Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A really good book: worth it.
If you are a law student at college/university or you simply want all the relevant information about becoming a barrister, then I'll suggest you pick up this book. I found this book very useful and it does explain all that you need to know about becoming a barrister. It gives information about practise areas, academic stages,the inns of court, the bar vocatinal course...
Published on 23 Oct 2008 by book_critic

versus
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A CAREER IN PURE THEATRE
I RECOMMEND U STUDY ACTING WHILE ON UR COURSE ALL U WILL NEED IS TO STUDY GREEK TRAGEDY AND SHAKESPEARE.ALTHOUGH SOME CULTURES MAY FIND THIS ALIEN TO THEIR SENSIBILITIES.U WILL NEED TO BN A CONVINCING LIAR AND MANIPUTATION SKILLS.SO GD LUCK IN THE CAREER U DESERVE
Published 5 months ago by CENTRAL LONDON MAN


Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A really good book: worth it., 23 Oct 2008
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are a law student at college/university or you simply want all the relevant information about becoming a barrister, then I'll suggest you pick up this book. I found this book very useful and it does explain all that you need to know about becoming a barrister. It gives information about practise areas, academic stages,the inns of court, the bar vocatinal course (BVC), pupillage,employment and much more. It also states real stories from different barristers about their typical working week.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No longer Bewildered!, 22 May 2009
By 
Undoubtedly, there is much secrecy and legal jargon surrounding the legal profession. The author sets out to dispell certain myths, but still outlines the reality of this hugely competitive occupation. Most helpful are the links to websites, books and other resources, to get you started, not to mention 'Rumpole of the Bailey', to which i am now addicted. Kramer surely succeeds in bringing legal amateurs out of the dark, into the fascinating world of law, courts and even the dress code!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic!, 4 July 2010
This book was very helpful and very informative. It allows you to understand all the ins and outs of the legal proffession as well as an indepth description of those workers affiliated with barristers at work. Must read for all those wanting to pursue this career or a carrer in law overall.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very useful guide., 26 April 2011
By 
Woyee (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a very useful guide to becoming a barrister. Covers all the areas one is likely to have questions about.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A jargon-busting guide to modern brothers (and sisters) in law ... with great updates!, 12 Dec 2008
By 
Phillip Taylor (Richmond Upon Thames, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Length:: 2:49 Mins

SECOND EDITION:

THE WANNABE BARRISTER'S BIBLE: BUY IT NOW

An Appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor from Richmond Green Chambers

Wannabe a barrister? Then read this superb little book first. You will be reliably, knowledgeably and entertainingly well informed as to what you're letting yourself in for - and once you've made it -- how to get ahead and stay ahead in this challenging profession. We, and any other barristers we know who have read this book (recently released in a second edition by Hart Publishing), only wish it had existed when they were starting out. It's a veritable treasure trove of hints and advice as to what to do and just as importantly, what not to do if want to become a barrister.

The Bar - in this case, of England and Wales -- is one of the most interesting professional careers in the world as we know it, but nonetheless a career path fraught with problems, many of them those of other people. It all starts in earnest, not necessarily when you acquire your academic qualifications - that's the easy bit - but when you aspire to acquiring pupillage, (the barristers' apprenticeship). Well, that's another matter!

Note the author's warning that around a third to a half of all applicants who apply in any one year have no real chance of getting pupillage. However, if you still think you can make it and want to have a go despite these gloomy odds, this book provides invaluable guidance as to how you can reach your goal.

Not only will you learn more about the traditions, terminology and institutions of the Bar, you'll also experience life at the Bar as it is actually lived - vicariously, of course -- via the personal anecdotes of several barristers practicing in several different fields. Emphasis on the practical is one of the many delights of this book.

Considering the amount of painstaking research, effort and organisation that has gone into the writing of this book, Adam Kramer has certainly performed a sterling service for aspiring barristers everywhere. Take a look especially at the suggestions for further research and enquiry and the incredibly useful websites mentioned.

In addition, the author includes advice on transferring to the Bar from your present career, plus suggestions for alternative career paths if you decide that the Bar is not really for you. Note that this second edition is fully up to date to account for recent changes to the Bar as we enter a period of further major review.

FIRST EDITION

This is a very much needed book, with useful online updates, for anyone interested in becoming a barrister-at-law in England and Wales in 21st century. There has always been a certain amount of mystique about the Bar and what we actually do. Adam Kramer has been able to distill the work we do in a matter-of-fact way as though he were addressing a jury- and he puts the issues across very finely indeed with most questions answered.

Ex Bar Chairman, Stephen Hockman, introduces the book in a very friendly manner and then launches into the realities of life at the Bar and the sort of problems we are facing at the moment. He concludes that `I only wish it had been available to me when I started in practice 35 years ago' thereby identifying that today we have many new entrants to the profession from `outside' so they will not know much of the intricacies of professional life gleaned from parents and relatives. This is a good thing because it shows the broad base which gives the Bar its unique talents for today. And, of course, this sort of book is needed as it explains all those little things which happen which appear a bit odd to `outsiders' but are part of the traditions of the legal profession (and they work otherwise we would have got rid of them!).

The book has 14 fact-filled chapters, and a most useful 'further information' section at the back to go with the glossary, index and `timetables for routes to the Bar'. Probably the two biggest issues to be faced are well covered by Kramer: all aspects of money from paying fees to earnings; and `can you do the job?' With the regular suggestions of change to the way barristers are trained, I would expect more emphasis on continuous professional development and reflective practice at the Bar in future editions to meet current policy directives from our regulators.

Since the book appeared, the Legal Services Act 2007 was given Royal Assent on 30th October 2007, and we are still assessing the main implications for reform so read the updates online.

Clearly more changes will follow and I hope that readers will not be put off by some of the statistics produced by Kramer on `success rates' for pupillage, quoting 2004 levels with 1,251 passes for the BVC, and only 556 pupillages available.

Since then, notwithstanding diversity policy which has failed, the situation has declined markedly and it would seem that big changes will have to take place to ensure that we have a sufficient supply of new barristers `in stock' to balance wastage. The message comes clearly through that it is in the interests of no-one to see the Bar wound up and merged into some form of trial lawyer section of a big firm of City solicitors.

So, do not be put off when you read this book! Kramer writes "it will then be for the reader, who knows his or her character and circumstances, to decide whether to seek to become a barrister". Yes, he has succeeded in giving an understanding of the process by which a person wants to become a barrister at a time of numerous (yet incomplete) changes to the system. No book can ever give you the reality of what it is like to do pupillage as some many are so different.

My pupillage was before the rules changed, and it was in a common law set with a general and varied practice whereas much training today will be in highly specialized areas of great value to the paying client.

I was also lucky to have had a small drama scholarship and, with the two professions have much in common concerning fame, fortune and the daily grind of `jobbing' work, it was of help because pupillage selection committees often look for the `rounded person' who does not necessarily come from a straight legal background. The rewards are there and, for me, work at the Bar is giving fair representation to the under-privileged (that is, most of us) who have absolutely no idea about what those `guys in wigs' do. You do now, with Kramer's great pocket guide on being bewigged but no longer bewildered.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, 11 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Bewigged and Bewildered?: A Guide to Becoming a Barrister in England and Wales (Paperback)
This book is very informative, my daughter is studying Law and says the book is clear and precise and just what she needed to help her understand the progression.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dan Freeth a first year law student at Plymouth University, 17 Dec 2011
This review is from: Bewigged and Bewildered?: A Guide to Becoming a Barrister in England and Wales (Paperback)
I am a student at the University of Plymouth. Deciding whether to become a barrister or a solicitor is a bit of a decision and reading this book as really helped me to decide which career path to undertake.

I really would recommend any who has this decision to make, is to read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A CAREER IN PURE THEATRE, 8 Feb 2014
This review is from: Bewigged and Bewildered?: A Guide to Becoming a Barrister in England and Wales (Paperback)
I RECOMMEND U STUDY ACTING WHILE ON UR COURSE ALL U WILL NEED IS TO STUDY GREEK TRAGEDY AND SHAKESPEARE.ALTHOUGH SOME CULTURES MAY FIND THIS ALIEN TO THEIR SENSIBILITIES.U WILL NEED TO BN A CONVINCING LIAR AND MANIPUTATION SKILLS.SO GD LUCK IN THE CAREER U DESERVE
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Bewigged and Bewildered?: A Guide to Becoming a Barrister in England and Wales
15.00
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews