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52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent: insightful, eloquent --- and angry
Those familiar with Ferdinand Mount's more literary works will know already that he writes beautiful, clear English. Those familiar with his 'social' works and his autobiography will be aware of his insight and perception. Those familiar with the history of his career -- columnist for the Daily Telegraph, The Spectator and Standpoint and chief of Mrs Thatcher's Downing...
Published on 5 May 2012 by Barton Keyes

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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars IMPORTANT BUT SHALLOW
Ferdinand Mount's "The New Few" is destined to be an important book, contributing to the national debate despite its superficial analyses and anemic prescriptions.

"Few" is an important book because its headline topics of income inequality and the alienation of the masses have visceral appeal in today's disgruntled society and because its author is not a...
Published on 12 May 2012 by Diacha


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incisive analysis, 16 May 2013
By 
C. M. Knowles (Gloucestershire, England) - See all my reviews
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The best minds are the least uncluttered and therefore the most clear-headed. Add to this a facility for unadorned and elegant English and you have, in this case, a book that tells you all you need to know about why the UK has become lifeless politically and economically. For those of a fundamentalist or revolutionary frame of mind, this book is not, perhaps, for you, as it reflects a conservative (small 'c') point of view. But it is asking for significant change in how we do things now, and is asking for a return to a time when institutions at their best were methodical and fair, when we, the public, felt that we had a stake in events, either through Parliament as voters or in business as shareholders. On reflection, I think that anyone of any political persuasion would find it hard to quibble with what is written here and anyone taking the trouble to read it will find themselves agreeing with just about every point made. No abstruse theories here, just plain common sense limpidly expressed. As books on this subject go, it is a page-turner and highly recommended.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everbody should read it, 2 May 2013
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If you have any interest in what has gone wrong in Britain and what is still going wrong then this is the author for you. It has opened my eyes.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting., 15 Dec 2012
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This review is from: The New Few: Or a Very British Oligarchy (Hardcover)
Loved it and bought another one for our son.He also thought it very informative and gives one food for thought.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good account of the rise in inequality in the UK over the past 30 years, 4 Dec 2012
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Runaway rises in salaries and bonuses, led by the banks, combined with modest increases followed by cuts after the crisis have caused rapidly rising inequality. This is all explored together with the concentration of power to great effect by Mr Mount.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seeking answers to your frustration with government?, 2 Jun 2012
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Read The New Few by Ferdinand Mount. It's everything you want to know about why we all feel so frustrated with both local and central government, and Europe in particular. Do you want to know where your money goes, if you've got any to save? Why have all our utility bills become sooooo expensive and why are some of our jobs going to asylum seekers. Although not a political animal myself, I understand now, after reading this book, that the gulf between rich and poor has become wider. And has now escalated to 400% for top management. 30 years ago, it was accepted practice that a fair income for top managemnt was 20% more than the average worker. Read about top CEO's and Bankers greed, raking in millions of 's which has now spread to virtually all company managers and anyone else that's in with the in crowd.........
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars jf2, 12 Jun 2012
By 
John (Essex UK.) - See all my reviews
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Somewhat pretentious waffle mixed in an attractive style of writing.
The only theme that I came away with is the formation of a Political Oligarchy as if this is something new.
No remedy is proposed that might substitute people of worth for the PR, Journo, Legal and Union scrimshankers that we have in Westminster, Cardiff, Edinburgh and Brussels. We badly need a leaven of Engineers, Employers, Doctors (of Medicine not Sociology) and others of experience.
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5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Thatcherite still can't see his failings, 14 May 2013
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Starts off with an objective analysis of the problems and greed in the boardroom and the failure of demorcracy in politics, however, he soon shows that he is a one eyed Tory with disgraceful attacks on Blair.
As far as the social underclass he refers to as a blight on our society he should remember that he was a principle architect with Thatcher of creating this divide .
His proposal of fairness and reform of the system by voluntary living wage increases is beyond belief, does he in his wildest imagination ever think, that the rich and selfish board directors are going to share their ill gained spoils with the working classes. Surely this is a person who has got no concept of what is needed to reform our society. His admiration of the coalition is totally ill founded when you consider the reduction in the top rates of income tax and the attack on the welfare state. As Osbourne said 'we are all in this together' then he rages that he is not going to raid the 'rich' to pay for reforms. It is about time. It is about timel the government of this country started to develop some social justice for all levels in society not just trying to appease the 'few'.
As far as business is concerned where do we see competition driving down costs in the privatised utilities. ( all foreign owned - I cannot imagine for one moment the French allowing the Paris electricity company being owned by the British) . Corporate greed has seen the boardrooms sell out to the highest bidder at an alarming rate, to the extent, that there are very few British owned companies Left. I 'd ask the question why have we not seen the same sale of companies in France and Germany. Why is this government trying to change employment laws to make redundancy easier to enact, is it to make it easier to sell off this countries assets for personal gain.
I have always had conservative values but I despair at what it see for the future for this country.
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The New Few: Or a Very British Oligarchy
The New Few: Or a Very British Oligarchy by Ferdinand Mount (Hardcover - 26 April 2012)
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