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on 17 June 2009
I was recently given this book which promises to "increase your MySQL productivity and control by discovering the real power of phpMyAdmin 3.1". I was a little skeptical at first of a book on phpMyAdmin, the most widely used MySQL admin tool, especially when it arrived at 325 pages! However, there is a huge amount of information that really is very useful to every PHP developer out there whether you are a beginner or an advanced user.

Now, most people I've mentioned the book to have scoffed and said something along the lines of "I already know how to use phpMyAdmin". Like them, I thought I knew what phpMyAdmin was and what it could do but it turns out there are huge amounts of functionality I never knew existed in MySQL let alone in phpMyAdmin!

The book starts off with a very gradual introduction to phpMyAdmin covering everything from basic installation and setup to a detailed explanation of the overall interface. I was particularly pleased to see an in-depth chapter on security configuration at the beginning of the book which would help any newcomer make sure that their setup is completely secure - usually such chapters are found at the back in the appendices! The first six chapters follow in a similar vein with very basic information about how to run SQL queries, edit data, change structures, and so on but chapters seven and eight deal with exporting and importing data which is one of the many areas that I have seen developers struggle with in the past. There is a good explanation of the different methods for importing / exporting including the benefits of certain types over others. Crucially, there is a section on CSV using LOAD DATA which is something that has always seemed to lack proper explanation to me in the past.

There then follows a few more chapters which more advanced users can probably skip such as searching, an overview of relational databases, and table / database operations.

I would say that the real meat of the book for experienced PHP developers begins at chapter thirteen with each further chapter adding useful knowledge. I've listed the key highlights of these chapters below:

* The Multi-Table Query Generator - A powerful tool which enables you to fine tune complex queries via a series of forms thus allowing you to specify multiple criteria. It contains features such as automatic joins which allow you to very easily build up complex queries.

* Bookmarks - A feature I was completely unaware of that allows you to save queries for future use. This is particularly useful if you happen to be a database administrator that administers purely on a table by table basis within phpMyAdmin and has a number of queries to run. I always used to have popular queries I'd use stored in a notepad on my OS X Dashboard but no need anymore!

* System Documentation - I recently had a need to produce some MySQL documentation so was very happy to read this chapter and find out about the excellent documentation tools available within phpMyAdmin. This includes not only a basic print view, but also a data dictionary and a relational schema which are all exported as PDFs.

* MIME-Based Transformations - If you're the kind of developer that likes to store images, etc, as BLOB fields. With transformations, you can make images appear as images within the phpMyAdmin results rather than as indecipherable encoded text. Very useful!

* MySQL 5.0 and 5.1 - a quick look at the enhancements that MySQL 5 added with things such as views, routines, stored procedures, and very interestingly, triggers (a way to run other MySQL commands when a certain thing happens - e.g. when a table gets updated). You'd probably want a separate book to cover MySQL 5 if you were planning on doing any development with it, but this chapter gives you a good overview of some of the things you can expect.

* MySQL Server Administration - The final chapter deals with some of the more fundamental maintenance tasks related to the actual server and improvements that can be made with caching etc as well as a good comparison of the different types of storage engine you can choose.

All in all, I would highly recommend this book to any PHP developer or anybody that is using phpMyAdmin on a regular basis. It could really have been broken into two books - a beginners and an advanced - but it works well by acting as a reference for those developers that have grown up using phpMyAdmin. The main thing though is that it taught me a great deal about phpMyAdmin that I didn't realise was even there - just goes to show that even a basic sounding book can have a great deal to offer.
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on 10 July 2009
Last year, I reviewed Mastering phpMyAdmin 2.11 for Packt, and said it was overall a comprehensive book, but with a few points that I would change.

I was sent a copy of Mastering phpMyAdmin 3.1 a few weeks ago and after reading it, I can see that most of the points I mentioned have been addressed, and I know from other sources that the points that were not changed have good reasons for them (screenshots and we/our speech are very good for people that are not familiar with the subject).

There are many reviews of this book already online, so I will mostly describe how this edition is different from the previous one. In short, though, I would say that this version is much more readable, and is still the best book to buy if you want a book on phpMyAdmin.

Things that are improved

I suggested last year that the 5 page date-by-date history of phpMyAdmin's delivery be moved from the front of the book to an appendix. At the time, the book didn't have an appendix. The new edition has two appendices - the first one is for the history, as suggested, and the second contains the old book's chapter 20 on Troubleshooting. The short history of MySQL at the beginning of the MySQL 5.0 chapter has also been removed - it had no purpose.

A few of the unnecessary screenshots have been removed. I understand the need for screenshots, as they sometimes describe better than mere text what the author means when he says something, but my complaint from last year was that screenshots that were simply not necessary had been put in apparently just to take up space. This has been improved this year, with many of the redundant images removed.

SQL code screenshots have been replaced with just the text of the SQL. This makes the examples much easier to read.

Language issues, such as switching collations, had originally been a full chapter, but is now spread out in the book, where appropriate. This is good, as when exporting a backup (for example), you don't want to have an important part of the explanation, collation, hidden away at the back of the book.

A lot of the "since 2.6.1', "since 2.6.0' wording has been removed. This is good, as the reader of the book is obviously using version 3.1 or higher. The author does sometimes mention the version number when adding new text, and I think that's unnecessary - the reader really should not need to know what version of phpMyAdmin a new feature was introduced in. The book is about 3.1; let's leave it at that.

phpMyAdmin itself has a number of new minor features that are detailed in the new book. For example, exports (SQL dumps) can be done to Texy! text format, the search wizard has been improved to allow searches for empty/non-empty fields. Support for the PBXT storage engine is added, public query bookmarks, the default browse view's query can be customised

There are a number of major features which also make their debut here. New features include database partitioning, scheduled events, streamable blobs (for videos, etc). I'm looking forward to making use of streaming blobs!

Things that are not improved

The table of contents is even longer. At 13 pages (versus 12 last year), I still feel it's too large. My comment last year was that maybe just the higher level headers should be shown, with more detailed contents at the beginning of each chapter. As an example, under the user management section, there is a header for adding a user. That should be enough. Instead, we then have headers describing the username, the password, the hostname, etc. That sort of thing makes the front of the book very heavy. I feel that most readers when opening the book for the first time wonder to themselves when will the contents end and the content begin.

Most of the screenshots have been redone, but in some cases, shots which were perfectly sized in the old book have been exploded up to larger images in the new one, making them huge relative to the content they portray. For example, on page 78, the top screenshot has a total of about four lines of text in it, but takes up almost two inches of page space (and is pixelated), compared to the original on page 75 of the old book at only one inch. I can see this in a lot of cases in the new book (another is the 3 inch bottom image on 132 vs the perfectly legible 2 inch one in the old book's page 128) and wonder if that helped to add to the number of pages. The new book has 326 pages versus the old book's 318. On the good side, in some cases, the new screenshots reduced the size of the old ones.

I didn't mention it last year, but remember puzzling over it at the time. The last part of the Troubleshooting appendix (chapter 20 back then) discusses future enhancements to phpMyAdmin, but the goals are very vague. "improved support of mysql", "internal code improvements"; these should not be considered goals - they should be considered givens! Besides which, it's not productive to discuss future events that may or may not happen. They're not available yet, so shouldn't be written about in a manual which is about /existing/ work.

Conclusion

I noted a number of improvements, and a number of failures. The improvements outnumber the failures. Each edition of this book gets better and better.

If you are new to phpMyAdmin and are looking for a book, I really do recommend buying this.
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on 22 January 2010
Having some previous experience in programming, but being a newbie to both php and java, I find this book useful. It instructs you in an adequate tempo, introducing relevant techniques as you go along.
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