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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Read
Fantastic read. Would highly recommend to anybody with a slight interest in sport or business and the thinking that goes into it! very clever stuff!!
Published 17 days ago by miguel

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read, but tarnished by events since publication
This is an entertaining book and the author has gone to some effort to spend time in plenty of the global centres that produce world class talent, what he calls his 'gold mines': the Kenyan marathon runners, Ethiopian distance runners, Russian female tennis players, Brazilian soccer players, South Korean golfers and Jamaican sprinters. The premise in a nutshell is that...
Published 2 months ago by Chris


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read, but tarnished by events since publication, 26 April 2014
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This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
This is an entertaining book and the author has gone to some effort to spend time in plenty of the global centres that produce world class talent, what he calls his 'gold mines': the Kenyan marathon runners, Ethiopian distance runners, Russian female tennis players, Brazilian soccer players, South Korean golfers and Jamaican sprinters. The premise in a nutshell is that hard work beats any kind of 'natural talent' every time. On the positive side, it throws up some interesting characters and, for anybody involved in talent development and coaching there are some real nuggets of advice in there from some very successful coaches in the gold mines.

HOWEVER, a couple of things bother me about this book. Firstly, the lazy proof-reading; you'll go through chapters where there it a typo nearly every other page, it gives you the feeling that you're reading the homework of a 15 year old kid. Secondly, some of the gold mines get much more air time than others - there is very little about Brazilian footballers apart from a few anecdotal experiences from Ankerson. But lastly, the gold mine that gets the most focus is the Jamaican sprinters who Ankersen fawns over, describing the incredible project in Kingston that has trained complete nobodies into some of the world's most incredible sprinters. Mentioned in the book specifically are:
- Asafa Powell who came from unknown sprinter to set a new world record in 2005 of 9.77 seconds for the 100m.
- Sherone Simpson, relative unknown to the athletics world who 'worked' her way to bronze in the Beijing 2008 Olympics women's 100m.
Actually both of these tested positive for banned substances in 2013, which certainly detracts from the argument that something special is going on at their particular training camp (as long as you don't consider doping 'special'). You might think of this as minor but the development of Asafa Powell in particular is majored on and, for me, it taints the Jamaican sprinters as a gold mine. Usain Bolt doesn't get anywhere near as many mentions as he was always fast - slightly upsetting the argument that, in this discipline anyway, natural talent counts for an awful lot.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Trite, 7 Feb 2014
This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
I was hoping for a critical analysis of high performance. Instead, this is a trite, self-help book of anecdotes. For example, what conclusions can a population derive from one anecdote regarding the placebo effect from 1957?

The take-home message of this book could be summarised in a small leaflet, and it's conclusions are in opposition to the success enjoyed by the team GB cycling team. The 'secret of high performance' as it applied to me was, 'you should have started 45 years ago'. Not helpful.

I thought this a waste of time and money.

If you want some genuine insight into some aspects of sports performance, read 'The Sports Gene..' which covers the genetic aspects of sporting excellence in detail and is very good. This book pretty much dismisses genetics altogether.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Read, 23 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
Fantastic read. Would highly recommend to anybody with a slight interest in sport or business and the thinking that goes into it! very clever stuff!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Valuable insight into the myths surrounding success, 4 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
A great read with interesting stories and relevant facts. The author has gone to great lengths to investigate the reasons behind the success of elite sportsmen and women, and how this same thinking can be applied to improve performance in any walk of life.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 12 Feb 2014
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Excellent book on what separates elite performers from everyone else. Essential reading if your involved in coaching,especially young performers but still great with adults
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5.0 out of 5 stars possibly the most important book you'll ever read!, 3 Feb 2014
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For anyone involved in coaching or leadership, this book could be one of the most important you'll ever read. It challenges many preconceptions about "talent" and how to spot it and examines the importance of "grit". Western society has convinced itself it needs the swankiest, high tech facilities to nurture its talent - this book just might change your mind!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, 11 Jan 2014
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Great read if you are interested in talent id and development or are interested in any form of coaching, training or physical education!
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3.0 out of 5 stars one of those books, 9 Dec 2013
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This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
inspiring to some extent but doesn't necessarily apply to everyone. It's a good motivational book and probably help at times but don't make this book your bible!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 10 Oct 2013
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A. Reader (London, England) - See all my reviews
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I was a bit dubious about getting this, but it more than exceeded my expectations.
The author has not only come up with a convincing hypothesis as to what makes the difference between champions and the rest, but he backs it up with solid research, having sold what he had to raise the money to visit centres of excellence around the world. What I like especially is the way he thinks and the conclusions he comes to. Anyone wondering why England doesn't produce many tennis champions or world-class footballers these days will find the answers here.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Feedback, 1 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. At times i thought this could have been said in shorter version.

However, I was intellectually stimulated by the comparisons and his take on what is talent, the 10 000 hour rule and the role of parental push to get over a certain threshold before the athlete really enjoys making the effort required to walk in the company of the best.

As a sport psychology consultant, i am amazed at how elite coaches fluff with words when i ask them what they are looking for in an athlete or what is the talent they require as coach to be confident that their investment will produce desired results. This book reinforced an unsaid opinion. Talent is a construct - a word created to help us say what we cant see and measure. By contrast, for example, the 10 000 hour rule suggests that effort and who wants it more is a more useful and tangible predictor/measure of sporting success.

Lastly, I do not like the rating of "I love it" for material things.
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The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance
The Gold Mine Effect: Crack the Secrets of High Performance by Rasmus Ankersen (Paperback - 5 July 2012)
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