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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full of passion, youth and poetic love for the sky
This is possibly the best aircraft related war memoir I have ever read. Cecil Lewis is a wordsmith in his own right, he lived to be 98 and became a successful BBC broadcaster. He wrote this book later on in life, but not from an adult perspective only just how he fell at the time as a 17 year old youth joining the Royal Flying Corps. It's full of love for flying, full of...
Published on 30 Sep 2008 by D. Ross

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars The Curate's egg
Very good in parts but utterly self indulgent & neither good nor coherent in others. It would have been far better if he had not dwelt so intensely on his China experience.
Published 3 months ago by A. Beverley


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full of passion, youth and poetic love for the sky, 30 Sep 2008
By 
D. Ross "DrDanger" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
This is possibly the best aircraft related war memoir I have ever read. Cecil Lewis is a wordsmith in his own right, he lived to be 98 and became a successful BBC broadcaster. He wrote this book later on in life, but not from an adult perspective only just how he fell at the time as a 17 year old youth joining the Royal Flying Corps. It's full of love for flying, full of passion and knowledge of the machines, full of feelings that will take you on an emotional rollercoaster and make you laugh and cry as you read through this magnificent masterpiece of a memoir.
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps the best First World War Fighter pilot memoir, 14 April 2001
This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
Cecil Lewis is above all gifted writer. He gives the reader a rare insight into the life of a young man during the first world war and shortly afterwards.
A "bit of a Poet" he tells us of his experience as he trains to be a pilot and then during active duty.
This memoir lets us see through his eyes what live was like. Perhaps we see it better for he has a keen eye for detail and is both sensitive and perceptive.
The flying and combat scenes are perhaps the best ever written.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the classics, 23 April 2009
By 
Mark Wildish (Norway) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
There are not many books which give first hand accounts of the air war in the first world war - there were not many who survived. Cecil Lewis was not only a survivor - against the odds - he was also a writer of talent. The backdrop which is provided of youthful exuberance, combined with the sense of duty, helps explain why young men continued to accept and face up to the near certainty of death. This is not just a book about the air war, it is a eulogy to a lost cast.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Rate First-hand account of First World War Flying, 26 Sep 2011
This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
I bought this because I was reading another book called Fighter Boys which is a well researched account of the development of the RAF leading up to a detailed account of the Battle of Britain. In the early stages of the book the author frequently cited Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis as one of the best accounts we have of flying in the first world war, and it certainly lives up to that description. Cecil Lewis joined the RFC as soon as he could in the very early stages of WW1 and seems to have led a charmed life, being on active service in the RFC as a pilot throughout the war, carrying out duties as an airborne observer for the artillery, flying photographic reconnaisance missions over enemy territory, and being involved in dogfights including encountering von Richtofen's circus. The book is punctuated with his philosphical musings about war and civilisation which are as relevant to-day as they were then. An excellent well written account which is also very informative on the rapid development of aviation technology during the war.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of the finest war memoirs, and unique in WW1 aviation, 5 Dec 2009
By 
Richard Budd (Brixton, London) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
The above superlatives are all appropriate. I want to add that the technicalities are good enough for pilots without baffling laymen, and his description of the extreme difficulty of keeping his Morane Parasol the right side up, for example, is a masterly illustration of the perennial balancing act in military aircraft between lethality and safety, in other words, hoping they kill more of them than they do of us. Photos would have been good, and the edition I had was a facsimile of an early edition, meaning there was no postscript on what became of Lewis himself, or commentaries and footnotes by a historian, which would also have been nice to have.I am afraid, Mukisa, they really did think it was "ripping" to go to war -- at first, of course -- and a lot of memoirs only got written in the 1930s because the veterans did not at first believe that anyone but other veterans could possibly understand what they experienced.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sagittarius Rising, 1 July 2014
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I have come back to this classic after 30 years and like a fine wine, it has improved with the keeping! It is, without doubt, one of the finest books in the aviator's library.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars not perfect, but well worth a read, 7 Jun 2009
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This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
A unique book, for sure, and a wonderful insight into the lifestyle of WW1 fighter pilots. But I can't rave about it as the other reviwers seem to have done. Some of Lewis' writing is overly sentimental, such as when he talks about his various love affairs - for me, this was neither relevant nor very interesting. There's also an element of Boy's Own in his style, such as the faintly ridiculous "Wouldn't it be ripping!", as he and his friend (aged 17) decide excitedly to sign up for the Flying Corps. More critically, most of the text was written from memory, a full 18 years after the war ended, which must cast some doubt on the details of the discussions and descriptions that he includes. One final criticism, this time of the publishers: Lewis talks lovingly about the many different types of aircraft that he flew, but for nearly all readers (myself included), it is impossible to have a mental picture of these long-gone machines. Could they not have included some photos?

These critiques aside, I felt by the end that I would have greatly enjoyed the company of Cecil Lewis. This sense came not so much from his descriptions of the War - extraordinary though they were - but from what he wrote towards the end of the book about his time training (or trying to train) Chinese pilots in Peking in the early 1920s. He was a sensitive observer of people, and I appreciated his genuine appreciation of the Chinese. At a time when most of the British expatriates there were fairly disdainful of their host nation, his attitude was that of a very substantial person, as well as - at least in this respect - rather a humble one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling autobiography of a Royal Flying Corps surivor, 21 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
This reads like 'Forrest Gump' - but this character is for real: fighting and surviving the First World War then going on to set up the BBC. Most amazing of all is that Cecil Lewis was interviewed at length in 1964 for the BBC Series 'The Great War' so you can hear an introduction to this work in the author's own words.
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5.0 out of 5 stars best book of it's type?, 12 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Sagittarius Rising (Paperback)
This book thoroughly deserves it's reputation as a good read. The style is fresh and evocative, and the era comes out, as well as the combat.
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4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best first chapters you will ever read, 27 May 2014
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The first chapter in this book is one of the best that I have ever read. The main body of the book covers the authors training on very basic trainer aircraft and charts his progression as a pilot through-out the war, covering a couple of tours on the western front and also on the home front. I found the chapters about the home front particularly interesting as I have always viewed the air war during this period as a particularly French affair. The book also charts the rapid technological development of aircraft during this thankfully relatively brief period of our history, and also covers the transition from Royal Flying Corps to the inception of the Royal Air Force.

The Author seems to come from a relatively privileged background, and his writing style is of his era and social class. However, the book does not really suffer for this, and the author comes across as a decent, honest person, doing his best under circumstances most of us can only really begin to imagine.

Towards the end of the book the Author talks briefly about his brief career after the end of the war, particularly about his relatively brief time in china, I found this part of the book a little maudlin and overly poetic. For me it detracted from a book that up to this point I had enjoyed very much. I was interested in what happened to the author after his experience in the war, but felt that he should either have finished the book at the end of the war, or to more fully describe his later career. I would, However, not want this to put anyone of this otherwise excellent book, the last part is relatively brief and after all, this is just one persons subjective view.
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Sagittarius Rising
Sagittarius Rising by Cecil Lewis (Paperback - 18 Jun 2009)
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