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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Needs better examples
as one of the US reviewers has pointed out the actual model of asking questions/ observing behavior is quite simple, but really requires some simple diagrams to summarize the points and the procedure.

What is lacking in the book is a full transcription of using the technique from start to finish, with the questions etc.

What you do get are the...
Published on 11 Aug 2012 by Mr. P. G. Chesters

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spy the Lie
An interesting read, made more enjoyable by the real life situations that they refer back to using their lie detecting process. It certainly offers food for thought.

Smcgill
Published 16 months ago by Stephen McGill


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Needs better examples, 11 Aug 2012
By 
Mr. P. G. Chesters (London) - See all my reviews
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as one of the US reviewers has pointed out the actual model of asking questions/ observing behavior is quite simple, but really requires some simple diagrams to summarize the points and the procedure.

What is lacking in the book is a full transcription of using the technique from start to finish, with the questions etc.

What you do get are the transcripts of three US TV interviews, one the US Congressman defending himself against the accusation he sent lewd photos to a girls twitter account, one the Penn state coach accused of sexually abusing children and the third an interview by Piers Morgan of a Tea party book author. They used the methodology to show you that these people were lying, but as another US Amazon reviewer said with the first two you could have told that yourself without reading the book.
In the third case Piers seem to ask questions on an obscure part of the book rather than the point that the author wanted to discuss so doesn't seem an example of determining whether someone is ling or not. Would have been a bit more interesting if thee authors of the book had used the techniques to see if Piers is lying about phone hacking.

The fourth case is an examination of the first interview the Police did with OJ Simpson and how they failed to use the techniques in the model.

However, as I say the one thing that is missing is an example of actually using the model in full. They suggest from their examples that if you use it, as it is non confrontational, people in effect will end up to fessing up in job interviews, security clearances etc to quite incredible things.

There's a list of questions at the end about hiring a child caregiver, infidelity, children taking drugs and theft and I feel a a disguised example suing one of these would have been beneficial.

They are not too keen on Lie to Me micro expression either.

All in all probably useful if you do job interviews and the like but you will need to spend some time mapping the complete model out from the info in the book.

If you need it to find out if your partner is being unfaithful I would suggest the game is already over.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So simple, so powerful, 11 Oct 2012
By 
Graham Sutherland (Chester, Cheshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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As a manager of many years I have heard so many lies told by so many people. I wanted this book to confirm to me that the criteria I use to identify lies was correct. It did that and then it gave me so much more that I can use each and every day. Simply and clearly written it is an invaluable tool for all managers of people and for anyone who wants to understand more about behaviour.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spy the Lie, 28 April 2013
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An interesting read, made more enjoyable by the real life situations that they refer back to using their lie detecting process. It certainly offers food for thought.

Smcgill
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some good stuff, but ludicrous anecdotes, 18 April 2013
By 
Mr. C. Morris "Watchman" (London) - See all my reviews
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A highly enjoyable read, but hokey at times.

Most of the early anecdotes explaining how a 'suspect' confesses all suddenly seem ludicrous. We have the 'foreign asset' Omar, who everyone thinks is a straight guy, but the interviewer finds out otherwise. It's as though we have to applaud him for not going along with everyone else's view, but frankly, any guy who asks to pray when casually asked if he's been working for the other side, well, it's a bit suspect isn't it? And then goes on to exhibit real shiftiness and nervousness.

Same with the Caribbean maid suspected off nicking money from a wallet. She just suddenly confesses all. Never mind the slightly possibly racist assertion that Caribbeans wouldn't confess, as it goes against their psyche (the book starts off talking about 9/11 and does seem to proceed with that paranoid world view), nobody just immediately owns up to nicking money do they, whatever your culture! In this case she does, but as with Omar, the inquisitor is in the driving seat and the 'victim' is probably keenly aware of her vulnerable position. And you can imagine the American woman being a bit like Joel's mum in Risky Business.

In fact the one time this doesn't happen is in the fascinating chapter on the OJ Simpson interview. And of course, he's a famous, rich guy and his inquisitors, normal cops, will be the ones in awe. All the same, this is the best chapter in the book.

There is some good stuff in this, such as avoiding a sharp, adversarial inquisitive question that only serve to put the other person on their guard. An open-ended question will make them sweat more, as they wonder how much you actually know - that's if they are dishonest. But it does help if you are in a superior position from the off.

Alternatively, referral statements where someone pledges their good reputation, a sign that they may be guilty - well, I could see myself doing that if I was feeling victimised and the questioner didn't know me. Or getting angry and going on the attack, if I felt that the line of questioning was unfair, or the quizzers were getting up my nose. Wouldn't make me the guilty one necessarily.

Otherwise, this reminds me of those How to Pick Up Girls manuals, where a friendly question about her shoes might lead to her on her knees in a nearby hotel room giving you head 30 minutes later! Not saying that couldn't happen, but there'll be other factors at play here. Like, is this her normal modus operandi, are you both good looking, is she in the middle of a drought, so on. But we're all meant to marvel at the results. Like, the guy in an FBI interview who folds when they ask, Is there anything else we ought to know? And he starts banging on about his hithero unknown foot fetish, and how he dopes his wife so he can indulge in it without her knowledge or permission. Just like that!

Some of these examples do you make you wonder if you're not the one being had here!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 26 April 2014
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This review is from: Spy the Lie: Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception (Paperback)
Came as expected. Very interesting book. Everyone should read it. Book was in good condition. A good read and educational
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting evidence based analysis, 4 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Spy the Lie: Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception (Paperback)
The thesis that lies are signalled by recognisable patterns of behaviour is certainly interesting; even more useful is the advice on when to ignore random signals.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 9 Sep 2013
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A book that dispels some of the urban myths whilst at the same time explains what you should really be looking for. There is also some interesting anecdotes. I liked the conversational style and simple language
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5.0 out of 5 stars A unique work on the subject, 12 Aug 2013
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If you've ever been involved in interviewing or vetting this is the works you sorely missed. But it is a textbook so if novels etc are your thing moveon
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Book, 30 July 2013
By 
Phil (MANASSAS, VIRGINIA, US) - See all my reviews
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It's an awesome and insightful book on detecting lies. No one will take you for granted anymore. It's worth its value.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great book, 24 July 2013
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great book so glad I bought this , its a big insight to the real world , well worth trying it
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Spy the Lie: Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception
Spy the Lie: Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception by Susan Carnicero (Paperback - 18 July 2013)
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