Customer Reviews


64 Reviews
5 star:
 (25)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (11)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not about rabbits
Celebrity novelists are often easy to mock; one always has a suspicion that their work might not have been published had they not been famous. Usually that's a question of quality.

In the case of The Death Of Bunny Munro, the real issue is probably the subject matter. Bunny Munro is not a rabbit, he's a sex maniac - though presumably the reader is supposed to...
Published on 26 Sep 2009 by MisterHobgoblin

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A flawed novel from a great lyricist
Following his wife's suicide, cosmetics salesman and sex addict Bunny Monro takes to the road in his seagull-dropping covered car, together with his nine-year-old son, Bunny Junior. As we follow their tragic journey through Brighton's bleaker suburbs selling lotions and potions, we encounter pre-pubescent girls and giggling housewives, blind pensioners and...
Published on 23 Dec 2009 by Sarah Rayner


‹ Previous | 1 2 37 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Modern, sad and mystifying ...., 25 Jan 2012
By 
Spyke "Spyke" (West Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
... to read this is like seeing a life through someone else's eyes. The life changing events that turn this from bad to worse make it heart wrentching, yet sickening with some of the very adult jokes through out. Sex crazed descriptions lead to the imagination of wondering what was meant by that inuendo?. The horror of having one of the worst things that can happen in a lifetime, and yet, showing little in the way of remorse or any mourneful state and nothing but where the next lay will come from.

At first there is little or no connection between father and son, but through time, tragedy and responcability, Bunny realises he has a son.

I found the first chapter hits you like a brick and you don't see it coming. It's all very fast and full of colour and description. Then the slow down of everything. The slowing of emotions, the speach and the actions. I honestly cried when i read the first few chapters and it made me relate to the characters. I could quite clearly see what was going on and how they felt while they sat on the sofa eatting pizza.

I would recommend this highly to anyone who wants something different to read. It's not a love story as such and it'll beat you black and blue with emotion, modern references and morallity. It's worth every penny paid and every minuet read.

What can I say, I cried reading this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars not for children, 1 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
An excellent, if rude, read. Bunny Monroe is quite a character. And Nick Cave probably is as well. Worth a read
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A lost man's story, 22 Aug 2012
As I like Nick Cave's music I was curious how his novels are, so I went for the Death of Bunny Munroe to read first. I was surprised but somehow his literary style is very close to the musical style. Like the sound and the lyrics of his songs also this is a story of a lost man, lost in alcohol, betraying women and lost his wife, being left alone with his son, not having any clue what to do with his child. The story seems depressing, but it's rather funny to read what is happening there, even though the plot is not a optimistic one.

I have to say that I'm convinced by the literary qualities of Nick Cave but I wished his character was more feminist. It's a retro male model somehow, which probably comes from the image of men in rock and roll in general, I wished there was a bit more of punk influence though.. But that is only a small critique!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The cement mixer in Bunny's head is not a hangover, 21 Sep 2011
The breast on the ceiling is Bunny's unconsciousness. The man with his arm hanging out of the window is a recurring flashback. Looking in the mirror that is Bunny's life is genius. Nick Cave is a genius. This book is misunderstood.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars the talented mr nick cave, 5 Sep 2010
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
The Death of Bunny Munro by Australian singer songwriter Nick Cave is not for the easily offended. It centres around the life of door to door salesman/sex addict Bunny, whose life is spiralling out of control. He has to look after his young son, Bunny Jr, while constantly out of his head and seeking opportunities for sex, with practically anyone or anything. I wanted to take poor Bunny Jr home and adopt him. Bunny Sr has practically no redeeming qualities, but makes for an amusing character. The book is very enjoyable and a quick, fairly easy read, in spite of the crazy sexual thoughts and acts of the star. Nick Cave has a talent for language which has always been evident in his songs, and translates well onto the page.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A Tale of Excessive Appetites!, 28 Aug 2010
By 
Mr. T. J. Armitage (Near Hitchin, Herts United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I am a big fan of Nick Cave's Music and and am not aversed to a lurid tale or two. I enjoyed "and the ass saw the angel" his last biblical stream of consciousness alienation. However this book is so misogynistic and misanthropic I found it hard to complete. The narrator is more than unreliable - possibly the most unlikeable protagonist in modern fiction!? He fantasises about celebrity vaginas, Leaves his wife's funeral to masturbate in a public toilet and neglects his son beyond paternal belief! However he does get his comeuppance but the relish and squalor whereby Cave depicts his misery and the pivotal chapter with his father are shockingly detailed. A real nightmere about a bad son /seed that heaps on the human misery is at times funny, disturbing and always memorable. To enjoy the narrative journey you need a strong stomach and an open mind!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Myxomatosis, 21 Jan 2010
By 
Dave Gilmour's cat (on Dave Gilmour's boat) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
Not for the easily shocked, this novel has some very funny and poignant moments in amongst some extremely horrifying ones. Don't give up with it in the early chapters: it gets better as it goes on, and (without giving anything away here) the ending really works very well.

It's a sort of mor(t)ality tale crossed with a road movie crossed with Brett Easton Ellis's brilliant Lunar Park.

Cave also does a good job of bringing to life the coastal towns around the Brighton area.

Somehow, it's not quite as good as it might have been, perhaps because the early sections felt a bit flat and some of the phrases are a bit clunky.

Overall: flawed, but well worth a read, even if you have never listened to NC's music. Great cover design, too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A depressing read, but I'm happy I read it..., 11 Dec 2009
By 
Moogle (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
When I first started to read this book, i was put off by the offensive language and low morality of Bunny Munro. I thought then, 'I have made a mistake purchasing this book' as it is not the sort of book I read. However, I pushed on with it as I hate not to finish something.

The book made me feel angry, disgusted, ashamed and sad. Yet I still read on to the end, and I have to say that I'm glad I did. It makes a change for me as a reader to be confronted with a character that I cannot emphasize with, and as I struggled to try, I realised that Bunny Munro is not a person you are supposed to like. Instead I felt the shame and self-loathing for Bunny's actions throughout the book, despite the fact that his remorse was only communicated towards the end. The use of hosts and supernatural images worked well and kept me wondering what other parts of Bunny's story were imaginary - such as his perception of himself as 'gifted' with women and the ease at which he could seduce them.

On the whole, it was a book that provoked feelings in me transported me to a world I was unfamiliar with. Glad I stuck with it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unpleasant, disturbing... yet unputdownable, 3 Dec 2009
By 
Matt Pucci "mattpucci.com" (Here, there and everywhere) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
Bunny Munro is one bad dude. A cheating, unscrupulous salesman of beauty products to bored and lonely housewives, Bunny has his world turned topsy-turvy when his long-suffering wife suddenly dies. After a brief period of uncertainty over his future and that of his young son, Bunny decides to carry on doing the only thing he knows how and get back on the road to ply his wares. However, this decision does little for Bunny's sanity as a series of increasingly bizarre experiences befalls the loathsome lothario; his son, Bunny Junior, meanwhile, with the aid of his trusty encyclopedia, attempts to make sense of it all from the passenger seat of his dad's car...

The mind behind this tale is Nick Cave, best known as a recording artist and musician, whose career spans over 30 years, from his early outfit The Birthday Party, through the Bad Seeds, to his most recent incarnation, Grinderman. Let's not forget his numerous contributions to the world of film and cinema, either - as both a writer of soundtracks (The Road) and screenplays (The Proposition) as well as the odd cameo performance (The Assassination of Jesse James...). Or indeed the fact that this is actually his second novel, following And The Ass Saw The Angel, which was published back in 1989. It would be nigh on impossible to sum up such a diverse - and let's be honest, staggeringly impressive - body of work in just a few words, but if there's one term that characterizes Cave's artistic output (besides "unique") it's haunting. Because, whether it's in the lyrics he's written for any one of his aforementioned bands, or the stark soundscapes he creates for the equally barren movies he attaches his name to, Cave succeeds in consistently conjuring up images that linger in the mind long after the CD has stopped, or the film has ended. For better or worse, the same can be said about his prose, too.

Reading Nick Cave requires nerves of steel and a strong stomach. Mixing sex and sordidness, death and destruction, as well as humour and humanity, this is not an easy dish to digest - certainly not in one sitting. Essentially a tale of one man's descent into his own, self-imposed hell, The Death of Bunny Munro at times recalls the likes of Hubert Selby Jr's The Demon, but Cave has a style and a vision all of his own. There are some simply masterful strokes of the pen within this novel, but they are interspersed with stabs of almost comedic crudeness, making it at once a compelling and repulsive read. Bunny's twin obsession with real-life pop stars Avril Lavigne and Kylie Minogue, for example, is so dogged, so unrelenting, and so BASE, that it borders on harassment on the author's part - and yet it's one of the book's funniest motifs. (In fact, Cave makes apologies to both Lavigne and Minogue in his Acknowledgements). The unflinching narrative, meanwhile, which skillfully straddles the blurred line between reality and fantasy, keeps the reader on his toes right up until the final pages.

It's safe to say that this is a novel guaranteed to turn off as many readers as it engages. But once you've accepted - to quote one of Bunny's many conquests - that things are only going to get worse, really, the only option is to read on and bear witness to Bunny's inevitable demise. Thankfully, there are frequent moments of tenderness throughout the book - especially in the passages concerning Bunny Junior and his memories of his mother, and Cave's portrayal of the loyal and loving son gives the story a much needed measure of pathos.

Matt Pucci
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Long live Bunny Munro!, 12 Oct 2009
By 
Elizabeth "Elizabeth" (Leeds, W. Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Death of Bunny Munro (Hardcover)
Being a huge fan of Nick Cave's music and screenplays, Bunny Munro was a dead cert for my bookshelf. Cave's machine-gun writing style is astonishing, more life through a microscope than life through a lens - dark, foreboding and in places, deeply upsetting. That said, being on the road with Bunny Munro and Little Bunny was exhilarating - he is not a likable chap, let's be honest, but underneath that bravado, Bunny has more humanity in his little finger than most people have in their entire bodies. He is a creation from deep inside Cave's psyche; brutally honest, lost, too tired to live, too afraid to make decisions, running away from truth, living in a fantasy world where limits are for mere mortals. It's only when the inevitable happens that the realisation dawns, we have a lost a hero. Long Live Bunny Munro!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 37 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Death of Bunny Munro
The Death of Bunny Munro by Nick Cave (Hardcover - 3 Sep 2009)
6.80
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews