Customer Reviews

176
4.5 out of 5 stars
Grape Expectations: A Family's Vineyard Adventure in France
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£7.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2012
This book is a super insight into what it takes to make a good bottle of wine. It is essential reading for anyone who likes wine. Easy to read and entertaining it makes one appreciate all the hard work that goes into making a glass of red or white. It has me convinced never to buy a bottle of non-organic wine again. If you ever had a dream of buying a property in France with vines to make your own wine - read this book before you commit yourself!

Grape Expectations: A Family's Vineyard Adventure in France
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2012
First read about this book in the Mail.Enjoyed the article so bought the book,I was sorry when I reached the end and hope there is going to be a sequel.What an amazing family,most would have given up,pleased the Feelys carried on. Have just ordered some wine and would love to visit.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 21 December 2012
Increasingly annoyed as it became more of an advert than a story. If I want to buy the author's wine, I will do so based on taste and expert reviews. I do object for paying for a plea for financial support. Pity as there is the bones of a good tale here.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 10 July 2012
I highly recommend this book. It was well-written and made me lose track of time, which is the sign of a good book. As a fellow South African and wine-lover, I enjoyed reading about the Feely's adventures in France. I am inspired by their passion and their guts to follow their dreams. Even though Sean and Caro have gone through great stress, financial anxiety etc, I get the impression they are really living life to the full which is an example to risk-averse, fearful people like me!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2015
As something of an addict of 'Brits settling in France' sagas, I thought this would be right up my street. A few chapters in, I really regret paying for this book, and I can think of many better things to do than finish it.
I've read about some other implausible ventures by ex-pats, but this beats them all! It's one thing attempting to make wine with no proper training, and another thing to do it in a place where you don't know the language... and I really can't imagine why people with master's degrees in finance and economics, but no experience of farming or even country life, could take such a risk. I suspect that the author is deliberately over-exaggerating the problems in an attempt to attract interest and sympathy.
These suspicions are enhanced by the fact that in some ways the story just doesn't hold up. When they move to their filthy hovel their children are supposedly aged 2 and a few months. The new baby is put to sleep in a house full of mice, which apparently eat her milk-stained clothes, while her mother is petrified of mice herself. This runs counter to any kind of maternal instinct I've ever heard of - I just don't think a mother would do this to her child unless there was really no other solution. As for two-year-old Sophia, she just doesn't sound like a two-year-old to me. She is described as 'toddling around', but she looks at a map of her new home with her mother. After only TWO days in France, this two-year-old is immediately packed off to school... where she is happy to recognize her name above a peg. And after four days, she declares 'I'm not going to cry today'. Sorry, is this a toddler or some kind of precocious genius?
Life's too short for me to continue with this...and there is no need to pay to read marketing tracts!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 20 November 2014
I bought this book to learn something about grape growing and learned nothing. For somebody who gives talks in wine production it was disjointed and uniformative. She is described as a disorganised and messy person in her book always in a 'corridor of crisis'. People like that think haphazardly in my experience and the emotional aspects take over from clear and logical communication particularly on technical matters. This is fine if you just want a dramatic account of a person that has deliberately put herself in a stressful situation and then complains about it all the time. She doesn't even tell us the pruning system her grapes are trained to which is fundamental information for a book on grape growing.

She probably has an energetic and bubbly personality whose enthusiasm for wine production has seen her through some difficult negotiating situations but imparting information clearly is not her forte. Basically the writing of the book was just an elaborate marketting ploy which she is good at and which will no doubt work on emotional sympathisers who feel sorry for her but I could have done without all the anxiety and stress which makes up most of the book. If you want a comfortable read then don't bother, it's just disjointed anxiety ridden meandering. Perhaps if she had written it in diary form or used a monthly or seasonal format it might have followed a logic that we could follow rather than try to make sense of a disjointed 'corridor of stress' all the time. We might then have discovered what happened to some of her ideas and projects that disappeared from the story like her mystery building or how she managed to afford to do up half the house to let out when she was broke etc. What she is after is your sympathy and the last chapter that plugs her wines is cringworthy and (between the lines) is equivalent to a begging letter. I won't be bothering with the follow up which is probably just further marketting and emotional hand wringing.

For somebody scared rigid by the sight of a mouse to put themselves in a situation where they have to inspect vats and barrels of wine kept for months and years in outbuildings says it all really (shakes head).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 16 July 2012
I really enjoyed the book . I felt like I was part of the journey that the Feely family took , sharing in the triumps and the diasters and being angry at the social services organisation inspecter for placing blocks in the way forward . Feeling really good when things took an upward turn . There has got to be a sequal PLEASE .
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 11 August 2012
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this heartfelt tale of a brave family who followed their dream to become organic viticulteurs and who overcame difficulties with incomprehensible bureaucracy, a lifestyle change and a steep learning curve coping with a dilapidated building, overgrown terrain and savage machinery-and all while not speaking much French initially.
Visit Haut Garrigue if you live nearby [or even if you make a special journey] and toast the Feely's success in some lovely wine. A well-written book for lovers of France and lovers of good wine that inspired me to visit them.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 July 2015
I'd have had a lot more sympathy for this couple( for that is what she seems constantly to be asking for), if they were a working class couple from a tower block in Salford rather than highly paid people working for large companies. I gave up reading this book after a few chapters, sick of the constant twining on about how hard things were settling in rural France. What did they expect? Had they not done any homework on how France works during their ten year search for their vineyard?
How many vignerons have not lost part of their fingers during the pruning? It made one realise what a cosseted existence they must have had beforehand leaving Dublin.
As for the poor children living in hand me down clothes! My head is banging on my iPad as I write.

Things have obviously improved dramatically since the book was written. Another book ( goodness knows how she finds the time), the gites are fully booked most of the year and the wine is selling successfully. Phew! I almost thought they were going to fail. But that wouldn't have been much of a book would it?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 3 July 2012
For anyone who enjoys French holidays and good wine and dreams of owning their own vineyard this is a brilliant book! Despite all the trials and tribulations the Feely family survive and thrive in the most difficult of situations. Well written, thoughtful and amusing. A tribute to family life and the value of good friends. Read and enjoy! You will certainly learn a lot about French wine as a result!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


The Ripening Sun: One Woman and the Creation of a Vineyard
The Ripening Sun: One Woman and the Creation of a Vineyard by Patricia Atkinson (Paperback - 3 Jun. 2004)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.