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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 31 July 2012
I am by no means an economist. It was this fact that drove me towards this book as a means of (hopefully) gaining some insight into the financial mess the world now finds itself.
To be honest, I did find some of the early sections that dealt with more the more mathematical side of economics a little heavy-going for my non numerical brain. It really picked up for me later on when talking about the whole neo-classical economics and it's apparent wealth of shortcomings.
I always suspected there was something wrong with a world based on constant growth and the accumulation of wealth as the be-all and end-all of life. Now Economyths has given me an answer -and someone to blame.
Although the arguements are compelling to my layman's brain, I'm sure the author has an agenda of his own. That's OK though- it's also something that makes total sense to me.
Let's just hope somebody listens and people start to act before it all becomes too late.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 31 May 2012
It's clear, it's easy to read and it makes sense. It questions traditional economics, and while it's not a lone voice these days it won't find favour with the rich and powerful. Chapter 8 is particularly good, questioning growth and emphasising that we have only one earth, only one store of resources, far too much waste and a growing population. Don't just read it and enjoy it. Read it and take action!
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69 of 78 people found the following review helpful
on 20 February 2011
After any great political or sociological phenomenon, the publishing industry's response tends to follow three distinct phases. Firstly, there are knee-jerk accounts of what happened by people who frankly don't have a clue. In the case of the credit crunch the worst include cash-in City memoires by assorted junior traders, and opportunistic accounts by novelists, political science academics and others who barely know their RAVs from their elbows. The second wave includes more considered accounts by more knowledgeable types. These typically take longer to get out because their authors are waiting for the dust to settle/have proper jobs. Here you tend to get books by senior City figures, intelligent financial journalists and so on. These, however, are still focused on describing and explaining what has just occurred, and perhaps offering suggestions for regulatory changes to make them less likely to occur again. Philip Augur's `Reckless' is a good example of this type. Finally, you get the books that put the events into their wider context and suggest some more radical solutions. These can be very variable indeed, ranging from the frankly nutty to the brilliant. `Economyths' is brilliant.

As it happens, I wasn't expecting a great deal from the book. David Orrell isn't an economist, he's an applied mathematician, and he hasn't, so far as I can tell, worked in the City. Books by outsiders, however talented, frequently miss the point, often because they are pushing a political agenda, or perhaps because they just `don't get it'. But I was pleasantly surprised from the first chapter, and by the end I was absolutely converted to his viewpoint. Indeed, is should carry a health warning - read this book and you will never be able to take the claims of classical economics seriously again.

In each of his ten chapters Orrell takes aim at one of the founding assumptions of neo-classical economics, like `Homo economicus' and the efficient markets hypothesis, and knocks them down one by one. Typically he starts by undermining their foundations by showing their questionable origins (usually in dodgy analogies to 19th Century physics). Then he meticulously demonstrates how they distort, fail to represent or contradict the economic data. By the end, you wonder how you ever took them seriously at all.

Easily my favourite chapter was his demolition of the `law' of supply and demand. This is perhaps the one thing that everyone thinks they know and agrees with about economics. Yet, if it was true, markets would always (at least in the absence of catastrophic shocks to supply or demand) self-regulate towards a mean. The mean itself would change only slowly (e.g. with changes in agricultural practice, general wealth or population) and bubbles would be effectively impossible. In fact, bubbles in all sorts of areas are relatively common. Orrell demonstrates convincingly that in certain circumstances market moves operate as `negative feedback' and the `law' holds, in others they operate as `positive feedback' and it doesn't. It's an obvious point, and it's been made before, but rarely has it been made so fluently or convincingly. It turns out that the Gausian bell curve does not represent the typical shape of market movements - at least not stock markets with their heavily speculative character - but instead they observe the fractal `power relationships' visible in, for example, the ratio of earthquake magnitude to frequency. If you're like me you'll be slapping your forehead.

Markets, it seems, are more like chaotic organic systems than the well-regulated physical `machines' that the neo-classical economists would have us believe. And this is where the book ascends above similar attacks on the status quo, into the realms of genius. Too many critiques of the neo-classical, liberal consensus point out plausibly what is wrong and then point vaguely in the direction of a `something' that must be done. For example, we didn't need David Orrell to tell us that `homo economicus' was a myth, and a silly one at that. Anyone who's read the work of Kahneman and Tversky knows that. But that lack of a plausible alternative theoretical framework allows the neo-classical economists to throw them off. We've seen a lot of work recently aimed at tweaking the models to deal with things like asymmetrical information or imperfect rationality.

Orrell recognises that we need a Copernican revolution to sweep away these Ptolemaic epicycles and the discredited theory they are shoring up. Fortunately, with his mathematical background he recognises that maths and physics haven't stood still, and that changes in the fields of network theory, for example, hold the key to a looser but more accurate model - or more likely set of models - that would more correctly describe the behaviour of economies. This doesn't set out a new framework - that would take a long and complex book - but it plausibly shows where one is to be found, and hopefully a new generation of economists will be inspired to fill in the gaps.

This is a book that should be read by everyone. It deserves to be a best seller. I suspect it won't be, though, and the responsibility lies with the publishers. This is a serious, exciting, invigoration and beautifully written destruction of the economic status quo. So, what do they do? Package it in a garish mustard yellow cover with a stupid, cartoonish design so that it looks like it's aimed at children. Even the subtitle ("Ten Ways That Economics Gets it Wrong") doesn't do justice to the scope and importance of this book. So, come on Icon, re-release this with a properly-designed, smart cover, and get it on the `three for two' tables. Your author deserves it. We deserve it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 June 2012
Very informative and readable account of why things went wrong in 2008. A necessary account of an area of the news which is repeated frequently but rarely explained to the layman such as myself. It's not flawless but manages to entertain and asks the reader to pursue some of the loose ends.

Keep this book in mind when you watch similar accounts from the neo-classical economic view!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 9 November 2013
It would be hard to imagine a book on economics written by a non-linear mathematician stirring the interest of many. I have personally found economics and books on the subject to be very dry and impersonal. But Economyths proved to be addictive reading, in part because the author was free from the shackles of a formal education in economics. Such an education continues to teach an idealised economics view of the world where the environment is an endless supply of resources and humans always act rationally.

Actually, the point repeatedly raised by Orrell is that classical economics presumes humans to be super-rational, making decisions based solely on monetary matters all the time. He rips apart the 'scientific' foundations of economics for what they are - inappropriately basing mass human behaviour on Newtonian mechanical principles.

This will delight those with an anti-establishment view - those uncomfortable with the profit and growth mantras. But for those steeped in the traditional or neo-classical viewpoints, this will be excruciating reading that would likely dismiss in order to quash feelings of cognitive dissonance.

Fabulous book, and a massive challenge to Universities the world over.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 September 2013
The book explains the relatively new science of economics as not a science in reality but as unpredictable as monkeys making bets in the money markets. The author does a fine job of explaining both ends of the economic approach with the markets clearly favouring the free-market approach as opposed to the other more controlled version. I mean who wouldn't? If I was a player in the money markets I would have loved to trade without any checks and balances. This book is written to change the perception of a serious marketplace but I suspect will not make a huge difference as money is money after all.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 20 November 2012
Do the proponents of laissez-faire capitalism really believe the guff they spout, about the self-correcting nature and fundamental rightness of the market, the desirability and sustainability of continuous growth, etc? Or are they all, like Bernie Madoff, knowingly colluding in a massive Ponzi scheme, safe in the knowledge that they won't be the suckers on the bottom floor taking the hit? Either way, this very readable book demolishes the bizarre and wrong-headed assumptions of neoclassical economics in an entertaining style, and offers what sound to be reasonable alternatives, based on rational, scientific principles rather than ideology. It reminded me of Nassim Taleb's 'The Black Swan', only without the egotism and self-satisfied posturing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 22 November 2013
An excellent critique by a properly qualified analyst that exposes the amazing over-simplification of those who claimed they understood our economy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 22 October 2013
I found this much more interesting than I expected and it explains in simple language the theories behind economic policies which I understood properly for the first time.
I'm not sure that I agree with all he says, but it was certainly food for thought and enables me to understand more of what the government, banks etc are talking about.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 September 2013
Well written and not only highlights the significant problems with our current economic models, but offers potential solutions too. Sadly I fear the people who are most influential will ignore it as it would cost them the most.
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