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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read...
When I finished this novel, I put it down and thought: 'perfect'. Indeed, the story is a sad one; but also humerous, educational and a thoroughly enjoyable read. Jonathan Taylor has achieved a careful balance in his plot, and although he really goes into the nitty gritty of such a cruel and common disease, the book is far from depressing. He develops the plot and...
Published on 19 Sep 2007 by Victoria Rose

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2.0 out of 5 stars Muddled and confused
For me this book never came together. It's not clear to me what the author wanted to say that made him feel justified in exposing his father's most private secrets and frailties.
Published 3 months ago by User201202


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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read..., 19 Sep 2007
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When I finished this novel, I put it down and thought: 'perfect'. Indeed, the story is a sad one; but also humerous, educational and a thoroughly enjoyable read. Jonathan Taylor has achieved a careful balance in his plot, and although he really goes into the nitty gritty of such a cruel and common disease, the book is far from depressing. He develops the plot and characters so as to entwine his reader with them, bringing them into the story - which makes this book a really satisfying read. Despite describing his fathers medical decline, by doing so the author resurrects the memories of what a loving and proud man his father was, and how awful degenerative diseases such as Alzeimers and Parkinsons are.
Unpretentious, amusing and emotional - for anyone that enjoyed John Diamond's 'C: Because Cowards get Cancer too' and Blake Morrisson's 'And When Did You last See your Father?' - this is a must read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars MOVING AND AMUSING, 25 Sep 2007
By 
BYRON (East Midlands) - See all my reviews
This book is beautifully written by a loving son. It is a moving account of the authors life and relationship with his father who started suffering from Parkinsons's disease whilst the author was still a child. Taylor combines amusing anecdotes with his memories in such a smooth and accessible style that sometimes one has to remind oneself that this is a true story. There is no chance of the cardiganisation of JT!!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very witty and poignant, 19 July 2007
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Jonathan Taylor is able to look back on the years spent caring for his ill father with a very witty and humourous retrospective. He tries to find some answers to the questions his father is unable to answer about his past, his family. But it's the way the author is able to paint vivid pictures about holidays with his family and life at home as Parkinson's takes hold of his father enabling you to feel the frustrations and bewildement suffered that really takes hold of the reader in a way that few authors can, and it is for that I have given this the full five stars.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Muddled and confused, 11 April 2014
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For me this book never came together. It's not clear to me what the author wanted to say that made him feel justified in exposing his father's most private secrets and frailties.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Unusual but a good read, 24 Feb 2013
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Makes me want to read his novels. Full of honesty and imagination. A way in for anyone resistant to exploring the issues he raised
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a real and moving memoir- a "must read"., 13 Nov 2008
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This is a moving but unsentimental account of a carer's experiences.Poignant yet humourous at times, this is a memoir which will evoke powerful feelings in readers who have ever looked after or who are looking after a loved one. Yet Taylor's writing has a much wider appeal than this:both Taylor's frustrations and his love for his ailing father are clearly conveyed without mawkishness while the progress of a disease is well documented.The touching moments between father and son who are mostly lost to each other are extremely moving.Taylor's admiration for his father is shown through his tenacious attempts to discover who his father was, truths his father was unable or unwilling to share.
Highly recommended.
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4 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not really any help to anyone with a relative suffering from Parkinsons, 2 Aug 2007
By 
Maureen Robson (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought this book because my 80-year old mother has been suffering from Parkinsons for the past 7 years and I hoped that the book might offer some help, either practical or spiritual, in how to tackle looking after someone with this terrible disease. But I was very disappointed. The story was really about the author's life and history of his family. No doubt this is of interest to him but why would I be interested in his father's sister who lives on the Isle of Man? I want to know about the Parkinsons - after all, this is the main feature of the title of the book. If I'd wanted to read a memoir about the life of someone I'd never heard of I would have bought a different book. But all in all there were probably 2 or 3 pages that offered any insight into the disease, and I read and re-read these few passages greedily. Apart from those, I found the book very disappointing indeed.
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Take Me Home: Parkinson's, My Father, Myself
Take Me Home: Parkinson's, My Father, Myself by Jonathan Taylor (Paperback - 4 Aug 2008)
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