Customer Reviews


38 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Looking for the "buy button" inside our heads
On one level this is about advertising and persuasion through neuromarketing. World class branding guru Martin Lindstrom commissioned a couple of top researchers, Dr. Gemma Calvert using fMRI technology, and Professor Richard Silberstein using SST technology, to look inside the heads of consumers to see why we buy what we buy. Lindstrom, who makes a living advising...
Published on 27 Oct. 2008 by Dennis Littrell

versus
59 of 59 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not much new; yet very conceited
buyology presents a few interesting insights, but mostly the narrative is marred by the authors irrelevant and boastful ego trip. Also - I find the book lacking in nuance. E.g. Lindstrom often reports that X has an effect on Y - but not how big an effect, and alternative explanations are not given much thought nor space.

Mostly the book fails because it does...
Published on 4 Jan. 2009 by A. Christoffersen


Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Read the five-star reviews skeptically, 14 Jan. 2011
The book starts with a foreward featuring the unusually critical "Like a Pre-Raphaelite painting there is a glow that emanates from Martin as if he was destined to be on stage. No, not as a matinee idol, but as some god waif. The man exudes virtue." Steady on! Isn't there anything positive you can say about the guy? (/irony)

Fortunately, Martin Lindstrom is happy to redress the balance and tell us all about what a titan of a man he is. At great length. There are *some* pages in "Buyology" that don't feature the words "I" or "me", but don't worry; there aren't many.

The best thing I can say about this book is that it occasionally provokes a resigned shrug. It tells you stuff you've most likely already read about somewhere else or thought to yourself. It would possibly have made a good "Time" magazine feature spread and probably has about ten magazine pages-worth of content. Including photos and art design, of course. But "an absolutely magnificent guided tour in my brain"? No. If you are sincerely looking for a book that can tell you the way the mind works, I can't think of anything better than Robert B. Cialdini's "Influence".

*Another* note to Amazon (previous reviewers have said the same thing): wouldn't it be possible to devise a way of weeding out fake five-star scores by people who have only ever given a single, one-sentence "a new way for times to come"-style review? You can see why the author's publishers/marketing team indulge in astroturfing, but why do you tolerate it? You were quick to delete the one-star reviews complaining about the price of ebooks as compared to printed copies - and you were absolutely right to do so. Not doing the same for the fake five-star reviews shows a lack of moral consistency. How about only allowing reviews to go online once a reviewer has submitted, say, three reviews of different products? It would make astroturfing more difficult and give consumers a more accurate picture of what they are thinking of buying. And you'd be getting slightly higher up towards the moral high ground.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A mind-blowing brain-opener!, 12 Nov. 2008
By 
Morten Richardt (Denmark) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Martin Lindstrom seems to have invaded my radar! The first encounter was at a Copenhagen Business School at a Master semester course build on Lindstrom's earlier books Brand Child and Brand Sense. What especially intrigued me in these books was the insight of branding towards all senses including smell and sound.

In Martin Lindstrom's new book "Buyology: Truth and Lies about Why We Buy", the endeavor continues as one are taken on a mind-blowing journey into the cutting edge research of neuromarketing (combining marketing, medical knowledge and technology), that reveals astonishing insights into the world of marketing and how our brains respond, why we buy certain brands and discard others.

It should be stated, that the book is written in an easy to read, fun and exiting way that makes it hard to do anything else than turn pages and get wiser, while being kept entertained! This is certainly admirable, the subject of neuromarketing taken into consideration! The myriad of examples on real life marketing cases presented in each chapter adds to the understanding.

The scientific study of consumers brains are conducted using two different technologies, respectively fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), which is a big scanner, which measures the level of oxygenated blood in the brain. If a certain part of the brain is activated (e.g. when showed a picture, presented for a smell etc.) blood will rush to that certain part of the brain. The scanner is traditionally used to diagnose tumours, strokes etc. The other technology used is SST (Steady State Typography) tracking brain waves in real time.

These machines makes it possible to measure the effect of marketing, and show what works and what doesn't - a wet dream come true for marketers! The research concludes, that the vast majority of our purchasing decisions are made unconsciously (both thoughts, dreams and wishes), and as a consequence add(s), commercials, brands and marketing are to be changed drastically - and neuromarketing will lead the way. The ethical dilemma of neuromarketing is also discussed. Other topics that I find especially interesting are the failure of the cigarette warning labels - the have the exact opposite effect - activating the craving spot! Subliminal messaging (marketing under your conscious radar), why we have rituals, the comparison between brands and religion (have you ever considered Apple a religion and do you know, that the same spots are activated in your brain as in one of the major religions e.g. while praying!?), somatic markers (associations between to incompatible elements), and certainly - the scientific research made on "If sex sells?", which leads to surprising conclusions!

An absolute must read!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Easy reading with little added value, 1 Aug. 2010
By 
Marco Lucisano (Stockholm, Sweden) - See all my reviews
This book is a good way to spend some hours reading if you do not care spending quite a lot of time learning remarkably little hard facts. Most potential buyers of this book are possibly not hoping for a masterpiece of popular science literature. If you were looking for one such book to own, than you should keep looking. Granted that the book is easy to read and at times rather interesting, Martin Lindstrom used quite a lot of words to convey his message.

The book presents some experiments planned by the author to study the behaviour of the a regular consumer when we are in a buying situation. The point with the book is to relate a set of instances where traditonal market research methods (for example based on interviews) would fail since we as human beings have little control and knowledge of the brain processes that are involved in taking a decision. Apparently, most buying decision are not concious and at times we are perfectly incapable to describe why we behave in a certain way.

The chapters I appreciated the most focus on sex in advertising (nothing unexpected here but still rather interesting, considering a lot of current disscussion in the media on this very topic) and the discussion on brands and religion and superstition and buyd decisions. This this area I found som facts and concepts that are intersting and exposed from a perspective that I had not considered before reading this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Empty, 17 Feb. 2009
By 
P. Hawley (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Buyology: How Everything We Believe About Why We Buy Is Wrong (Hardcover)
This could have been a good book, but it is empty of anything of real substance. The author's tone of self-aggrandisement rapidly grates on the reader. As popular science books go, this should be well down this list of options.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish - avoid, 5 Nov. 2010
By 
A long string of anecdotes that demonstrates people do have a relationship with their purchases and the brands that are associated with them, and precious little else. No analysis about how, why, or what the implications are. As for a critical response to the endless marketing of trash to make us buy floods of stuff we don't need -- don't make me laugh. This is a truly rotten book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining read but leaving a sense of slight disappointment, 15 Oct. 2011
The book is entertaining, lightly written and pretty fast to read. The thing is that I've set too big expectations after hearing the interview with the author. In fact there is not too much content and if you think you'll know the secrets of why we buy after reading it, you'll be severely disappointed. Is that all that Lindstrom decided to share with us after his million dollar worth examinations?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars How everything we believe about why we buy is wrong? Well perhaps some things., 14 April 2014
By 
Willow (South Coast, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The subhead is a perfect example of the bold claims made in this book which are backed up by illogical conclusions and assumptions or are contradicted by the evidence presented. That said if you can put them to one side then there are some nuggets of gold to be found. Or as the book might say "Nuggets of gold are scattered across every page of this seminal, groundbreaking book."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I regret buying this book, 8 April 2009
By 
Jenna Ross (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Buyology: How Everything We Believe About Why We Buy Is Wrong (Hardcover)
This book is one of the worst I've ever started to read (I could only make a 100 pages). It reads as though it is written by a status conscious individual desperately trying to impress by imagining how he fantasizes other's live, so it impresses not at all. For example, the author gets so excited by an idea that he almost calls the stewardness! The author is no doubt good at hype; I did buy the book. Unfortunately he fails to explain or justify why I bought it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Very readable, very entertaining, 28 Sept. 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This was a good, interesting and readable book, though somewhat superseded by his later book Brandwashed. If you're going to want a fuller picture then read this one of the two first. It's an interesting and easy read. I am not really able to comment on the quality of the science or whether it was fully peer-reviewed and/or replicated.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A good book, but more of an overview of his ..., 14 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A good book, but more of an overview of his studies rather than any in-depth insight or actual technical information. It#'s quite feelgood, quite useful, quite interesting but not enough of any of these to be rated any higher. It's a shame, because it could have delivered so much more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Buyology: How Everything We Believe About Why We Buy Is Wrong
Buyology: How Everything We Believe About Why We Buy Is Wrong by Martin Lindstrom (Hardcover - 28 Oct. 2008)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews