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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An American layperson learns, and likes it --
I disagree that "this is only for the clergy". I am an expatriate Texan of the Anglican Use / Ordinariate, now living in England. I recently got the Customary, and am still getting acquainted with it. Yes, it takes a while to learn "where to go next"; but no more so than first trying to use the Liturgy of the Hours or the Book of Divine Worship, both of which I have...
Published 20 months ago by Mrs. R. H. A. Wenner

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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Inadequate psalter translation, ment for reciting private, not singing in public.
I give it only two stars because firstly, the translations of the psalms do not correctly match either the latin gallican psalter or greek septuagint psalter. For anglicans who enter into the Russian Orthodox Church, It was seen to be of great necessity to the correct words of the Coverdale psalter, where it was mistaken, and keep the them the same where translated...
Published 9 months ago by Philip Mcavoy


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An American layperson learns, and likes it --, 2 Dec 2012
By 
Mrs. R. H. A. Wenner "Aunt Raven" (Cheshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
I disagree that "this is only for the clergy". I am an expatriate Texan of the Anglican Use / Ordinariate, now living in England. I recently got the Customary, and am still getting acquainted with it. Yes, it takes a while to learn "where to go next"; but no more so than first trying to use the Liturgy of the Hours or the Book of Divine Worship, both of which I have used. (Everything when new seems to be difficult; when you get accustomed, it seems logical and easy).

The Customary is beautiful and deepens interior life even though one still fumbles. It is helpful to put a hand-written "flow chart" along with other bookmarks in it; I "cheat" by using little movable colored file tabs on the different pages with numbers written on them to facilitate flipping to the next section.

One criticism is that I need reading-glasses for the print, and the book doesn't quite have enough ribbons; so I put some of my own in. Be inventive; the book is an adventure, so make it your own with whatever helps you navigate in the beginning. It is a glorious book, especially the modern readings, many by Newman. It has considered, kept the best, and improved many of the shortcomings of its American predecessor, the BDW; but suitable for the historical and cultural sensibilites of the UK, which is as it should be.

That's not to say it's perfect -- but it is brilliantly edited and rewards the time spent in getting familiar with it. Hang in there, you will become unexpectedly fond of it sooner than you think. I do recommend making a water-proof cover for it for use outdoors.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Anglican patrimony, 13 Jan 2013
This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
The Customary is very similar to the American 1928 BCP, with the addition of collects for feasts that do not occur in the Anglican calendar, and of collects and short readings to make up the three day offices of Terce, Sext and None. sundays and feasts are provided with a long reading from the anglican patrimony: mediaeval writers, noted converts and anglo-catholics who remained in communion with the see of Canterbury. These readings seem well chosen give a good flavour of the contribution of the British Islands to the Catholic faith.

According to the rubrics, morning and evening prayer (matins and evensong) together constitute a complete office. With two longish readings they each take about thirty minutes to say. Compline and the day hours are provided if required. Compline is very similar to the 1928 BCP, with the ingenious addition of seasonal antiphons for the nunc dimittis (for which alternative canticles are provided at evening prayer if compline is to be said). Final anthems to Our Lady are also provided (in full rather than the truncated ones in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours).

The rubrics allow four readings from holy scripture as given in the lectionary, or one of the non biblical readings provided may be substituted on Sundays and Holy Days. Alternatively, the readings from the Office of Readings in the LotH may be used at either morning or evening prayer. Curiously, there is no mention of substituting the lections from the mass of the day, which would seem to make sense unless one is attending mass that day. The drawback is that to say the office one needs the customary plus either a bible or breviary (or missal).

Anyone used to praying the traditional Anglican office is unlikely to have difficulty with the Customary. It is slightly more complex than the BCP but easier than any version of the Roman breviary, largely due to the absence of antiphons for the psalms and canticles (though a welcome exception has been made for the great O antiphons). The psalms are read sequentially (except on Sundays when they are proper) and none is omitted, though, for the squeamish, 58 is optional (but, oddly, not 109). The Coverdale translation is used, with the familiar BCP canticles and collects, and we are permitted to say "Holy Ghost" and the traditional Lord's Prayer ("which art" rather than "who art" &c), for which much thanks.

Why do we need yet another daily office? The Customary allows members of the Ordinariates to pray the office from a volume with an imprimatur and therefore to pray with the Church. It uses translations from the Prayer Book with which many Anglicans are familiar and which are miles better than any modern alternatives, in an office that conforms to the modern Roman calendar. Other Catholic layfolk who are not bound to recite the office but who wish to do so in dignified heiratic English may also appreciate this book. Production values seem high - as they should for this price - and the non-leather binding looks durable.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recalling our youth, 29 Nov 2012
By 
Mrs. Jean Bates "Phoebe" (Hampshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
Excellent work - using the liturgy and terminology that we all remember and love from many years ago - thank you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham, 8 April 2014
By 
stephen Walsh (BRADFORD, West Yorkshire, GB) - See all my reviews
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This is daily prayer recommended for those Anglicans who, whilst remembering their history and liturgy ,become Catholic.
The book is as beautiful as the prayers it contains.
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5.0 out of 5 stars perfect, 7 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
For an Anglican joining the Ordinariate it is a Feast of familiar texts and cadences of sublime beauty, you will not be disappointed
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 11 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
I purchased this book for reference; as a member of the Ordinariate in Canada with some experience with liturgy, I was as much curious as anything. It is a very good example of a book of its type, reasonably well laid-out with generally clear rubrics. I would rather have seen all additional propers for a given day together, as there is still a fair amount of "random" page-flipping, and three ribbons might be rather strained on some days.

My criticisms are fairly straightforward and have more to do with structure than content: (1) I find the font difficult to read in large blocks, which does force concentration on the text but also makes eyestrain an issue; (2) the entire pages of red rubrics introducing the lectionary are simply brutal; and (3) the lectionary itself is a little too abbreviated - it can be difficult to follow for a newcomer. None of these issues is more than a minor annoyance, however.

Tim Smith
Calgary AB
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3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not for the Layman, 23 Nov 2012
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
This Customary seems to be designed for Anglican Use Clergy only. The book requires other books to support its main purpose of Orderly Liturgical Prayer. I shared the book with my Pastor and even he had difficulty and said he could not show me how to use it properly.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Inadequate psalter translation, ment for reciting private, not singing in public., 16 Oct 2013
By 
Philip Mcavoy (Emmitsburg, MD) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham (Hardcover)
I give it only two stars because firstly, the translations of the psalms do not correctly match either the latin gallican psalter or greek septuagint psalter. For anglicans who enter into the Russian Orthodox Church, It was seen to be of great necessity to the correct words of the Coverdale psalter, where it was mistaken, and keep the them the same where translated correctly. The original coverdale of the 16th century did not match the original latin, greek and hebrew it was not done with the care and scholarship that for instance went into the Douay Rheims or King James, which are both better translations. The resulting corrected Coverdale psalter published by the Russians is titled "A Psalter for Prayer" by David James, it remains a Coverdale translation, but with serious corrections. There is no need to have bias against the translation because it was made by the Orthodox Church, it is the best translation to use for Anglo-Catholics and ought to be embraced by all Catholics seeking to use english liturgy. It is distinctly different from the Douay Rheims, which though an excellent translation is less singeable and was not designed for singing.

Secondly, as others noted, this is a breviary which tends to encourage the office as a private devotion, it is not a "noted" (with musical notes) breviary or portiforium. It tends not to include antiphons, responsories or hymns. Yet that is exactly what the historic divine office of all christendom contained. The only churches to reject antiphons are those which are protestant, done specifically as a rejection of catholic and orthodox values. What the ordinariates should have done, and still can do in the future - is base their office on "The Order of Vespers throughout the year from the Salisbury use" (1934/1968) and "The Diurnal Noted from the Salisbury Use (1926)" by G.H. Palmer. They could also base it off of Dr. William Renwick's english versions of the Sarum use office at the Gregorian Institute of Canada. (People often commission Dr. Renwick and his associates for typesetting work, they could produce a better breviary designed for the ordinariates upon request.)

If one wants a private prayer book that complements a 30 minute "low mass mentality", than this is a fine book which fulfills all their legal obligations. If one wants to truly live with the spirit of the apostles and the spirit of the law, the spirit of "renewal" celebrating the Divine Office as it truly must be - as an act of public sung prayer, they must search elsewhere. G.H. Palmers' and C.W. Douglas' books remain for the time being the only viable options for singing the office in the english tradition from a single book, with propers for all seasons and saints.

Yet I also know that many will find it to be a good book. Through the lens contemporary preconconceptions that may be so, but I assure all, if you took a man from the 15th century england, put them in a time machine to the 21st century, and gave them this book to replace their old book of hours from the 15th century, they would be very disappointed. This is the lens of conception that brings me to give the book this rating.

I do genuinely appreciate the work that went into the book, it is adequate as a temporary solution, but nothing more.
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Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham
Customary of Our Lady of Walsingham by Andrew Burnham and Aidan Nichols (Hardcover - 31 Aug 2012)
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