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91
3.9 out of 5 stars
The Rules of the Game
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 12 October 2010
This is one of those books in which the majority of guys that buy it will not complete. There are 30 missions and it isn't easy. For that small percentage that stick with this it will be worth the effort.

Some of the reviews here are suprising as they didn't seem to purchase it knowing what it is. It's not something to sit down, read and entertain. It's a 'how to'. It's something to be applied. It needs to be applied otherwise it's useless. You can't learn how to swim until you jump in the water.

In my opinion this is more like a self-improvement programme with a major social component. Don't think though that a few missions in and girls numbers will be handed to you on a plate. You pretty much have to re-consider everything you've learned before.

This book in my opinion is a very good starter for those wanting to get into 'pick-up'. This alone will give a good guide in itself but if one is serious then more materials are needed (The Game gives you a few ideas of others worth checking out...a bit of research should guide you to the good stuff).

Me and my wing both came to the conclusion after completing the missions in this book that this is ultimately about becoming a better version of yourself. Re-thinking yourself and how the ideas here fit into that. Some of it sticks and some of it is changed or discarded but ultimately as you practice this and other materials (if you get more into the scene) you realise that you are 'naturalising' this stuff.

The stories in the 2nd part of the book are okay and quite amusing at times but nothing great. I will give it 5 stars for the real purpose behind this book.

Im seeing someone now and this certainly helped me on my path. She said to me once that she read the Game: "have you heard of it?" she asked. I paused and said: "no, but my friend mentioned it to me once".
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 11 May 2005
Pierluigi collina is one of the, if not the best referee in the world. He recently wrote and autobiography published under the rather misleading title 'the rules of the game.' Just in case you are wondering, 'the rules of the game.' has nothing to do with the rules of football. It is the autobiography, not Collina's version of the rules of football (soccer). As some other reviewers pointed out earlier, Collina's writing style is not very good, nor is it very stylish. But this may be because he wrote the italian version, who may have been very good, and it was translated by Lain Halliday to English, so this style of writing is not 100% Collina. The straightfoward and blunt sentences may be because Lain Halliday translated it badly, or it may have been badly written in the first place. Either way, Collina did not write the English version of 'the rules of the game.'
I think that the words 'translated by Lain Halliday' should be on the front cover.
Overall, 'the rules of the game' is both interesting and quite infomative, but either Collina's storytelling, or Lian Hallidays's translations went wrong
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 25 June 2004
To all in football Pierluigi Collina is probably the most respected and most identifiable referees that there has ever been, and this book provides the reader with an insight into the mind of a great referee.
Collina attempts to answer many of the questions that a reader might have, discussing such issues as the preparation of a referee before a big game and his thoughts on tv replays. The book is also highly entertaining with Collina describing many difficult situations that have occured on the field during his time as a referee.
The book has been translated from Italian, but nothing has been lost in the translation. I found this book to be highly entertaining and with Collina describing what it takes to be a great referee, my respect for top class referees has grown immeasurably.
A real classic!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 17 September 2004
Pierluigi Collina will always be known for being 'that scary bald ref'. It's easy to classify him as such, but those who have either met the man or seen him outside the football spectrum will know that his fearsome reputation is only applicable to the pitch.
What unravels in this book is a straightforward story of a man who has achieved something most other referee's never attain, respect amongst the football bosses, but most significantly among the players and the fans. He is a family man, kind and caring. What has made him one of the best in his field is his attention to detail and his focus on doing the job he was sent out to do and to do it right.
The book is never going to win any awards, it's nothing out of the ordinary. It's a solid read and will keep you amused, though at times he does get lost in describing in too technical a details the rules, which may lose many a reader. But if you can overcome that aspect then you should be alright with it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 26 March 2013
If it does not work, you have had a laugh along the way.

I like the little games at the end.
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I picked this up, remembering that I had wanted to read this when it first came out. As one of the high profile go-to referees in his prime, Collina was a respected figure that few managers would have any complaints if picked to officate a game. The fact that he refereed a World Cup and Champions League final just reiterates this.

Collina draws mainly upon these two highlights as the meat of this book. Those looking for a "proper" autobiography will be disappointed. He gives a fairly good summary of his youth and formative years near the end but not that many details. He does however delve deeply into his routines and preparation for matches; as well as gives a through account of interacting with refereeing associations in both Italy and internationally.

I look at the previous reviews and I note the negatives all are based upon perceptions which border on silliness.
Collina sets out his book not as an autobiography but more like top chess players writing a book of their own favourite games. A background story, anecdotes, recollections of favourite events interspersed with training methods and regimens to keep you at the top of the game. There is a jewel of three examples of how he earned his fairminded approach to interpreation of the rules, since replicated by the Guardian's and Observer's weekend "You're the Ref" column. He approaches these cases humbly and as a matter-of-factly. He even records quite clearly that the famous Bari-Foggia game, (where the teams switched back to first time positions of play after their goalies encountered on-the- pitch abuse) it was his assistant who first suggested the idea now attributed to him (the columns and football writers who recount this example usually forego this bit)

I would recommend this book to anybody who has an interest in football. There is much to be learnt and his prose in reasserting the third side to a football match ie the referee(besides the opposing teams) reads like classic authors of old. Of course there are gaps (current family life has minimal detail), but people who go out to buy footballers autobiographies tend to gravitate to famous games and training anyway. The other glaring ommission is secondary to the time he wrote this: there was plenty of controversy in the years before his self-induced retirement. I say this because FIFA had been willing to extend the age of retirement of referees mainly with Collina in mind.

I leave you with that parting note because that is the regard I hold Collina, rather than the disdainful tone of some slightly unbalanced accounts of his latter years (see his current wikipedia entry)
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on 13 January 2009
Collina is definitely trying to change is our perception of the referee. I don't suppose there is too much new in his plea that we recognise that the man in the middle is genuinely doing his best and is prone to mistakes like anybody else. That we take into account that refs do what they do for altruistic motives, for a love of the game that can be considered equal (in its own twisted way) to that of most ardent fan. He also goes to great lengths to demonstrate how the fitness, diet, attention to detail, training and assessing of the modern day ref has made him more efficient than ever. Frequent seminars to provide greater consistency, allied to better relations with the players themselves, is providing the highest quality of officiating, and it's improving all the time.

However, Collina wants to change more about our perceptions than just our respect for and treatment of refs. He also appears to wish to change the status of the referee within the actual game itself. The old cliche about the 'best referee not getting noticed' is not for Pierluigi. On the contrary, the referee must be bold, brave, and rather than facilitating the game is a major participant in it, as important as any of the players. What Collina really desires is to 'be a leading character' in the drama that is a football match or major tournament (he's very keen on the film metaphor for life and football). Personally, I find this a little worrying.

Another area where 'The Rules of the Game' is anti-climactic is in its lack of entertaining stories or insights into the big games or superstar players that Collina has handled. I'm afraid that he tells us very little of what it's like to be in the pressure cooker that was England versus Argentina during the last World Cup. We already knew that the last three minutes of the 1999 Champions League Final was 'exciting', but what was it like to give those goals? I'd like to know more about officiating a World Cup Final than how the ref attempted to collect the match ball as a souvenir! Similarly, Collina tells us that David Beckham is his favourite player (a worrying mutual admiration society?), but doesn't tell us why. Collina discusses legends like Baggio, Raul and Baresi, but very briefly, glossing over their talent, and falling to enlighten us at all. In the case of Baresi, he just simply recounts giving him a red card after a mere three minutes of a big Milan versus Roma game and justifies his decision, we learn nothing about one of the greatest defenders ever to have graced the game. Instead the bulk of 'The Rules of the Game' is taken up with excessive minutiae of a referee's existence, it's long winded, over detailed, repetitive and just plain boring in places!

All in all, 'The Rules of the Game' is an opportunity missed. It fails to give any new perspective on the game, it doesn't enlighten or entertain either. It does make some relevant points about the role of the referee, but these points are reiterated again and again to saturation point. Pierluigi is obviously a man who doesn't get bored of his own voice or favourite themes, but I have to admit that I tired of them quickly. The book was originally written in Italian and maybe part of its humour and the flow of its narrative was lost in the translation to English - but I doubt it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 2004
I didn't quite know what to expect from this book. However once I picked it up I couldn't put it down. It provides a great insight into what it is like to be a referee at the highest level, and shows that even referees have personalities! After reading his book I have the upmost respect for Collina, an honourable man who is a credit to football and refereeing. On the minus side perhaps more anecdotes would have been nice and maybe a little short for the money.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 19 July 2013
This is a step by step book,to find your perfect Mate,I found it very interesting,a real eye opener, for me.You will never be lonely again,Just got to read the book.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on 26 July 2010
This is a book in two parts. The first part is a series of exercises to carry out at your own pace that are meant to get you started as a pick up artist. Here's the thing the book warns you not to read ahead and sticking to that rule I haven't. The first couple of exercises have been pretty basic stuff, talk to strangers - get use to it and set your self some goals in life, that kind of thing; to be honest I almost skipped ahead but decided not to in case I miss something. It will be interesting to see how this develops or if I get around to doing the rest and over what period of time; the book suggest an exercise per night but how much time per exercise is down to practicalities and self motivation.

Like all such books the reading is the easy part, actually following the advice is the hard part, which is no doubt why so many spend £00's on seminars and practical boot camps where you go out and are thrown in the deep end and more or less forced to start talking to girls; it's like the gym it's much easier to exercise with a personal trainer to "encourage" you.

The second part of the book is Neil's diaries. These are a collection of short stories that usually illustrate a point.
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