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96 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AAAAAAAAAAAGGGHHH WE'RE PREGNANT !!!!!!
After the initial shock of learning that in almost no time at all there's going to be a mini me squawking up at me for food, nappy change, cuddles,etc. I realised just how unprepared I was and how little I knew. So being a bit of an informationaholic the quest began. This book happily was the second one I picked up and it does not disappoint.

It's broken into...
Published on 8 Jun 2009 by Foxylock

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so good
I bought this book after having looked at it the book shop for 3 months, not daring to buy it until after my first scan! After waiting all that time I was disappointed. The information isn't that great or detailed and after a while my husband banned me from reading it as I worred about some of the things mentioned in it. The book was a waste of money, I bought other,...
Published on 24 Jan 2009 by hanbee


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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Informative, but outdated on employment and gender roles, 4 May 2012
This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
As other reviewers have said, this is a thorough and informative guide to pregnancy. The tone and assumptions are often very jarring, however. The advice about 'keeping on working' through the pregnancy (as if most women have the choice to drop their careers when they conceive, or would wish to do so!) is relatively superficial. As the relationship between career, career progression, and pregnancy is a major issue for many women, not to mention probably the greatest source of stress during pregnancy, it is a shame that this book fails to deal with the issues properly.

Similar things could be said of the chapter written for the father. Why would Murkoff assume that the fathers wouldn't just read the whole book? Why do fathers need a separate section explaining to them that they should be considerate of a woman suffering the effects of pregnancy? And why is most of the section devoted to what they can expect of their pregnant wife as a sexual partner? This whole approach assumes that men need to be helped to perform the most basic acts of empathy and are going to be more concerned about their sex life than about anything else. There is also a tedious amount of material reassuring women that if they put on weight and their breasts enlarge, this will make them MORE desirable to their partner (which is presumed to be a major concern for a pregnant woman). All this nonsense seems to reinforce a very 1950s idea of gender stereotypes.

I hope that future editions of this book will update these areas - as it is, the claim of the book to be 'completely revised and updated' is a bit unconvincing. Murkoff should read Rebecca Asher's 'Shattered: Modern Motherhood and the Illusion of Equality' - which I would also recommend to all expectant parents so that they can avoid falling into the damagingly polarised roles inadvertently promoted by this book, and in many other places.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ONLY book you need, 11 Sep 2009
By 
H. May (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
I have 7 other pregnancy books and this is the only one i now use. I found this book extremely useful as it put your mind at ease about symptoms or lack of. It gives you infromation week by week as well as overall.

The book is originally American and that does come through in this UK version but it has been adapted accordingly.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Personally think there are better books out there, 24 Dec 2013
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I bought this book because it's known as THE book to get but I'm not sure it really deserves this title anymore. Despite the fact it is updated and written for a British audience, the layout and language still betrays its American roots. I read this on my Kindle and found the layout you often have with American books, where boxes of text sit within the main text quite annoying on the Kindle as it meant you'd be part way through a sentence and then need to skip through the next 3 pages of boxed text and remember where you left off. I personally found the Netmums series and the Dr Miriam Stoppard (which has plenty of pictures) more useful.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Its useful to dip in to along the pregnancy journey, 19 Sep 2014
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Its useful to dip in to along the pregnancy journey, and covers every possible symptom and pregnancy related concern - a good handbook, but should not be taken as gospel - it is possibly overly cautious
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Chaotic & Annoying, 2 May 2011
This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
I personally found this book really annoying. The author writes in a very tabloid style and constantly makes puns and 'witty' little asides. There is a wealth of information in the book, but the TV presenter style in which it is put across distracts from the details. Furthermore, the layout of the book is visually overwhelming with the text presented in narrow columns and too many headings, sub headings and bullet points. My final point is that the information is all over the place, there is no sense of a logical journey through your pregnancy, which I think has also been pointed out by another reviewer.

I can understand why this book has had good reviews as it is jam packed with information, however for a far clearer and equally informative reference book I would recommend "Your Pregancy Bible" by Dr Anne Deans, which I have found myself turning to again and again, and have no trouble finding exactly what I'm looking for without the stylised narration.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For the most part, this book has been very useful, 14 Feb 2014
By 
Rachel (Edinburgh, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
People seem to either love or hate this book, but I think I'm somewhere in between. It's not the kind of book you sit down and read from start to finish, and there are some bits I skipped completely (the sections on having multiples, dealing with long-term illness and pregnancy, etc). For the most part, I found it useful as a reference book. It has details on what the baby is doing each week and month, and lists of symptoms and problems you might be having and how to deal with them, and answers relevant questions you might be having. I appreciated that it often dealt with both sides of the situation e.g. what to do if you're gaining a lot of weight early on, or if you aren't gaining any at all. It doesn't project any idea of "This is exactly how you should feel/act/look at this stage in your pregnancy", which I definitely appreciated.

The index is also fantastic, so you can look up a particular symptom of ailment and focus on that. For example, I'd heard that a lot of women experience backache later in their pregnancies, but I was getting really uncomfortable pains around 6-8 weeks, and I was worried as some people said this was a sign of miscarriage. But according to my book, it was probably just my uterus expanding, and it gave detailed instructions on what to do if the pain persisted, or was accompanied by other symptoms. I felt a whole lot more comfortable looking issues up in this book rather than frantically Googling them!

The chapters on labour were actually really helpful, and not frightening in the slightest (perhaps because I've been told hundreds of horror stories already!) and I appreciated that they discussed different forms of pain relief (as opposed to some books, which act like it's either an epidural or nothing) and the benefits of different labouring positions. It does discuss some worst-case scenarios, and what to expect if you do have to have an emergency C-section, etc, which I appreciated as I probably wouldn't have thought to research this given how low-risk my pregnancy has been so far.

This book does have a few pitfalls. First, it has a section on what to expect at each medical appointment each month, which doesn't actually line up with what happens in the NHS, even though my book was the British edition. In the UK, you don't see a midwife until you're around 10 weeks along, unless there's a pressing need. Some of the details they gave about what to expect at these appointments didn't match my experience, or what my NHS information lists (for example, no pelvic exams until late in the third trimester)--so beware of this, if you're British.

I ended up skipping most of the section about diet and exercise as it made me feel like the most unhealthy person on the planet, when I know that I'm not. Due to my IBS, there are some apparently "healthy" things that I just can't eat (too much wholemeal or raw vegetables) so I simply couldn't follow some of the suggestions. (Also, is there anyone who can attest that eating lots of wholemeal bread/rice/pasta and raw veg actually helps ease constipation? Most IBS literature suggests the absolute opposite of what this book states). I've found that a lot of the exercises suggested in pregnancy books are aimed at either a) women who drive everywhere and never exercise at all and need to up their game or b) have a serious exercise regime and go to the gym every day and need pregnancy-appropriate exercises. There's always a little bit tacked on to the end of every exercise chapter that says something like "Of course, cardio-vascular exercise is ideal in pregnancy" which always makes me sigh with relief since I walk everywhere that's less than 3 miles away from our house. If you have a crap diet and don't exercise at all, read this chapter. If you're into extreme dieting and exercise, it's probably going to be useful as well. But if you eat healthily and add exercise into your daily routine naturally, you can probably skip it.

This is more a personal annoyance, but in translating to the British edition, the majority of the measurements in this book are in metric and this was a bit confusing to me as I've always done my weight and height in stones/pounds and feet/inches--and I don't think I'm the only British person like this! Telling me that I'd gain so many kilos when I was pregnant or that my baby would weigh so many grams confused me as everyone I know who has had a baby recently has talked about their baby's weight in pounds and ounces. I kind of wished they'd used both imperial and metric measurements as I feel like a lot of British people alternate between them.

The sections on what the baby is doing each week are pretty brief, but you can always supplement these with addition information from a website like BabyCenter.com. I did wish there had been a picture for each week, rather than each month, but the book does list the size of the baby each week and what fruit it resembles most in size, which was a fun way to visualise it.

I've not completely finished this book, since I'm reading about each month as it arrives, but I worked through most of the other relevant chapters before the end of the year. For the most part, this book has been very useful. If it doesn't include enough information on a certain symptom or aspect of pregnancy I often look it up somewhere else, but it's a good base point for any worries and it stops me getting freaked out over something on the internet. Not everything is going to be relevant to every reader, and in some ways I'm glad that it covers all the bases because while I might be looking up every possible remedy for morning sickness, I can glance across the page and think, "Well, at least I don't have heartburn yet!"
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What to Expect when you're Expecting, 20 Aug 2013
By 
V. L. Ferreira (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
Well, this book was a waste of money.
The tone of the book is paternizing... and the puns, oh my word, seriously? The pictures are rubbish and there is no scientific explanation for anything. It's obviously a book wrote on common sense (sometimes not even that) more than anything else. It's alarmist, but then it adds: "it's normal, don't worry"... everything is normal, don't worry, so I stopped reading it because whatever it was, it was normal (again no explanation, I'd expect a why you're feeling this and how can you make it better, but noooo, just read the unfunny joke and carry on). The book often contradicts itself too. You can get better founded information on the internet for free.
The bit about what to expect when you go to the midwife or doctor this month is not at all acurate with the UK reality (at least for me it wasn't).
The only bit that was useful was the chapter for fathers. I asked my husband to read it and it gave him a reasonable understanding on what our bodies go through during pregnancy.
I would not recommend to anyone. Too much hype for nothing.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Over-rated., 5 Jan 2013
This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
We bought this book because it was recommended by friends. I understand that it would have been a revelation when it was launched, but when you have other choices such as the Mayo Clinic Guide - What to Expect is a waste of money. I HATE IT. It's not written by a doctor and it shows. It ought to be titled What to Read to Make Yourself Neurotic When You're Expecting. For example, the chapter on what to eat is absurd. It divides everything into food groups and instructs you to eat a certain number of portions from each - if you are not someone with an eating disorder, or a control freak with tons of time on your hands, why would you bother with this?
It tells you briefly not to eat nitrites or nitrates during pregnancy by avoiding bacon and sausages - but nitrites occur naturally in leeks and spinach. Scientific data on this is actually conflicting, and there is actually no scientific evidence of what significant consumption of nitrites means for a fetus. It's better to explain this than refer to it in a paragraph and simply advise you not to eat anything with nitrites or nitrates, which is just plain irresponsible.
What to Expect is a good example of the rubbish being peddled by an industry that seeks to scare women with unsubstantiated claims, and no relation to science - though we live in 2012, pregnancy is the one condition that is subject to this. Much of this book is just plain common sense.
You're encouraged to buy everything under the sun when you're having a baby, or have one. Just buy the Mayo guide instead and save your money. It's more sensible and less alarmist.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Pregnancy Reading, 15 Jun 2011
This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
I used this book throughout my whole pregnancy, its an essential book especially for a first time mother to be
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Informative read - still pick it up every week to follow progress of baby growth, 6 Feb 2010
By 
J. N. Prentice "Shazz" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: What to Expect When You're Expecting (Paperback)
I purchased this book to read in the first trimester when we first found out we were pregnant with twins. Although with twin pregnancies I would recommend purchasing an additional, more detailed book on nutrition, I have found this book to be very informative as an introduction to pregnancy. It has come as a comfort to read about the many pregnancy symptoms that you will encounter and, if otherwise not informed, would perhaps be quite worried about. It has helped to put my mind at ease that all my symptoms are perfectly normal and this book has been a constant reference for me. In addition to this, another great aspect of the book is the information on the progress of baby growth on a week by week basis to help keep you in tune with baby development (especially during the weeks between scans). If you do not plan on giving birth in the UK, there are many references to the use of a midwife that may not apply to your situation. However, the base content of the book applies to all. I highly recommend this book for a first trimester read and as a repeat reference beyond the first trimester.
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What to Expect When You're Expecting
What to Expect When You're Expecting by Sharon Mazel (Paperback - 6 April 2009)
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