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3.4 out of 5 stars8
3.4 out of 5 stars
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on 28 September 2009
I don't think J. Harrison read the same book that I did! 'About Time' is a witty, funny and incisive look at the wonders and perils of growing older. I love the way Kurtz writes and her stories of her family were adorable, as were the short vignettes from the other contributors. Sure, there were moments of reflection, but heck, let's face it, growing old is rather disconcerting (to say the least!) and anyone who can make something positive of the experience, as Kurtz does with verve and humor in this book, gets my vote.
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VINE VOICEon 26 September 2009
Irma Kurtz writes with wit and intelligence, perception and emotion, summing up so many of the little idiosyncrasies of old age, and revelling in the advantages of not being under 60 any more. Her Jewish background informs and entertains the more generalised whole, and the pace of book never falters. A great read for the over 60s which I can thoroughly recommend for winter evenings, holiday relaxation, easy reading for travelling, in fact any time. You won't be disappointed. Irma Kurtz had a light approach, choosing her words accurately and carefully, which has one nodding in agreement and empathy right the way through.

Younger readers take note that you may not be familiar with all those things that happened when your parents/grandparents were young but this book might be quite educational in the nicest way about some of the lighter aspects of the previous generations.
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on 20 August 2009
Another excellent read from Irma Kurtz.
General musings on life and ageing told
in a humorous manner and with other's
insights included along the way. I would
recommend this an ideal book to encourage
you to not take thing's for granted.
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on 30 December 2011
I greatly enjoyed reading this book. I felt that it was a wryly honest account of the travels of an indomitable lady. The writing was fluid and expressive. My interest was engaged throughout, and on several occasions I was moved to laughter. This is the only one of Irma's books that I have read so far, but I am now on the lookout for more.

Louise Gillett
Author of 'Surviving Schizophrenia: A Memoir'.
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on 11 September 2009
Reading this book is very much like sitting on a long-haul flight next to an irritating old woman. It is a prime example of someone mistaking their opinions for wisdom. In that sense, I suppose, Irma Kurtz is the Jeremy Clarkson of her generation. Older does not necessarily mean wiser, as you would discover if you read this dreary book. Irma's life, though mildly interesting, has not been interesting enough to justify inflicting it's tale on the rest of us. I really didn't need to be told that the price of property in London has increased massively, nor that young people are not respectful of the elderly in the UK the way they are in other cultures. A couple of the contributions from other old folk are mildly amusing, most are self indulgent and uninteresting (nice trick though, when one's own life has been too dull to fill a book, get other dullards to chip in a few pages). Also, and I know this is not Irma's fault but that of her publisher, I feel (not for the first time, I admit) somewhat duped by the cover note comparing Kurtz to Bryson. She isn't in the same league as Bryson, in fact I don't think they are even playing the same sport!

Therefore, I am delighted that I borrowed this book from a friend. Not because I enjoyed reading it, but rather that had I shelled out my hard earned cash for it, I'd be even more disappointed.

If you want a book by an `oldster' to entertain and enlighten, then rush off now to buy `Resident Alien' by Quentin Crisp. Drenched in wit, and dropping pearls of wisdom faster than a pensioner can say "I remember when all this was fields", Quentin remains, for me, the ultimate oldster in harness.
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on 3 August 2014
Not a very interesting book at all. I've read far funnier detailing 'getting old'.
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on 30 January 2010
Don't judge this book by its jolly cover. Irma is younger than me and I don't recognise her miserable old age. Was she any different when young? She talks to people on public transport - spare me please. She is boring. She is scraping the barrel to find something to say. Don't waste your time on it.

Psyche
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on 1 September 2009
I would love nothing more than to review this book but it seems that amazon.co.uk are finding it impossible to send to me. It hasn ow been despatched twice and failed to arrive each time! I am loath to order again despite the fact that I really would like to read this book as I am a great fan of Irma Kurtz.
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