Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

137
4.8 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have seen a few television documentaries and even a two part drama about human trafficking and I can honestly say that nothing prepared me for the brutality I found written within the pages of this book ... conjuring the many, many images that will continue to haunt you long after you have closed the book.

Radhika left her small village home in Kathmandu, Nepal at the age of 15 in the hope of earning some money to educate herself and also to help her family who were living in abject poverty caused by financing a large dowry for their eldest daughter. Little did she know that she would not see her home for many years. At 16 naive Radhika became a helpless victim of a well executed plan by a network of human traffickers. Initially groomed over many weeks by a trafficker named `Lama' who with the promise of a lucrative position as housekeeper to a rich family in the city easily gained Radhika's trust, her reward for this trust is the loss of a kidney, a forced marriage to a family member of one of the human traffickers and months of cruelty.

And it does not stop there!

After her son Rohan is born things get even worse, Radhika's violent husband deserts her and she discovers herself once more in trouble, the human traffickers have not finished with her and she finds herself transferred from brothel to brothel, her son ripped from her arms and taken from her for many months at a time.

Radhika's story is emotionally shattering and even though you know from the outset that Radhika manages to escape and save her son, you wonder how she can find the resolve to achieve this.

Another point of interest is the way Radhika's family reacted to her when she returned home ... so look out for that.

Although shocking and harrowing `Radhika's Story' is a book you will feel compelled to read to the very last page and then you will find yourself re-reading the last few chapters to reaffirm in your own mind that it really is all over for Radhika and her son Rohan.

A more gripping heart rending human story I have yet to read and I congratulate the author Sharon Hendry for bringing this very real global problem to our attention.

An excellent book for reading groups with many points of interest to discuss.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 17 June 2011
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
It's a gripping story, no doubt about it. And everyone loves a story of hope - of someone overcoming difficulty and rising above. It's a universal narrative for a reason.

I didn't like the fact that there were fictionalised sections - I think it would have been more powerful had these been left out. And it also bothered me *immensely* that the writer was a white, Western woman - I have no idea where the profits from this book are going, and the idea of someone profitting from this desperate story is appalling. It also smacks somewhat of exploitism - somewhat the same problem many have with Slumdog Millionaire.

That said, it is a great read, with fascinating cultural background, and you can't help but root for Radhika all the way through.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 January 2011
Had the book since November but didn't have the time to read it! Then went away and one minute I was on Page 28 then the next I was finished!
All the way through you kept thinking ' not again, how could someone, so inocent be so unlucky? How could there be so many nasty people out there in this day and age?'
I can only hope that all the other girls out there in Radhika's situation get the strength that she has and lives to save themselves.
I couldn't read some parts in public because I cried! So I had to sit by myslef and my heart broke but was so encourged that there ARE some good people out there.
A must to read ...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Shocking.
Shocking in as it is a true story. I read this book in one day it was that gripping and is a very easy read that does not demand too much from its reader.

The book is written by a journalist and this is where, for me to a certain extent it fails.
Well perhaps fails is too strong a word.. looses its dramatic impact a little perhaps?

Let me explain.
If it were written first hand by Radhika it would be much mor gripping.
For example where Radhika is forced into prostitution she is reported by Sharon Hendy to have serviced 30 men that day.

Now imagine how that snippet would have been written in the first hand by Rahhika herself and you will see my point? It depersonalizes it a little.

I do appreciate that this may smack of titilation but I assure you that the sheer horror of the situation is lessened.(hence the deduction of one star)

Never the less Sharon Hendry has done an excellent job otherwise. I enjoyed the interesting details of the Nepalese and this is what gives extra depth to the narrative.

It is a sad story with an outcome better than expected. I'm not giving the plot away that there is a happy ending because the book does this itself with the selection of photographs placed halfway through the book showing a smiling Rahhika!

Time and time again I asked myself why didn't Radhika try to escape when she was transported to another brothel when she had Rohan with her...

It makes one thankful that we live in the UK and gives a whole new insight to how women were once regarded even in the UK 2 centuries past, imagine if we did not have equality today would women be in similar positions here too. Perhaps when we in the UK shore up and defend coutries were women are treated as second class at best, property at worst are we turning a blind eye in the name of respect for customs if we ignore 50 per cent of the population?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I should say right from the start that this book is not an easy read. Not that it isn't written well - it is. The author sets a good pace, neither lingering over dreadful details nor glossing over them. Rather it is not an easy read because of the story it tells you. A story that you probably would rather not hear about, and yet a story we should all know. The depressing and hateful consequences of fulfilling a "market" for cheap & easy sex and the equally depressing outcome of the wonderful medical advances that allow lives to be saved by the miracle of organ transplants.

These things come together in one (real) woman's life story. And yet clearly it could be the life story of many thousands - maybe even millions - of women. It's hard to find hope here; the womans whose story this is finally finds help and support. But interwoven in her story are the stories of other lives - woefully few - who helped her at various points and about whose fate she (and we) are left fearfully wondering.

It makes you want to weep for our broken world and for the wickedness which human beings can sink to. But buy this book anyway - in so doing, you're contributing to an organisation which is doing it's best to help the survivors of such experiences, albeit few & in one small corner of the continent.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 17 March 2013
I was very well aware before reading this book that human trafficking crosses the world. I wanted to read it(but with trepidation)to educate myself more, not be an "ostrich" as one reviewer has said & almost in honour of the courage of Radhika & clearly so many women like her around the world in their ability to survive the horrors they have experienced & for many, many who are still experiencing such terrible things as I write. I find it terribly hard to understand as a world society that despite increased awareness, charity etc etc that such evil is flourishing none the less. For some, poverty I suppose & for some just pure greed. Regardless, I still can't get my head around why people do such terrible things to other humans.

In the UK we need to remember that we are also undoubtedly an end destination in the sex trafficking industry. At least 2 decades ago I read an article in a newspaper about a prostitute from the Kings X area whose pimp had hit her hands endlessly with a hammer until her fingers split (together with other horrendous things to make her compliant) Women find it hard enough to escape a home domestic violence situation in the UK (despite all the support networks and the Judicial system we have which the likes of poor Radhika don't have the priveledge to enjoy) particularly those that are mothers let alone something on this huge, slickly operated scale even just in Nepal & India. To be 16, have your kidney "harvested" (another terrible trade)& to have subsequently endured so much. Lets face it some people with less resolve have not & will not survive. For some literally a death sentence. Leaves me speechless.

Re some of it being fictional I really didn't need more detailed horror to validate her story. Very well written in my view. Some repetition yes but for heavens sake does that matter given the rest of it.

What a woman, what an inspiration, what a mother, what a daughter and ultimately what a survivor. In her circumstances I have huge doubts that I could have been so courageous but we all like to think we would be. I hope with all my heart that the friends that helped her escape to freedom are still alive & that Radhika & Roshan continue to move forward to the best they possibly can.

I could go on more because I feel so strongly about it but suffice to say thank you Sharon Hendry, to Joanna Lumley for her support of the book which I think says a lot given her stance with the Ghurkas as well. I do wish that if not the case that the proceeds from this book go to maitinepal to help continue their invaluable work. No one but no one should make money out of or take advantage of someone elses protracted distress/story.

If I could be half the woman & mother under such circumstances that Radhika was & is I would be proud. And as for Anurahda Koirala founder of Maiti Nepal if the world was full of people like her it would be such a better place.....
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 20 August 2012
This book tells the gripping true story of how a young naive Nepalese girl was trafficked into the sex industry. It tells how the love for her baby son kept her going and of her determination to find a way for them both to escape the evil situation they were in.

I think the book was well written. So much happened to her & I just wanted to keep reading to find out what happened next. There were tense moments as I hoped for a better outcome to what was happening & sad moments on other pages. I just kept willing that she was going to make it back to her family.

I don't think there was anything that I didn't like about this book. It was very informative of what is happening in the world regarding human trafficking. I'd recommend it to anyone who is interested in finding out about trafficking as it certainly gave me a far clearer picture of what's going on. There are also some helpful websites and statistics listed at the back of the book.

I'd give it a 10 out of 10 & call it a 'Must Read'. People need to be aware of what is going on so that we can all do our bit to help stop this!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 19 June 2012
I have always enjoyed Joanna Lumley's documentaries and I knew she had done a lot of work with human rights organizations. This book was a page turner from the get go. She certainly didn't disappoint. I couldn't stop reading it. I felt like I was there with Radhika as she told her harrowing story. Its beyond belief that in this day and age the things she went through happened. If your interested in strong women stories that go against all odds this is the book for you. I think everyone should read this book because it brings the awful pain of human trafficking to light. The practice of Human Trafficking needs to be wiped out for good its a disgusting,deplorable, thing to do on humans. This book esp struck a cord because we as women always complain we don't have very many rights here in the west but when you look at other countries we have got it good! And we need to help the women around the world to be able to live a safe life to raise their children in a stable society. I would without a doubt recommend this to my friends. And a very decent price as well.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 15 March 2011
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Radhika was only 15 when she was "offered a job" as a housekeeper to a rich family in Katmandhu. Initially treated very well by the family she trusted them and wished to repay their kindness by working hard for them. Her naivite and innocence resulted in her being drugged and awaking only to find that her kidney had been removed and given to the woman of the house who needed it to save her life - there never had been any job.
She was subsequently forced into marriage to ensure she could not tell the authorities of her experience. Her husband mentally and physically abused her finally leaving her destitute with a small son, Rohan. Life got even worse for Radhika when supposed cousins of her husband took her and her one year old son to a brothel. Initially she was treated well, allowed to play with her son, eat well and rest.She thought things were going to be ok until one day, the Madame of the brothel burst in, removed Rohan and told Radhika she had to start earning her keep - she had been fed and well treated so as she would be more desirable to the men paying for sex with her.
Throughout her experience, Radhika's determination, resilience and love for her son shines through the horror and cruelty she endures. Her story continues until she, and Rohan, are finally able to escape and return to her family. Her experience did not end there, she was rejected from her family home because of marrying beneath her caste, something unforgiveable according to the traditions of her culture, despite the mitigating circumstances.
With the help of her sister, she finally finds peace, comfort and a new beginning at Maiti Nepal, a refuge for victims of trafficking. Maiti Nepal is helping her put the pieces of her shattered life back together again. Rohan is going to school and the refuges legal team, with Radhika's help, were able to identify and prosecute her traffickers. She was not their only victim.
"Radhika's Story" by Sharon Hendry is compelling reading. Radhika is an amazingly courageous woman and it is impossible not to be deeply moved by her story. I can only wish her and her son every happiness in the future. I also wish Maiti Nepal, and all the other organisations fighting against human trafficking, every success at eradicating this evil from society.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 April 2013
This book introduced me to a world I did not know existed. It is a harrowing account of Radhika's life in its early years and is in my
opinion a must read. Her courage and bravery beggars belief.

The discomforting aspect of this book is that there are many thousands of Radhikas in this world today.

solmagwind
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced
I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali (Paperback - 2 Mar. 2010)
£9.98

The Imam's Daughter
The Imam's Daughter by Hannah Shah (Paperback - 29 April 2010)
£8.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)
  -  
Join 1 Million Voices Speak Up For Women