Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Oasis Listen with Prime Learn more Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars201
4.4 out of 5 stars
Format: Hardcover|Change
Price:£7.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

TOP 500 REVIEWERon 5 August 2011
It's about time a novel was written about this fascinating emperor - spymaster to Lindsey Davis' Falco, key to the invasion of Britannia and builder of the Colosseum. The 99p kindle price didn't hurt either. I'm so glad I spent it. Fabbri takes us back to the young Vespasian, looking after his father's estates in the provinces. As he gets a little older it's time for him to add military experience to administrative knowhow and he and his rather unpleasant brother set off for Rome in search of the right posting to secure honour and wealth for their family. Mixing with the elite of Rome, it's not long before the young men are caught up in the intrigues of the court of Tiberius, most of which circle around Sejanus and Antonia who are mortal enemies.

When Vespasian, with the eager help of none other than Caligula, rescues Antonia's captive maid from the clutches of Sejanus, he has no choice but to flee Rome with the Praetorian Guard at his heels and his thug of a bodyguard Magnus for company. He heads for Thracia and, in a case of jumping out of the frying pan into the fire, earns his military boots facing a massive rebellion of the local tribes. There is no escape from Rome's intrigue even here as Vespasian questions the role of Rome's leaders in the revolt.

Vespasian is an immensely exciting book. Its second half is full of battles, mixed with the intense hours waiting for the first blows. The first half, however, can match it, notably with a brutal chariot race and the machinations of court life. The book is full of meticulous and fascinating knowledge that brings the streets and blocks of the city of Rome to life, as well as the countryside, roads and military camps of the empire. Vespasian's story is in extremely capable hands and I look forward to the next chapter in his life.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 July 2011
A very good read this. The author clearly has a genuine love of the historical setting and this shone through in some of the detail. The narrative was smooth and the characters likeable and I found the chemistry between Vespasian and Magnus humorous and memorable.
There were some issues with flat dialogue early on, where a lot of backstory seemed to be conveyed through unrealistic sounding conversations, but overall this was a tiny blip on an enjoyable journey.

Well worth a read for hist fic fans
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 July 2011
Like other reviewers I am a fan of Scarrow's Cato and Macro and approached this with some trepidation. It was however simply brilliant. It was pleasing to have Roman cavalry and tactics included in the battle scenes as this an area in which I am particularly interested and which is often overlooked by other authors. As a Roman historian and reenactor I found nothing significantly inaccurate. Vespasian is my favourite emperor, I can't wait to see how his career is developed by Mr Fabbri.
11 comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 May 2011
Great debut by Robert Fabbri.The story rattles along at a cracking pace.I have read numerous books of this type Scarrow,Stack,Sidebottom,Kane,Riches and Maddox Roberts to name a few and now Fabbri is a name to add to the list.Whilst I am not an authority on ancient Rome Fabbri Makes you feel as if he is.Really looking forward to the next episode.Strongly recommend this book.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 November 2011
As a big fan of Simon Scarrow, Conn Iggudenn et al I'm always on the look out for new authors to fill the gaps between their latest offerings. For a first book I've got to say, Robert Fabbri take a bow, it kept me gripped from start to finish. I've put a note in the diary for the next installment in May 2012.
A little message for Simon and Conn, time to sharpen your pencils boys, there's a new kid on the block!!!
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 May 2011
HISTORICAL fiction-wise, Rome never seems to date. Your Iggulden, Scarrow and truly masterful Leckie rank among the legion of greats in this fascinating part of the past, and now Robert Fabbri is bidding to place his standard among them.
A TV man of 25 years, he knows how to create that picture in the mind's eye as he opens his account with the life of Vespasian, a man who was part of the invasion of Britain and later became emperor.
This first in a series deals with his birth to his battles as a young man in a world where teenagers were on first-name terms with death.
Growing up fast he faces physical and mental trials as he joins and rises through the legionary ranks. And Fabbri makes sure we feel every inch of anguish and agony.
A fantastic debut with the promise of thumping great reads to come.
0Comment|7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 October 2011
I bought this book to go on holiday with It was so good I had finished on by the end of the first day. The story is very immersive and captivates the reader in a Roman world brilliantlly created by Robert Fabbri. The books pace increases as it goes on and i began to find myself woth the inability to put my kindledown. Buy this book if you are looking for a beutiful story with well created characters.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 May 2011
This was a cracking debut book from Robert Fabbri. It is a well written and a well paced book which kept me hooked for the whole day.
He has developed the characters and created an interesting partnership between Vespasian and Magnus which I hope he develops further. I look forward to the next book.

Tribune of Rome (Vespasian)
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 November 2012
This is the first in an intended series of a fictionalised version of the life of one of the most interesting Roman emperors. It is a good solid start. Starting when he is a teenager, the story gradually takes him nearer to the centre of power, and those who wield it.
The author does a good job of keeping up the pace of the story, whilst developing Vespasian's character, and his relationships with many of the people who will be important in the rest of his life - some friends, some enemies. He does well to show how Vespasian grows in stature, and learns to deal with those around him without it being too obvious, and this is quite a skill for a first time author.
I am looking forward to the next episode with interest.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 September 2011
Suprisingly good (as I bought it cos it was cheap at []p). Well written and obviously well researched. Very easy to read & entertaining, as well as giving you a believable idea of life at that time. Can't wait for next one.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.