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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lies and spin - how to do both from a position of power., 24 April 2010
By 
Mrs. Margot J. Dunn (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought Lance Price's book specifically for the chapters on Tony Blair and Gordon Brown and read them together with his frightening The Spin Doctor's Diary. I have lent the books to friends who have had exactly the same reactions to both books that I have had. The Spin Doctor's Diary is a masterclass how to spin and lie and the Where the Power Lies sets it in context.

With the aid of these two books you will never again be taken in by the lies and spin of politicians from both the major parties. You will see how it is done and how they keep on doing it. The newspapers of course collude since the press releases handed out saves them the bother of actually ferreting out the truth.

The books are a fascinating peek into the corridors of power not normally on view and usually kept well-hidden. After all if we all found out we had been lied to where would politics be? They are also incidentally a good read!

PS have just purchased Andrew Rawnsley's book and watched in fascination as the spin doctors had a go at him and his backstage/frontstage story
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spin doctors and hacks, 22 April 2010
By 
I cannot recommend this book highly enough. This is a perfect read for anyone with the barest interest in: history, journalism, current affairs. A book balanced between recounting past PMs and dissecting the recent past, this will give anyone a thorough grounding in the gaffes and ingenious policies of times gone by. I especially liked Price's forthright comments about the "new" state of play between journos and politicos since the expenses crisis. Fantastic reading altogether.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thoughtful and readable, 11 Jan. 2012
By 
This review is from: Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media (Paperback)
This is a thoughtful and very readable book.Price combines knowledge drawn from his previous experience as a journalist and political spin doctor with a thoughtful and objective view of the often tense relationship between the media and politicians.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb bit of reading, 26 Jun. 2012
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This review is from: Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media (Paperback)
I had bought Lance Price's ''The Spin Doctor's Diary'' which I haven't enjoyed as much as this. The book is well written with tons and tons of information that will make you gasp in horror. My favourite quote from the book thus far (as I haven't read all of it) has to be when Lloyd George had a party and one of the guests was Oswald Mosley the British fascist leader. Oswald remarked ''this will hit the roof if it gets out''. Lloyd George then replied '' My dear boy if everything I have done in this hotel during the last 40 years had got out, you have no idea how many times I would have had to retire from politics''.
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4.0 out of 5 stars politicians and the media - do they deserve each other?, 4 Aug. 2012
By 
markr - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media (Paperback)
This is an interesting account of the relationships between the media and Prime Ministers from Lloyd George to Gordon Brown. Some like Thatcher and Blair made good relations with the media a key element of their governing strategy. Other like Heath and Attlee took little interest in what the press, TV and radio had to say about them.

The book makes it clear that that senior politicians and the press are rather bound together - the politicians need the media to get their messages out, and the media need access to key politicians, or their spokespeople, for scoops and background colour. The relationship is often adversarial as well as mutually dependant- rather like two exhausted boxers holding each other up whilst trading punches.

The author is particularly strong on recent prime ministers - and his own relationships with them, either as a journalist, or as the deputy to Alistair Campbell under Tony Blair, add colour to what at times is a little dry. However the misuse of spin, and the damage it can do to the politicians involved is made clear - particularly in relation to the Brown government, of which it is apparent that the author was no fan.

It is probably fair to say that neither the majority of media nor most politicians emerge in a creditable light - too often their behaviour is ammoral at best

Overall an interesting account, though sometimes the narrative is a little dry and could perhaps have benefited from being cut down a little
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4.0 out of 5 stars an unholy embrace, 4 Aug. 2012
By 
markr - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This is an interesting account of the relationships between the media and Prime Ministers from Lloyd George to Gordon Brown. Some like Thatcher and Blair made good relations with the media a key element of their governing strategy. Other like Heath and Attlee took little interest in what the press, TV and radio had to say about them.

The book makes it clear that that senior politicians and the press are rather bound together - the politicians need the media to get their messages out, and the media need access to key politicians, or their spokespeople, for scoops and background colour. The relationship is often adversarial as well as mutually dependant- rather like two exhausted boxers holding each other up whilst trading punches.

The author is particularly strong on recent prime ministers - and his own relationships with them, either as a journalist, or as the deputy to Alistair Campbell under Tony Blair, add colour to what at times is a little dry. However the misuse of spin, and the damage it can do to the politicians involved is made clear - particularly in relation to the Brown government, of which it is apparent that the author was no fan.

It is probably fair to say that neither the majority of media nor most politicians, emerge in a creditable light - too often their behaviour is ammoral at best

Overall an interesting account, though sometimes a little dry, which could perhaps have benefited from being cut down a little
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4.0 out of 5 stars Reinforces what everyone knows, 16 July 2011
By 
D. W. Miller "dmiller945" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
I found this a really interesting read although telling us little that we already did not know or guess about the way that we and events that affect us are manipulated by politicians.
Well written and for the most part open when describing the part that the author played in some of these deceptions.
I am left with the feeling that a few politicians are operating in what they see as the best interest of the people of this country but far too many once they reach the top, are looking at their place in history rather than dealing with matters in an honourable way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 Feb. 2015
Outstanding
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Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media
Where Power Lies: Prime Ministers V the Media by Lance Price (Paperback - 3 Mar. 2011)
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