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2.2 out of 5 stars25
2.2 out of 5 stars
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on 15 March 2015
An inappropriately heavy-handed political treatise smuggled into a pretty shonky plot as a misguided attempt to indoctrinate the masses into being complicit in their own children's subjugation.

Regardless of your politics (and the polarising nature of this book, as shown by the reviews, illustrates how keen we all our to hand them on to our children) you cannot deny the fundamental flaw in this fable: Denver's status as one of the "deserving rich" is implied by his reaffirmation as head-honcho in the second town he makes his home. But in real life the majority of society's wealthy are not self-made genii occupying unassailable and deserving positions of wealth and prosperity; they are hand-me-downs from better, luckier, or more manipulative ancestors. In real life it's far likelier Denver would have rotted in a ditch and, in time, another Denver would have risen to take his place.

Children of the intended-age readership will all be baffled by this book. I recommend "Cheese Belongs to You!" by Alexis Deacon & Viviane Schwarz as a far more satisfying allegory of how the world really works.
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on 18 August 2015
the obvious political steam train made me wince. i hope even my children will see through that. but the "don't listen to discontent" ending is sinister. was this written for the white south africa or slavery days usa or pre female votes or what. discontent can be for a good reason especially in children. bad message in this book. I guess its useful to teach kids not to believe everything they read...
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on 19 August 2011
Attracted by the artwork and quirky cover character, I was completely disgusted by the message of this book. The fundamental idea is thus: don't share, don't question the rich, don't ever aspire to more than you have, be happy as a servile peasant. This is completely inappropriate for the age group targeted
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on 21 March 2016
Simply astonishing that this book made it past editors, publishers and the criterati without anyone picking up that it was the Tory manifesto in picture book form. It's worse actually, its the kind of Milton Friedman extreme right economics that nowadays noone publicly espouses. Trickle-down all the way and don't try to change anything. Not worth the paper it's now recycled on.
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on 9 November 2012
Great illustrations but really unpleasant story. Seems to say don't redistribute wealth to the poor, they'll only waste it! Very white population too!
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on 11 February 2012
I was so disappointed by this book as the message is terrible- know your place and don't question the rich, rich people are kind and look after their wealth. Poor people are foolish with money and don't know a good thing when they have one. It tells us directly to not question the distribution of wealth. It has changed my viewpoint of the author whose books I have loved to share with my daughter.
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on 16 March 2016
The charming fairy tale of trickle down economics. Can't wait for the uplifting workhouse-based follow-up fable.
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on 4 September 2010
We got this out of the library, simply spotting that it was David McKee, which is usually good value. Having read it once, it'll be going back to the library as soon as possible. Whilst capitalism may or may not have its merits, I think that this book is aimed at children too young to consider them in an informed and rational manner.
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on 21 October 2012
I read this book today to my god children and was absolutely stunned. I thought I must be completely stupid and not get it but jumped on Amazon tonight and was vindicated to see the reviews here on Amazon. So it's not just me.

Basically the theme of this book is that we should be thankful to all the wonderful generous rich people and if not they'll leave us and the land we live in will be awful and we'll not be happy. I'm pleased to say my god children are 5 year old twins and a but too young to get it. It's now in the bin.

It's god one star from me because Amazon doesn't let you do zero.
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on 18 August 2011
My 3-year-old borrowed this from the library. We didn't read it until we got home or I would never have taken it out. The plot: Everyone loves good, generous Mr. Rich Man, whose wealth trickles down to support the whole village economy, until a Bad Troublemaker ruins everything by talking them into some wealth redistribution. But it's okay, because the peasants deserve to suffer for their greed and Mr. Rich Man, who gets rich again by becoming an artist (talk about fantasy!), moves to a different village where they appreciate him. Hooray for rich people!
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