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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Second outing for Sergeant Frost
The character of Inspector 'Jack' Frost was created by the successful radio dramatist R D (Rodney) Wingfield, who died in 2007. The first Frost novel - 'Frost at Christmas' - was written in the early 1970s, but was rejected by the commissioning publisher. It was eventually published in Canada in 1984, but didn't appear in Britain until 1989. Five more novels followed: A...
Published 23 months ago by Stanwegian

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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting
Detective Sergeant Frost is before his promotion coming to grips with his wife's illness and Mullett's early years as his boss. Good for a holiday read - not too taxing
Published 2 months ago by Emma Price


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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Second outing for Sergeant Frost, 17 May 2012
By 
Stanwegian (Tyneside, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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The character of Inspector 'Jack' Frost was created by the successful radio dramatist R D (Rodney) Wingfield, who died in 2007. The first Frost novel - 'Frost at Christmas' - was written in the early 1970s, but was rejected by the commissioning publisher. It was eventually published in Canada in 1984, but didn't appear in Britain until 1989. Five more novels followed: A Touch of Frost (produced as a radio play in 1987 and published as a novel in 1990), Night Frost (1992), Hard Frost (1995), Winter Frost (1999) and A Killing Frost (published posthumously in 2008). David Jason was an early fan of the novels and was largely responsible for bringing Frost to television in 1992, as a vehicle for his move towards more serious and dramatic roles in his illustrious acting career.

'What's all this got to do with the new novel?' I hear you quite reasonably ask. Well, quite a bit, actually, so please bear with me for another paragraph. To appeal to a primetime TV audience, Frost's character was softened considerably. The TV Frost was not the Frost of the books, though both were excellent in their way. Wingfield's Frost had a gritty realism, and the books reflected the dark and macabre humour which provides a safety valve from the stresses of what can often be a deeply unpleasant job. Wingfield claimed to have watched only one episode of 'A Touch of Frost', saying that while he had nothing against David Jason as an actor 'he just isn't my Frost'. And that's the point - there are two significantly different Frosts, and the Frost of the books is a substantially darker and more complex character.

After Wingfield's death in 2007, the executors of his estate commissioned James Gurbutt and Henry Sutton (hence the nom-de-plume 'James Henry') to produce a further Frost novel, and this appeared as 'First Frost' in 2011. Wisely, this didn't simply follow on from Wingfield's last novel; it was a prequel, set in 1981, when Frost was a Sergeant and Superintendent Mullet was just settling in to his new post at Denton. It was, in my view, a five-star crime novel, capturing Wingfield's style of writing with almost uncanny accuracy, and fully matching the bleak and gritty standard of Wingfield's own novels.

'Fatal Frost' is a second prequel, set in the early summer of 1982. Denton is chronically understaffed, and is struggling to cope with a spate of burglaries and to pacify the affronted residents of a block of flats overlooking the rear of Denton's newly-opened massage parlour. An elderly local walking his dog in Denton Woods discovers the body of a 15-year-girl near the foot of a railway embankment, and before the investigation into this death is properly under way, the body of another 15-year-old is found on a green at Denton's newly extended golf club, during the re-opening celebrations attended (of course!) by Superintendent Mullet. This time, however, the body is naked, male, missing several of its organs and arranged in a form suggesting a pentagram. Once again, the writing (this time by James Gurbutt alone) is pure Wingfield; the dark humour crackles and in the usual Frost style the strands of the various enquiries intersect and overlap without appearing to reveal any discernible pattern.

THe novel has all of the classic ingredients of the series, and is a rollocking good read, well worth the extremely low price asked by Amazon at the time of publication. But .... in restrospect, it wasn't completely satisfying. Having thought about my reaction for a couple of days, I've come to the conclusion that the plotting isn't quite up to scratch. This isn't a spoiler - the solution is as well obscured by red herrings as you would expect - but when you reach the end you're left wondering why anyone would commit a premeditated murder in circumstances which generate such an extremely high risk of discovery. Perhaps you won't agree, but even if you do I don't think you'll regret your purchase. I feel guilty for offering only four stars, but that's the way I feel - though it doesn't stop me from eagerly awaiting the next book in the series!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frost Reinstated, 9 Jun 2012
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Having read all of R.D. Wingfields Frost novels, I really wasn't sure that this could measure up to the original standard of Wingfield, but how wrong was I - this still made me chuckle in all the right places, as Frost got up to his old antics with Mullet etc. The storyline was good, and in true Frost style, he had 2 or 3 murders pending, which he dealt with in his own chaotic style! It was great.

James Henry has definitely captured R.D. Wingfields style, making this a real page turner from start to finish. I certainly look forward to reading more from this author whether it be another Frost novel or a novel of his own making. Well done that man....
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A blast from the past, 26 May 2012
By 
EMLYN REES (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Excellently plotted, with a thrilling climax, this is a cracker of a read. There's plenty to enjoy here. First and foremost is the young Frost himself. Being the kind of cop who's more interested in justice than the law, and rates results over bureaucracy, he's a character you warm to right away. He's every bit as canny as you'd expect from the Wingfield books and TV shows, but in this outing he's also armed with the kind of one liners Elmore Leonard would be proud of. He's brilliantly flawed. The first time we meet him, he's fiddling his expenses. And, throughout the book, he's brilliantly inept when it comes to dealing with the needs of the women in his life. As a result, he feels refreshingly real. Which is just as well, because there's plenty of harsh reality in this novel too. A gruesome series of apparently disconnected murders. Racism within the police force. Nothing's shied away from here. The icing on the cake, though, is that, as well as this being a deeply satisfying crime novel, it's also a cracking trip back to the 80's. The author doesn't overdo the nostalgia, but it all adds to the ride. I missed the decade as well as young Frost the second I turned the last page.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good author., 15 Feb 2013
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A very good read. Better then the t v series. As good as R.D. Wingfield. I would recommend to anyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fatal Frost by James Henry, 28 Jan 2013
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Fatal Frost The book is very good reading, I had to double check that it was not wrote by R D Wingfield

J Craine
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FATAL FROST, 8 Jan 2013
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ALTHOUGH THIS IS BY A DIFFERENT AUTHOR TO THE ORIGINAL FROSTS IT IS BRILLIANT AND FOLLOWS THE ORIGINAL CHARACTERS TO THE LETTER. I WOULD NOT HAVE BELIEVED IT WAS BY SOMEONE OTHER THAN WINGFIELD
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Early Frost, 24 Dec 2012
By 
AJ (Norwich, Norfolk) - See all my reviews
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Both of James Henry's 'Frost' books stay true to the character of the originals and are written in the same 'shotgun' style. Hopefully there will be more to come.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Icy Return?, 27 Jun 2012
By 
Jo D'Arcy (Portsmouth, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
It is 1982, the world is focussing on events happening on islands at the bottom of the South Atlantic. But in Denton, the locals are focussing on something much closer to home, a murder. A young girl is found in woodland near a railway track. A first glance suicide?

Then whilst enjoying a round of golf at the new refurbished club house and course Superintendent Mullet is called to something at the ninth hole - a body, this time a young boy, positioned in a particular and peculiar way.

Detective Sergeant 'Jack' Frost and his colleagues are busy working on a spate of burglaries which happen to be rife in Denton. Resources are split thinner when these bodies appear and the hunt is now on for the killer.

With officers off sick, and on courses for new fangled computer equipment and the introduction of the area's first 'black' officer, tensions are running high. This is a CID which thinks nothing of a few pints at lunchtime and going back to work. Of smoking in offices, and using rather heavy handed tactics with suspects. This is very much a police force of the 1980s, one that lives up to stereotypes but has no doubt a large element of truth within in. The author captures it very well.

Personal lives of these officers seem to take a back seat, and when they try and reach out for something other than work, they find it has already gone. Work is their saviour especially in the case of DS Frost.

When the dead boy's sister goes missing, personal lives don't exist as time is now running out to solve this murder and link them if there is a link. But for Frost and his colleagues they need to juggle the burglaries and the rather dubious massage parlour which is under the spotlight. Superintendent Mullet wants answers to everything and now.

Can Frost make sense of this jumble and get a result? Only by reading the book will you inevitably find out.

And yes, if you think the name is familiar it is the same Frost that David Jason plays on the television. This is set before Frost became an inspector. You can obviously see the dislike Superintendent Mullet has of Frost and more than likely the way he conducts his investigations and his lack of paperwork. I am sure Frost made Inspector on his policing and not his paper pushing.

This is the second book in a prequel to R.D.Wingfield's original Frost novel and you have no need to have read these or the first, the book stands alone very well on its own.
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1.0 out of 5 stars A POOR IMITATION!, 2 April 2014
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This review is from: Fatal Frost: DI Jack Frost series 2 (Audio CD)
Lovers of R D Wingfield's work beware! This a television version of our beloved Jack Frost with none of the laugh out loud characterisations and clever entwining of different story lines. A very poor script.. Go back to the originals - there's where you'll find classic treatments of plot and principal characterers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars excellent stories, 9 Mar 2014
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Can definitely link the characters to the tv series,and can just imagine jack winding mullet up the way he does on tv
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Fatal Frost: DI Jack Frost series 2
Fatal Frost: DI Jack Frost series 2 by James Henry (Audio CD - 10 May 2012)
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