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7 of 25 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 23 July 2011
Dr Johnson said of cucumber that, after elaborate dressing, it should be discarded as worth nothing. And so with Willett's premise and argument. Begging your pardon, sir, I lived (born 1947 to UK forces parents) in a bombed shell of a tenement for years - the years which saw the appearance of the NHS and much else to be proud of. I achieved much and contributed much to the society which a past government did so much to undermine. Give back what we earned? No, for I have, of choice, no children. Live in misery? Why? No, we've had our fill of prophets of doom. We don't need any more of you to see us out of our twilight years. Get back to the bomb-shelter, Mr Willetts, light a gas lamp or candle and rethink. What has been done can be done again, regardless of your soothsaying. I leave the last word on your dreary work with its dubious arguments to an ex-Cabinet colleague of yours: that, on reading the book, she felt an urge to throw it across the room. Yes, more than a bit like Johnson's cucumber, but with this difference: cucumber is edible. Go and try again.
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7 of 26 people found the following review helpful
I bought this book thinking that it would give me an inside into my own generation and how "the grey pound" was being used at the expense of younger generations.

What I found was a very "veiled" excuse for a politician to blame the party in power at the time for everything that was wrong with the world. I found it very political within the first few pages which completely put me off the book. Not at all what I expected and was very disappointed with this book.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 5 April 2014
I hated this book, I put it down, and discarded it for ever and ever. I then found out who the writer was and that clinched it.
UGH FOOY.
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18 of 70 people found the following review helpful
on 1 March 2010
This is undoubtedly an interesting book and a fascinating contribution to the current financial debate, if only because it is written by a politician who is highly likely to be involved in the next government of the UK in one way or another. There is, however, a major problem with a work: Willetts suggests that the greatest inequality in contempory UK society exists between generations. This is utter rubbish. The greatest inequality exists within generations. For those with wealth there is already a substantial passing on equity between generations...
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4 of 23 people found the following review helpful
on 25 February 2011
Love to read this on Kindle, but the publishers are having a laff if they think I'll buy an ebook at that price.
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3 of 21 people found the following review helpful
The Pinch and the other books from David Willets are just recycled regurgitated nonsence he picked up from his Politics, Philosophy and Economics degree. As far as the world around him is concerned he lives in a sheltered monotone where he is paid by foundations to recite the same old dogmas. There is nothing new here, just the same drab wasteful nonsense from the guy who cut the science budget to feul his creative arts obsessions. When the double dip recession hits, the pinch will become a punch to everyone who doesn't run away.

If you really care about the young generation, tip them in a cafe shop dont take money away from them and give it to this man, who has done nothing to deserve it.
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