Customer Reviews


26 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (10)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars eye-opening for me
As a foreigner living, working and studying in the UK in mostly well-to-do circles, my limited one-sided understanding of council estates before reading this book was that, the people living in there were lazy, that they rely on state benefits, watch TV all day and are leeches of the society.

This book has really opened my eyes about the circumstances people...
Published on 7 Dec 2010 by geek in heels

versus
21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the other reviewers suggest
This book doesn't quite work. It seeks to be a personal memoir and an account of public housing policies but falls short in both. For example, while there are references to the author's childhood, these are fleeting and not all that interesting or personal. And, while there is some information on Government housing policy, this is unoriginal and relies too much on a few...
Published on 18 Mar 2008 by Avid


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The story of a life, 22 Mar 2008
By 
Both of the concept of council housing and the author's own. Keenly felt, written with absolute conviction, this is compelling stuff. Lynsey Hanley had clearly been waiting all of her brief life in order to commit this to print. Unmissable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but assumes readers are socialists, 31 Jan 2008
By 
S. A. Richmond (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This was a good book to read, and it gives a great analysis of housing policy and conditions over the past 100 years in Britain. The author uses some good case studies, including the Wood estate which she grew up on near Birmingham.

One word of caution. The author is quite subjective when it comes to putting forward her own view on who could qualify for publically funded housing, and what type of housing this should be. She rightly points out that the main beneficiaries of council housing these days are the "undeserving poor", and I agree that this is unfortunate. However, the author seems to think that a house with a garden is a right of everyone. I'm not so sure about that.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Estates: An Intimate History, 10 Jan 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Thanks to the snow and various other difficulties the UK appears unable to handle, this book has only reached me within the last week. Perfect condition, package undamaged. Thank you seller.

Well worth waiting for! Anyone who has heard Lynsey Hanley on Radio 4 will know how easy to listen to she is - well, she writes in much the same manner.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Potted history of social housing, 18 May 2014
By 
Lendrick (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A declaration of interest first, like Lynsey Hanley I grew up on a council estate, and unlike the author I have actually studied social housing history at college.

Estates for me falls uncomfortably between two stools, it's part popular history, part personal memoir / polemic. If you know little or nothing of the history of social housing in the UK it's probably reasonably informative, though needs treated with caution as this is a very personal take on that history. If you are reasonably familiar with the history you wont get any new information or great insight here.

As a personal memoir it surprising lacking, we get a little about her early years outside Birmingham, but not a lot. For a book dubbed an 'intimate history' what's most noticeably lacking is the voices of the residents of those estates, people for whom Ms Hanley seems to have a curiously ambivalent attitude to.It doesn't help that I found her prose plodding and un-engaging, it's a book that cries out for some photographs and some more inspired presentation of information.

Overall its disappointing if worthy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Narcissistic, greedy and self centred rubbish, 12 Jan 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I want to state bluntly that I HATE what this author represents and the way she has expressed her views is weak.

I bought this book because the premise sounded interesting and living in a block of part buy flats surrounded by council flats I thought the book might open my eyes. The author spends a long time describing the Wood estate she grew up on. This is an interesting insight into the design of estates but she litters her book with her political views.

I work extremely hard earning a well above average wage, but I am not in the position to buy the HOUSE AND GARDEN that she thinks everyone has a right to. I'm sorry but is the author not aware of certain facts of life:
- In cities there is nothing wrong with living in a flat, in London you can buy flats worth millions without a garden that she thinks the government should grant everyone
- Whatever happened to earning your right to property? By either renting at market rates or mortgaging based only on what you can AFFORD.

She is completely deluded and undermines hard working people who scrimp and save to pay rent or buy a place this is within their means when she thinks they should be just dished out by the government.

She criticises the government for building the Wood estate, she asks why the government was so selfish and built a large estate where people didn't have gardens, where each house wasn't personalised and where there weren't pretty rows of corner shops.

Here's the truth to her ignorant attitude: those houses were handed to people for free and helped them escape slums, why should they be given some fairy tale house that the rest of the middle class can't even afford?

Her opinions are disturbing and she has no comprehension of simple economics. Where would that money come? Please could the author point to a map of any town or city to show where each person can have their own plot of land - me thinks she'd quickly run out of space. Absolutely deluded!

Although I disagree with her political views, the main reason I also want to rate the book so low is that it is badly written. There is no structure, it is just one long rant that the author keeps interrupting with apologies that this book is just a rant. Everything is centred around how she feels and how things must happen because of her / for her. Self centred, narcisstic, not good enough I'm afraid.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Estate: An Intimate History, 9 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Can't comment on the whole book as I gave up after a few chapters. If your idea of fun is reading a description of every street and house on a particular estate then go ahead.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Estates: An Intimate History
Estates: An Intimate History by Lynsey Hanley (Paperback - 31 May 2012)
6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews