Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rational argument against 'peak oil'
This book makes a good case against fears of an imminent decline in global oil output ('peak oil'). In contradiction to what some reviewers here state, Clarke does know what he is talking about, since he has been consulting to the oil business for many years. He presents a view based on long and deep experience of the petroleum industry, and his book therefore serves as a...
Published on 18 Mar 2008 by Robin Mills

versus
50 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Transparent obfuscation
A few good things can be said about this book:

1)Its a good study guide for those wishing to understand the different methods used to attempt to undermine arguments when you have very little rationale points to offer.
2)For those with even the least bit of knowledge about Peak Oil theory this book will show them that the arguements against Peak Oil are...
Published on 21 Feb 2007 by Chris Newman


Most Helpful First | Newest First

50 of 52 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Transparent obfuscation, 21 Feb 2007
By 
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
A few good things can be said about this book:

1)Its a good study guide for those wishing to understand the different methods used to attempt to undermine arguments when you have very little rationale points to offer.
2)For those with even the least bit of knowledge about Peak Oil theory this book will show them that the arguements against Peak Oil are extremely thin.

Some of the 'argument' styles used throughout the book include:

1)Use of perjorative and ridiculing language throughout the book when discussing peak oil and its theorists
2)Straw man arguments - concentrating on the extreme views or quotes expressed by individuals rather than the mainstream
3)Falsly claiming to have already dealt with certain points when actually they have not
4)Contradictory arguments - e.g. claiming that peak oil theories are immutable and then attacking them for flexing dates
5)Severe lack of references when quoting estimates
6)Avoidance - lack of discussion on both EROEI (Energy Return on Energy Invested), lack of discussion on Chris Skrebowski's mega project analysis, whilst claiming all Peak Oil theorist follow the Hubbert Model.
7)A priori or circular arguments - e.g. Clarke believes more oil exists than Peak Oil theory does and then criticises Peak Oil for not recognising that more oil exists.
8) Plain ridiculous - e.g. saying that Peak Oil theorist cannot be believed until they do a field by field analysis - when they have been crying out for field by field data for years. Claiming that because they don't account for all variable (including future political events!) the theory in fundamentally flawed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Being Kind with this Rating, 4 April 2007
By 
J. Mayer (Aberystwyth) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
Okay, the reason that I bought this book is that I am a mature well rounded fellow who appreciates counter arguments and I felt that Peak Oil was so frightening in its implications that it required balancing.

I found this book UNREADABLE and I still haven't read it cover to cover and am not sure whether I will or not. Peak Oil writers are at least articulate and all the main books on the subject can be picked up - opened at any page - and then devoured at leisure. This one can't be.

The subject is crying out for a heavy hitter to articulate the counter arguments to the masses like myself - I emphasize the word 'articulate'. This book just does not do the job and has pushed me even more firmly towards the Peak Oilers
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Utter nonsense, 15 April 2007
By 
Richard A. Kerver "Arkmundi" (Worcester, MA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
Colin Campbell, a real geophysicist, who therefore understands the finite capacity we have of producing marketable flow, once described the "controversy" over peak oil as being between the geologists and economists. That's realist versus idealist. Please understand that Duncan Clarke is the latter - an economists. But of the worst sort, someone with the wherewithal to spread deceit as just another economic hit man. Such men live in a fantasy world where human ingenuity is supposedly able to overcome any practical limits of reality, whether those limits are geological constraints, workers, or human conscience. Those with fortunes to protect, based on the London and New York merchantile exchanges, the house of cards built with petrodollar recycling and its many derivatives, are now in stark raving fear mode. Such economists would have us believe in schemes of continued investment in all that petroleum and natural gas infrastructure. After all, there really are fortunes to protect. The immanent collapse of the growth economy, and all that serves, is indeed fearsome. Investors have shown quite the propensity to panic in the markets, and must not let that happen, now should we? Better to keep the dream alive, huh? To concoct fantasies of ever more available petroleum reserves and to dismiss the half century of sound geological science on which modern predictions of an immanent peak in world productive capacity are based, is dangerous to the extreme. Like the pied piper of old, Duncan would lead us where we must not go. Don't bother reading the book, if it is even readable. Stay focused in reality, and please make wise investment choices, of which there are many to choose.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't buy this book, 17 Sep 2007
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
I am very tired of non experts writing books that require expert knowledge. Poets write about things they do not know anything about. Do not buy this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rational argument against 'peak oil', 18 Mar 2008
By 
Robin Mills - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
This book makes a good case against fears of an imminent decline in global oil output ('peak oil'). In contradiction to what some reviewers here state, Clarke does know what he is talking about, since he has been consulting to the oil business for many years. He presents a view based on long and deep experience of the petroleum industry, and his book therefore serves as a counterbalance to many ill-informed proponents of 'peak oil'. He points out the complex interplay of geology, economics, technology and politics in the modern oil world, and the many corporate and state players, which make it impossible to reduce the world oil future to a few simple parameters. There are few, if any, books making this case, which gives this text particular importance.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A challenge to conventional wisdom, 10 Mar 2007
This review is from: The Battle For Barrels: Peak Oil Myths and World Oil Futures: Peak Oil Myths & World Oil Futures (Hardcover)
I guess this book is bound to upset some people There seems to be a widespread, deep-seated, need to believe in imminent catastrophe. But one can hardly blame the author for hitting targets that make themselves so easily available. After all, how many times can so-called expert make erroneous forecasts before one begins to question the methods and theories that underlie them?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews