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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Diverse phenomena of air travel explained simply
Aimed very much at non-scientists, Clegg provides entertaining and moderately informative explanations to a number of diverse aspects of air travel. He guides us from the technology of airport security systems and the science of flight to the formation of topographic features seen from above and the weather systems that we might encounter.

Clegg's...
Published on 25 Aug. 2011 by ceriithomas

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review of Inflight Scinece
I found the information quite clear and easy to read. There is nothing fundamental about the science involved although basic physics is visited. Einstein gets a mention several times but I found the book to be more suitable to someone perhaps of eight to twelve years old. In that respect I was a little disappointed by the content. I did not know what I was buying when...
Published on 13 Jun. 2011 by MJ


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Diverse phenomena of air travel explained simply, 25 Aug. 2011
Aimed very much at non-scientists, Clegg provides entertaining and moderately informative explanations to a number of diverse aspects of air travel. He guides us from the technology of airport security systems and the science of flight to the formation of topographic features seen from above and the weather systems that we might encounter.

Clegg's conversational style generally works well, and succeeds in explaining complex phenomena relatively free of jargon. But I felt that a few more diagrams might have added to the text.

Some of the features appear to have been selected on rather a random basis (the chances of spotting crop circles or Nazca lines from the air are in reality pretty slim), which lends the book a rather quirky character. This might not teach you all the science that you had forgotten since school, but it's a step in that direction.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review of Inflight Scinece, 13 Jun. 2011
I found the information quite clear and easy to read. There is nothing fundamental about the science involved although basic physics is visited. Einstein gets a mention several times but I found the book to be more suitable to someone perhaps of eight to twelve years old. In that respect I was a little disappointed by the content. I did not know what I was buying when I ordered the book so I make no complain in that respect. However, next time I might try and read someone else's review before purchasing a book from Amazon.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating aerial facts an' thoughts, 11 Jun. 2011
Having got the book for my best friend who's flown planes, helicopters, ME109's and probably Sopwith's in his time, this wanna be "Brian Trubshaw", knew it all and almost did! Until he picked up this book. His monologues have lengthened somewhat, but at least it's stuff wot I have never heard before and it really IS interesting!! A great book and I should know, I can repeat every line!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This light but informative read is fun and accessible, 30 April 2012
Brian Clegg lets you in some of the science you experience as you travel by air to your sunny destination, from airport scanners and security checks, to how your plane actually gets into the air. And he doesn't stop there - he tackles some of the things you might see out of the window: the Uffington White Horse; crop circles or simply just the tides. He even explains how an airplane toilet works and why you could never get sucked into the vacuum flush!

This light but informative read is fun and accessible and the perfect book to read on your travels - and there are even a few inflight experiments for you to get your teeth into. It'll leave you marvelling at the science and engineering that goes into flying - something we all take for granted when we're jetting off.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A reasonable inflight distraction - but nothing better than that, 7 July 2012
By 
Dr. Simon Howard "sjhoward" (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Inflight Science gives a brief tour of some major science concepts set loosely around the fact that you're supposed to read it on a plane. There are miniature "experiments" to carry out whilst airborne (e.g. throwing a ball of paper in the air and noting that it doesn't fly to the back of the plane).

There's nothing especially wrong with this concept. It's nature means that the explanations are brief, and the science discussed doesn't go much above school-level. Some of the links to being inflight are tenuous at best: syphons are explained because toilets on planes don't use them, for example.

My main complaints about this book are that it's a touch simple, and a touch bland. There isn't all that much about the science of flight, which is disappointing.

All-in-all, it's a so-so book that whizzes through a few probably familiar scientific concepts. It might get you through a short flight, but you won't remember much of it once you land, and there are much better things you could be reading.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Actually, science is fun!, 27 April 2011
By 
Gordon B (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
I'm found science boring at school. It was always more fun looking out of the classroom window than listening to anything the science teacher was saying.

Then, along comes a book that asks you to look out of your airplane window for a science lesson. It seemed like I was going back to my schooldays, looking out of the window again. It's science Jim, but not as we know it! The author makes science interesting, describing things in a way that makes it seem easy to understand. Basic things I never really understood before are explained clearly for a non-scientist to understand.

This book is really riveting. I could hardly put it down once I started it. Anyone who has taken a flight can relate to it. It was an enjoyable read and I learnt a lot from it too. Thoroughly recommended.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite what the reviews suggested, 26 Jun. 2011
I have to confess to being slightly disappointed by this book...

The reviews I'd read in the press made it seem that the book was a real insight into the science around civil aviation. While some of that is covered, there is quite a bit of science to do with things that are only really tangentially connected to the central topic. For example, there is a section on the formation of oxbow forms in rivers, included because a passenger can see river formations out of the window while taking off. It's not uninteresting, but there are plenty of science issues connected with flight that aren't covered, and I felt their absence. For example, there wasn't anything about the science of the tracking of airline fleets, nothing about the scientific/ economic decisions relating to the optimal size of passenger planes, no insight into how planes are constructed (materials etc.).

Instead, the book is a discussion of a disparate collection of scientific issues loosely connected by tying them into the sequence of a flight. As I said, not uninteresting if what you're looking for is a novel science primer.

By the way, if someone reading this review knows a good book that covers more aspects of the technology of civil aviation, please let me know!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A rather forgettable treatise of flight and its associations., 10 Oct. 2014
By 
Clive Turner (Paphos, Cyprus.) - See all my reviews
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In places, this is a somewhat overly technical explanation of flight and its associations. Much of it is of little interest if an accurate expose of the science. I tried to assess if I had learned much, and the outcome was yes, I had, but not a great deal of it has stuck because it is rather trivial and you realise a lot of it is basically commonsense and that you already knew a fair amount of the book's content anyway.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An entertaining, scientific read. Depending on your science knowledge, this could be the book for you., 19 Aug. 2011
By 
Lloyd Morgan (Haarlem and Amsterdam, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
From your arrival at the departure airport, via the security checkpoints and your plane's departure, through to landing in your destination -- Brian Clegg runs you through all the popular science related to a typical flight.

While the 'hard science' is somewhat lacking, this is still a worthwhile book that you can't fail to learn one or two things from.

Written in an informal and educational manner, Inflight Science feels more like an extended secondary school science lesson than a serious discourse in 'the science of flying'.

That said, if you're looking for an easy read, or if you're new to popular science books, then this is a good choice for a long flight: it'll open your eyes and keep you entertained.

If you're already well-read in matter of science, this is probably one to miss.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inflight Insight, 30 Jan. 2012
By 
Ian Miles (Oxfordshire, GB) - See all my reviews
Bought this as a potential 'stocking-filler' for a slightly nerdy nephew and have ended up keeping it as a refresher / handy reference work for my tutoring support jobs. A manageable but surprisingly comprehensive and cross-curricular review of the 'workings of the world' for lay people (ie non-techies) & with an unusual approach which may suit certain mid-teenagers bored/boggled with conventional school science & geography. The style is interesting & authoritative without being patronising or over-dense, and the practical experiment & observation suggestions are good too.
One of a range of 'nice little niche books' for the shelves of anyone curious about our planet & ourselves. Perhaps better buy 2 copies ~ as if you put one of them amongst your 'guest loo literature', you're quite likely to find it has quietly walked!
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Inflight Science: A Guide to the World from Your Airplane Window
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