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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Netbeans 7 and Java EE 6 make a lethal combination - Recommended Reading
This is an excellent book for folks who want to use Netbeans 7 IDE to do enterprise Java development work. The book is written keeping in mind developers who are new or less experienced with Netbeans 7 IDE.

This book contains 11 chapters.

The first chapter is targeted for novice Netbeans users, downloading and installing on different platforms...
Published on 6 Sep 2011 by Basav

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Netbeans vs EE 6... and the winner is Netbeans!
I have a background in EE developing, but mainly from previous EE versions and with another popular IDE, eclipse, so what I was really looking for was a quick way to get in touch with EE 6 and, at the same time, try netbeans and check how it fits my needs.

I think the book is too much about netbeans and less about EE 6 development, that's why I'm giving it just...
Published 23 months ago by paulor


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Netbeans 7 and Java EE 6 make a lethal combination - Recommended Reading, 6 Sep 2011
This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
This is an excellent book for folks who want to use Netbeans 7 IDE to do enterprise Java development work. The book is written keeping in mind developers who are new or less experienced with Netbeans 7 IDE.

This book contains 11 chapters.

The first chapter is targeted for novice Netbeans users, downloading and installing on different platforms. Experienced users can safely skip this section."NetBeans tips for effective development" is an useful section in this chapter; both for beginners as well as experienced Netbeans user.

Creating jsps, servlets, jspf are a breeze in Netbeans 7 using the GUI tools. The basics of this are covered in the second chapter. A good section on securing webapps, with different types of authentication supported for webapps is neatly covered.

Enhancing JSP Functionality with JSTL and Custom Tags chapter is an easy read. This chapter covers the basic of JSTL with sample examples. It also covers the CRUD operations using SQL JSTL tags (important for throwaway prototypes and quick development of DB apps).

Developing Web Applications using JavaServer Faces 2.0 chapter covers details on creating JSF projects primarily focussing on using Netbeans 7 IDE capabilities.
JSF concepts are covered only what is required from a Netbeans 7 usage point of view. Advanced concepts on JSF are not covered such as Lifecycle, phases etc. A couple of pages on this would have helped the reader to understand the big picture especially the beginners.

Then next chapter is devoted to the intro on PrimeFaces component library; which comes pre-bundled with Netbeans 7. Several features and examples are covered.

Interacting with Databases through the Java Persistence API is a very important chapter in the book. It covers the basics of JPA API and shows how Netbeans 7 can help to speed up the development of JPA applications. A complete example is explained covering from connecting to database to Entity relationships, named queries, validation and generating entity model from the existing database schema.

Implementing the Business Tier with Session Beans chapter covers basic intro to Session beans and very basic example on AOP (advanced conceptual features are left out).
But, all the features of Netbeans 7 IDE to create Session beans, Interceptors and deploying EJBs to Glassfish server are covered in detail.

The CDI chapter covers basics on creating CDI aware apps using Netbeans 7 GUI. Netbeans GUI makes it simple to create the CDI using wizards. All the features supported by the IDE for CDI capabilities are covered by the author with an practical example. Easy read.

Messaging with JMS and Message Driven Beans chapter starts with a basic intro on JMS. Netbeans 7 IDE generates all the boilerplate code for creating, sending and receiving JMS messages. An queue example with Glassfish server is highlighted in this chapter. For creating, testing and deploying JMS enabled apps, you never have to leave the Netbeans 7 IDE.

SOAP Web Services with JAX-WS and RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS are the last two chapters covering the two different flavors of Webservices supported by Java EE 6.
Netbeans 7 allows to modify web services via a graphical interface. All the boilerplate is neatly generated by Netbeans 7 IDE. These chapters include a simple examples on creating a Webservice, as well a simple client to consume the webservice. Author also shows how easy it is to expose existing Session EJB using Netbeans 7 as an Webservice. Although a more sophisticated example of using attachments and webservices security would have been very useful for the reader.

Couple of appendices at the end - Appendix A on using the Netbeans 7 debugger and Appendix B on using the Netbeans 7 profiler cover other important features supported by Netbeans IDE.

Targeted Audience:

The book is kind of basic tutorial on Java EE 6 using almost all the features supported by Netbeans 7 IDE. Naturally this book is for beginners (as well as intermediate developers) who want to switch to Netbeans and understand how to develop the new features of Java EE 6. Advanced concepts of Java EE 6 are not covered.

What missing (My opinion):

The author should have taken one example at the start of the book and chapter-wise added new features with increasing complexity to this example; somewhat mimicking real world project. This way, it would have been a little easier for the reader to grasp. Again this is my view. But the author has chosen the right example for each chapter to bring out all the features of the Netbeans 7.

The other missing part - A bit of unit testing using Netbeans 7 IDE (probably an Appendix) and couple of Ajax examples. These are kind of important in this agile era.

Conclusion

Overall it is a good book and would make an beginner to an adept Netbeans 7 user.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Java EE 6 Development with NetBeans 7 narrated, 26 Aug 2011
By 
Ivan Popov (Plovdiv, Bulgaria) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
I had the chance to make use of this book thanks to PACKT Publishing, and it really deserves a review.

I'll start with a little clarification. At first I was about to rate this book with 4 instead of 5. The 4 wouldn't be for the book's quality, but for its place in the overall galore that Amazon houses in its digital library. I mean, even "The Lord of the Rings" doesn't have full five. But in its own right the book is a little masterpiece. Every book has a goal, and this one has achieved it with such ease.
In short this is very fine balanced and fast paced introduction to the wonderful world of creating enterprise Java magic. And here you are given the spells for one powerful wand - the NetBeans IDE. The versions of the both tools (the SDK and the IDE) are the most current, and if we have to make a time-capsule for them, the book must be put in it.

Reading it (actually working through it) feels better than going through a set of cleverly compiled video tutorials. Better, because the book gives you a significant bit more than that. I have some experience with the enterprise Java, but I'm always happy to read some more good explanations of the technology. Here you have a lot of them. Let me give just a few examples:
The really slim introduction to building Java Server Faces applications in chapter 4, complemented with the equally small example of PrimeFaces component library integration into NetBeans in chapter 5.
The more extensive and full with code snippets explanations of the Java Persistence API in chapter 6. Here is one of my personal favorites - NetBeans is quite good in prototyping JSF applications through the JPA. That's possible and much easier thanks to the out-of-the-box Java BD integration. Even this chapter alone is a cornerstone tutorial on JPA with NetBeans.
The hyped new feature of Java EE 6, Context Dependency Injection, is covered in chapter 8. It represents almost seamless transition between the two chapters that discuss the integration of the two types of Enterprise JavaBeans left in the version 3.0 of the EJB specification - the Session and the Message-Driven ones. In these chapters you can see how ready NetBeans is for aspect-oriented development and how trivial can become creation of the code for JMS messaging enterprise applications.
The SOAP and RESTful web services implementations are explained through their current APIs (JAX-WS and JAX-RS correspondingly) in the last two chapters. Again - lots of code generation by the IDE, and especially for the web services it has a comfortable graphical designer.

All of the new sweetness in version 6 of Java Enterprise Edition is covered. And every given wizard is complemented not only with descriptions of its fields, why do you need them and what's the right thing to put in them. Beyond the bare minimum, you can find really helpful background information for the underlying technology. And once the intricacies of the API at hand were cleared, you are given the feeling that NetBeans really helps you in the best way to apply that API as soon as possible to your code.

What I really miss in this book is a bit more in-depth NetBeans. I think the author really had to show some template preparation through the Template Manager. You know, when you open the standard file templates in an editor and modify them to be closer to your needs every time you create new files. After all NetBeans itself is designed to encourage you for this.
Another core thing I didn't see here is the ability for making custom palettes with the Palette Manager. There is an extensive chapter-wide explanation of using the built in ones (even for the almost obsolete SQL JSP tags), but you haven't been shown the way to make your own palette from a library of your choice. Actually the Palette Manager is designed to help you create palettes for desktop components (Swing, etc.) and these are out of the scope of this book. But previously I've seen a plugin that creates palette for the IceFaces JSF components. Code completion for custom tags rocks, but the ability to create a palette for them at least deserves mentioning.
I think these both "missing" parts could form a nice, small Appendix C, besides the ones for Enterprise Applications Debugging and for the NetBeans Profiler (the IDE's integrated tool for code performance fine-tuning). But on the other hand (despite my wish), if the book was a little more dedicated to NetBeans than to Java EE 6, this would be a distraction from its focus and maybe it wouldn't achieve its primary goal so well.

All in all the book is great, because it's true to its purpose. I will definitely use it as a first class reference along with the knowledge base gathered at the site of the NetBeans IDE.Java EE 6 Development With NetBeans 7
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Java EE 6 Development with NetBeans 7 Review, 1 Aug 2011
This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
NetBeans is Oracle's (formerly Sun Microsystems's) open source pure Java integrated design environment (IDE). Since starting to program in Java I've tried a few free IDEs, Eclipse, JEdit and IntelliJ IDEA Community, but I believe non are currently as intuitive, feature rich, reliable and well integrated with Java EE technologies as NetBeans.

Packt Publishing requested that I review one of their new titles about NetBeans and JavaEE: JavaEE 6 Development with NetBeans 7 by David R. Heffelfinger, available to buy from Packt's website.

JavaEE 6 Development with NetBeans 7 is a very good book which complements a very good IDE. It has improved my usage of NetBeans and has brought me up to speed with the latest additions to the Java EE specification. I'm looking forward to the next project which will let me put into practice the new things I've learnt from this book. JavaEE 6 Development with NetBeans 7 covers the full JEE 6 stack, from first principals, with examples deployed on GlassFish application server.

The book focuses on the full JEE 6 technology range, including some elements which aren't used much anymore in production deployments (JSP SQL tags), but are there for the sake of thoroughness. Each part of the JEE stack has a chapter which is a great introduction to that topic, and will get you up and running with a usable example in no time at all.

No part of the stack is covered in great depth, but you wouldn't expect that from book only 360ish pages long. Each chapter provides a solid foundation for you get grips with the basics, and up and running with a working example, so you can feel confident in exploring further using other books or online sources if you wanted.

The book will appeal to a range of developers. If you are familiar with Java and wanted to learn JavaEE 6 development, this book would give a great start. If you are already a JEE developer and wanted to brush up on the new additions to the JEE standards than this book is a worthwhile read. Or if you're a developer, convinced that Eclipse, Spring, Hibernate and JBoss are the pinnacle of Enterprise Java development, then please give this book a try, it could be an eye opener.

The first chapter starts out by introducing the reader to NetBeans and it's JEE capabilities. You are shown where to download the IDE from, what bundle to choose from, and how to install it on your development platform; with information for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X. The chapter guides you through the installation procedure with excellent step by step screen shots (which are provided for every step in every example throughout the book), and how to start the IDE for the first time.

The book then goes through the steps to integrate NetBeans with other applications servers and databases in case you want to use JBoss or MySQL, but I decided to stick with GlassFish and Derby that come installed by default. To make sure everything is working, the books show you how to create a sample application, deploy to GlassFish and test it in your browser. Only a few pages into the book and you're up and running with a JavaEE web app - good stuff.

The remainder of the chapter details the developer productivity features that NetBeans provides, such as code completion, code templates, keyboard shortcuts and the editors visual queues; helpful stuff for knocking out the code faster and with fewer errors.

Chapter two covers how to create and deploy a simple JSP and Servlet application. The reader is guided thought how to modify the default new project code and how to create new HTML by dragging and dropping from NetBeans HTML palette. The Model-View-Controller design pattern is introduced and implemented, and authentication and authorisation are added to the application using GlassFish security realms, with form based authentication using a file realm. Finally the code is made more maintainable by using JSP fragments to reduce code duplication.

At only 100 pages into the book you have rapidly created a maintainable, secure and well architected web application!

Building on the previous chapter, chapter three introduces using JSP tags for conditional logic. SQL tags are introduced for querying and modifying data from a database, and the reader is rightly advised that a more robust method should be used for accessing the database in production systems. Custom tags are then used to encapsulate HTML mark-up and JSP functionality.

Chapter four introduces JavaServer Faces and chapter five builds on it with PrimeFaces. I've not used JSF since version 1.2 and was not familiar with PrimeFaces, so I was very impressed with the visual results achieved by the end of the two chapters. PrimeFaces and its AJAX capabilities are definitely something I want to explore further.

Chapter six contains some great information; it begins with how to access the database using the Java Persistence API, covering Entity Beans and how to annotate them. The Data Access Object pattern in demonstrated with JPA Controllers for encapsulating data access functionality. Now this is where NetBeans really starts to shine with respect to its code generation capabilities. The last half of the chapter shows how to generate Entities and Controllers from the database without having to manually write a line of code. Finally a whole JSF application for viewing and modifying the database data is generated from the Entity Beans. By the end of this chapter you can create a complete end-to-end data driven web application without writing a line of code. If you're a developer who is already familiar with the JPA, its worth giving this chapter a read for the new features introduced as part of JPA 2.0, such as the new JSR 303 Bean Validation annotations.

Chapter 7 covers how you will implement your business rules and domain logic in an EJB environment using session beans. The chapter guides us through creating remote stateless session beans and how their functionality can be access across the network from a client. Aspect Oriented Programming using Interceptors is introduced as well as the EJB Timer service for scheduling tasks. Again NetBeans code generation capabilities are used to automatically create session beans from our JPA entities, saving development time.

The new API introduced in Java 6 for dependency injection CDI (Contexts and Dependency Injection), is covered in chapter 8. This great new feature should simplify integrating different application layers, and improve the maintainability of your code. CDI scopes and the @Inject and @Named annotations are used in the examples along with Stereotypes to group together CDI code.

Messaging with JMS and message driven beans is covered in chapter nine. The chapter introduces Queues and Topics, message producers and consumers, and demonstrates how to implement a message Queue and receiver bean. NetBeans can generate the all boilerplate code required to use Message Driven Beans, taking the work out of creating loosely coupled architectures.

The final two chapters detail the usage of Web Services. Chapter ten covers how to create SOAP Web Services with JAX-WS, and chapter eleven RESTful Web Services with JAX-RS. The advantages of using web services as they are client platform agnostic are discussed before creating a web service by using the @WebService and @WebMethod annotations.

NetBeans graphical Web Service design interface is used to create a web service without having to manually write a WSDL file, and then tested with NetBeans web service testing features to view the XML messages sent backwards and forwards.

The rest of chapter ten shows us how to simple crate a SOAP client my dragging and dropping the Web Service methods on to a class, how to generate code to create a web service from an existing Session Bean and how to generate a web service from an existing WSDL.

The last chapter shows us how to generate the code to REST enable a database and create a client with just a few clicks.

Overall I think this is a great book. It contains the things that make me enthusiastic about Enterprise Java Development: EJB 3.1, JPA 2.0 and GlassFish. The book is well written and well structured; it flows from one chapter to the next, building on what you have learned before. The text is accurate and concise, and the screen shots throughout the book are so useful that you could follow most of the examples from them alone.

Most importantly, the code printed in the book is correct and easy to follow, I found no syntax errors in it.

The book should appeal to novice Enterprise Java developers as well as experienced programmers who want to brush up on the latest standards or need a firm foundation in an area of JEE they haven't covered before.

I'm looking forward to using some of the new things I've learned from the book in new projects. I hope the author continues to update the book in subsequent editions as and when the JEE standards evolve.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Netbeans vs EE 6... and the winner is Netbeans!, 12 Oct 2012
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This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
I have a background in EE developing, but mainly from previous EE versions and with another popular IDE, eclipse, so what I was really looking for was a quick way to get in touch with EE 6 and, at the same time, try netbeans and check how it fits my needs.

I think the book is too much about netbeans and less about EE 6 development, that's why I'm giving it just the 3 rating. A lot of paragraphs are on netbeans, do this in that menu, do that on this dialog, with images with it, which makes me believe, sometimes, that what I'm reading is a tutorial on netbeans.

A little more deep in the EE, and why do this and not that in EE, would be better, though.

Still, it's a quick way to get in touch with EE 6 with the help of netbeans 7. There's many examples and a lot of code to download.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's just OK, 15 Aug 2012
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This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
I don't normally write reviews but feel unhappy enough to write this one. Note that there is a "Who this book is for" section with 3 types of target reader and I'm none of these: I am very rusty with J2SE, new to J2EE but feel that there is no real added value by the author on the subject matter: I accept that my difficulties may be entirely down to my lack of J2EE skills/familiarity (YMMV).

It's a series of very short chapters filled out with screenshots and raw dumps of code which are not formatted well for a book: If code is indented heavily it should not be printed with overlapping lines coming in from the left; Perhaps the essential lines/structure would be better extracted so the pattern can be seen/followed instead - after all the code can be downloaded separately. Using a rough estimate 30-40% of the book is not a graphic or a code listing i.e. most of the book is one of the two.

It feels like the text has been padded out with these - if they were removed it would not be a very long book at all. Or perhaps it could be a thinner, cheaper book without them.

There is no real depth to the material i.e. each chapter is essentially a few screenshots with code listings guiding you through some NetBeans wizard to achieve some outcome - I suspect you may as well just work through the official J2EE 6 tutorial and save your money - which is what I wish I had done instead. Perhaps the title should reflect the NetBeans aspect more than J2EE.

In summary - Although you may get some exposure to using NetBeans Wizards with this book I suspect you will get no real understanding of J2EE beyond that you bring with you (BYOU) - again, see "Who this book is for". I suspect that J2EE experts could play around anyway and get there on their own with NetBeans/J2EE Tutorial anyway.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good introduction, 19 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
This is a good introduction to the subject, and clear even if you're not experienced in NetBeans or JavaEE. I did find that the latest version of NetBeans has slight dialogue changes compared to the screenshots but for the most part you can work around this with no difficulty.

I recommend this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Book. Very Good book. I loved read this book from end to end. Will have to get more books like this, 16 Dec 2013
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Mr. P. C. Chaston (UK) - See all my reviews
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Very Good Book. Very Good book. I loved read this book from end to end. Will have to get more books like this
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Coverage, 7 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
This book is very good for learning the more advanced Java EE support available in NetBeans 7. It also serves as a useful introduction to Java EE. Some of the code examples don't quite work but the errors are minimal and fairly simple to work out, plus full source code for the book can be downloaded which helps. This book will not make you a Java EE expert (for that you'll need to consult other sources like the Java tutorials from Oracle) but it is a good broad introduction to the features of Java EE.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended Reading, 25 Aug 2011
By 
D. SALTER (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) (Paperback)
Java EE 6 Development With NetBeans 7 aims to show developers how to write Java EE 6 applications using NetBeans 7. The book focuses on using GlassFish as the application server used for developing applications One of the most useful aspects of this book is that way that it teaches the reader how to use NetBeans as well as how to develop Java EE 6 applications. Whenever there are NetBeans features (for example shortcuts) that are pertinent to the development in question, these are explained with the end effect that the reader becomes more productive in NetBeans as well as in Java EE 6.

The book starts with taking an overview of NetBeans 7 showing how to download, install and configure the software. NetBeans 7 can be downloaded pre-configured to work with GlassFish and Java DB, but instructions are provided on how to install other applications servers (such as JBoss) and Databases (such as HSQL). Although other Java EE 6 application servers could be used throughout the book, the focus is on Java EE 6 itself rather than on the application server. I'd therefore recommend using GlassFish first and then re-reading if GlassFish isn't your preferred application server.

After introducing the reader to EE 6 development using NetBeans, there are several chapters that provide a learning trail for Web Development. First, JSPs are introduced and a simple application is developed using purely JSPs. The application is enhanced using servlets and JSTL implementing basic security along the way. For developers new to EE 6 development, these chapters provide a good overview of how Java web development used to be and give an appreciation of the underlying technologies used within web development. Fortunately web development has moved on from the basic JSP/Servlet model and we now have frameworks such as Java Server Faces and component libraries such as PrimeFaces. These are described at the end of web development section of the book showing how NetBeans offers first class support for both of these technologies.

What web application would be complete without the use of a database? Fortunately Java EE 6 provides the Java Persistence API. NetBeans offers excellent support for managing JPA and this is described in the book. The author doesn't go very deep into JPA (after all, there are entire books written about it), but provides enough details to allow developers to start learning and start using the features provided by NetBeans. Features such as creating entity classes from a RDBMS schema or generating JSF applications from JPA entities are all explained in detail.

In the next section of the book, the author describes how to implement EJBs for implementing business tiers with Session Beans and messaging solutions with Message Driven Beans. Again, plenty of code samples are provided together with tips on how to effectively use NetBeans. The new Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI) framework is also discussed showing how this can be used to integrate the business and presentation tiers of a Java EE application.

If you need to provide interoperability with non-Java EE based systems, then perhaps you need to look at Web Services. The final two chapters of the book provide an overview of how developers can use NetBeans to write both SOAP and RESTful web services using JAX-WS and JAX-RS. Development of web services is one of the areas where the combination of GlassFish and NetBeans provides a superior developer experience to other environments. The ability to develop and modify web services using simple wizards (or via code if you don't like wizards) and then easily deploy and test is one of the key advantages of Oracle's Java EE 6 Development/Deploy environment. As in the rest of the book, there are plenty of samples and the descriptions are informative and easy to understand.

Recommended reading for anyone wishing to learn NetBeans and Java EE 6.
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Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled)
Java Ee 6 Development with Netbeans 7 (Community Experience Distilled) by David Heffelfinger (Paperback - 17 Jun 2011)
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