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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A most unjudgemental, unfundamentalist, atheism
I found this a most absorbing read, particularly because though I agreed with the rationale behind much of it I did also find myself arguing, enjoyably rather than angrily, as there are manifestations of `supersense' which I believe he rather ignores, dismissing certain things which exist and there have been statistical studies on (e.g. telepathy)

Hood...
Published on 20 Mar. 2012 by Lady Fancifull

versus
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sense or supersense?
Hood is the Director of the Cognitive Development Centre at the University of Bristol. He has written a fascinating account of his theory that the human mind is `hardwired' towards a belief in the supernatural, which manifest itself in the propensity of peoples in all ages and cultures to adopt beliefs which range from superstition to profound religious viewpoints. Though...
Published on 27 Jun. 2009 by Kevin G. Tingay


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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 29 Sept. 2014
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This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
a very informative book, promptly delivered
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8 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Promises much but delivery a bit thin, 16 Aug. 2009
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This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
I heard Bruce Hood talking on Radio 4 and was sufficiently interested in what he had to say to buy his book - after all, a popular science writer engaging on the question of *why* we are impelled to believe in the supernatural, rather than intolerantly railing about how deluded people are that do, seemed like a healthy change. And Hood sets his book up nicely with some queasy dilemmas that will trouble not just the delusional among us: would *you* feel comfortable wearing Fred West's cardigan? I know I wouldn't.

Hood's thesis is that, through evolution or fiat, our brains are disposed - wired, if you like - to think this way, and along with the blindingly irrational proclivities that so exercise Richard Dawkins come many useful survival strategies. To throw out the bathwater risks losing the baby, Hood implies, and I think he would say the bath doesn't have a plug in any case: We couldn't change this aspect of our cognitive faculties even if we wanted to.

For all its intriguing premise it's a somewhat laboured book which sets its premise out early and then takes an inordinate amount of time to move beyond it, and in the mean time Hood allows himself to be sidetracked too easily, at one point indulging in a lengthy but granted interesting disquisition on the historical antecedents of the Dracula story, to no obvious point.

There is much to be mined in the observation that, for all our enlightened rationalist protestations, collectively and individually we still behave bizarrely most of the time - so perhaps there is something to be said for leavening the will to rationality that has been behind much modern economics, biology and sociology - and while this book glances in that direction it never really casts a longing stare there, and ultimately is of passing interest rather than genuine clout.

Olly Buxton
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but no great revelations, 22 Jun. 2009
By 
MR "Matayp" (STOCKPORT, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
This book is a very interesting read on the topic of superstitious beliefs and the idea that they originate from a side effect of our ability to reason. I would recommend it to others but I would say that it does not really hit on any earth shattering revelations in this area particularly if you have read anything about this topic previously.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read, funny and interesting, 28 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
I loved reading this book. Although the physical condition of the book was not as good as I might have expected, the content was amusing and educational.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not sure it is as good..., 15 Oct. 2013
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as some other books in this religious bash group but very interesting to hear how the brain works. well done buce
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 1 Sept. 2014
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6 of 26 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A lack of insight, 24 May 2012
By 
Vincent Van Wyk (Johannesburg, South Africa) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
Like a lot of psychology, this book is befuddled. There has never been a clear demarcation link between philosophy and pscyhology and I wish this blurr could be properly emphasized. This author invokes the spirit of David Hume at one point without even understanding him. So much has been written on religion from a philosophical point of view and serious readers are advised to skip this shallow attempt and rather read Dialogues on natural religion by David Hume. The link is Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, and The Natural History of Religion (Oxford World's Classics)
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0 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent service., 28 Nov. 2010
The book didn't take quite as long to come come from Canada as I'd expected. A very good price for a brand new hard back
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1 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars interesting but..., 28 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Supersense: From Superstition to Religion - The Brain Science of Belief (Paperback)
I'm not going to go into a great depth here - overall this book is written in a friendly and nice manner,
but there are a couple of things which had caught my eye:

a; factual imprecisions (eg. p184 where Elisabeth Bathory is a Romanian placed in Romania instead of a Hungarian living in what is now Slovakia;)
b,omitting certain facts (in chapter about homeopathy the author comes to a conclusion that it's all just placebo -
surprise surprise - yet completely ignored the fact that homeopathy works on babies and animals,hm....)

One thing is for sure - science will never acknowledge certain things, since its basic premise is wrong. For this reason alone it should not take its holier-than-thou position.

I've just read something which shows precisely what I mean:
'It wasn't that the world built upwards to become more spiritual but that the spiritual descended, merging with the world. The world of material things was not the pinnacle of existence so much as mere precipitate, a cooling deposit from a great rushing wind.'
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