mail, the book soared to number one in the global warming listings on Amazon, and has remained there ever since, briefly touching double figures in the overall best-seller rankings. As a book suitable for a wide and non-specialist audience, it deserves that ranking, and should become a standard primer on the politics of climate change.
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