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54 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars forerunner of the da vinci code
Whether you believe the premise of the book or not(and I don't),it's a fantastic read. I hope this new edition sells well after being mentioned in Dan Brown's bestselling Da Vinci Code.
More facts have come out about the truth(or lack of it) about the secret society supposedly protecting an earth shattering secret,but I still recommend buying the book because it's...
Published on 24 Aug 2005 by Amazon Customer

versus
48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining nonsense
To an extent. Some of what is contained in this book is documented historical fact, and as a professional historian, I'm always delighted when material is presented in a fashion that interests a wider audience. I view this sort of thing as the written equivalent of a cinematic 'historical' epic. Is is particularly accurate? No. But it doesn't pretend to be either -the...
Published on 22 May 2006 by S. Lindgren


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Controversial to say the Least, 12 Sep 2006
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This book has recently gained a huge amount of publicity with the court case between the authors and the author of the Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown. I purchased the book on the back of that wave of publicity and having now read both books cannot really see what the court case was all about. The books could not be more different.[...] Most of the books written today contain regurgitated information from other books, either factual or fiction.

This book has a basis in fact, although much of it may be the vivid imagination of the authors. To be honest I don't know the answer. The book is both controversial, shocking and deeply moving. It is interesting and thought provoking. Whether you believe the conclusions that the authors come to, is a different matter and one for the individual. Perhaps the authors findings are as plausible an account of the life and times of Jesus as the one generally recognised by the church as true. It is a matter of the individuals faith. It is very difficult, if not impossible to prove anything either way.

I enjoyed reading the book, that is not to say that I agreed with its findings.
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54 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Book, Let the Reader Decide: Fact vs Fiction, 25 July 2004
By 
Anyone who read "The Da Vinci Code" by Dan Brown would benefit from reading this unusual book that researches the themes and topics which made "Da Vinci Code" such a hot best-seller ...
The Knights Templar and their secret ceremonies, the "Rose Croix", i.e., the "Rosicrusican organiztion", "the Priere de Sion" who are believed to be behind the activities of these "fighters for justice", the Cathars, Secrets from Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem, the list of Grand Masters, secret parchments and headstones of graves with encrypted messages, possible information about the origins of Christianity and what really happened during and after the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ, actions taken by the Catholic Church in the early years and during its delineation of religious doctrine --- can anyone unravel the mysteries and secrets contained within? Knowing that these organizations and secrets have remained *exactly* *that*, "secret" for about 2,000 years or likely much longer ... dating back from ancient Egypt -- the intrigue and allure of the possible revelations ... contained within this book just grow more mysterious and enticing ...
This book begins with a mystery of its own, it grabs the readers attention and is the hook that keeps you hanging in there. At times, "hanging" is the operative word because the long list of names and places which are needed to provide authenticaiton become tedious reading indeed. Through no fault of the authors, there is a great deal of detail, these details add up to repeatable research for anyone who has the time and inclination to delve further into the subject for themselves. First, the "hook" --- the story of Berenger Sauniere, a parish priest from a tiny village in Rennes-le-Chateau discovers parchments, old documents, and mysterious headstones during the renovation of the old church. The documents are passed on to the local Bishop who passes them up the hierarchy of the Catholic Church, some of whom meet with Sauniere. After this point the priest begins to show signs of wealth and starts living a more lavish life-style, also consorts with people who have esoteric knowledge and interests. After his sudden death from a stroke, an odd death cermony occured where the priest was seated in an unusual garb, a robe with tassles, and unidentified mourners who attended, plucked a tassle off the robe as they bid hin adieu into the next world ... Sauniere's housekeeper received some knowledge of a "secret" which she was going to confide, but she too died before it was revealed. After their deaths, many questions arose pertaining to their odd activiites, the discovered encrypted messages, and the source of their wealth -- the belief was that they discovered "hidden treasure" which was taken by the Knights Templars from the Temple in Jerusalem during the Crusades. Yet, there was more than this to consider, what messages were disguised by encrption? These authors have been researching this subject for over 30 years. In 1972, when the authors made their first film, it was about the basic story as described above about the parish priest in France and the mysterious discovery he made, as well as the unusual activities he engaged in ... After it was shown on British television, they received a huge deluge of correspondence -- one of from a retired Anglican priest, had the oddest but most preposterous claim of all, that it was *not* gold or jewels which was the treasure of the Knights Templar, but "incontrovertible proof" that Jesus survived the Crucifixion ... that it was a fraud. The authors turned their quest in another direction --- researching another claim, that Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene, and they had children. They examined the legend which states Mary Magdalene and her children by Jesus arrived in France, sometime after the Crucifixion ... and are related by blood to the old Merovingian dynasty, who became kings and queens in France. Therefore, the quest for the "Holy Grail" is not a physical item, such as the cup from which Christ drank but is instead, the quest for the "san greal", "sang royal" ... that is "royal blood". Jesus having descended from King David of ancient Israel, is of royal blood. The final and last secret is that there are today blood relatives living who are related to Jesus in France ... of course, this claim is based on a lot of "ifs".
I enjoyed this book for the many questions it raised and the many avenues of research the authors took to arrive at information. They name names, the provide a list of genealogical dynasties, they provide information about places, temples, monuments,gravestones, mysterious paintings and messages contained within them -- which can all be examined. One reason this book is so fascinating is the assertion and conclusions the authors arrive at --- is not "cut and dry", "black and white", since there is no solid and authentic document that can be dated and with total certainty to "prove" the authors assertions. The many "if this then that" explantions they provide leaves room for healty scepticism, as well as the remote possibility they hae stumbled onto the greatest "hoax" of all time. I highly recommend this book for anyone who has an open mind, is interested in a good mystery and can look at alternative explanations, that also require some stretch of "faith" but not of a religous variety. Erika Borsos (bakonyvilla)
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real life-changing read!!!!!, 20 Oct 2000
By A Customer
Whilst staying at a friend apartment in Tenerife, I ran out of books...and I still had a week to go. I scanned the book case in the lounge, and, in between various Mills & Boon's and Jackie Collins', I found this intriguing looking book. I then read it cover to cover in two days...and barely slept! The reader is slowly pulled in to this evolving mystery - and, when the 'truth' is revealed, one is still forced into reading on. An amazing book. Read the "If you liked this.." books as well - they only add to the intrigue.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing., 14 Sep 2004
The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail started out as a very interesting read. The first half of the book is filled with a historical background that takes you through time in a riveting way and sets you up for what you hope is a big revelation. However, when the revelation comes it just leaves you wondering if someone switched books on you. I was very disappointed to see that the biggest part of the book is filled with assumptions; assumptions which the authors use to draw their conclusions from. It basically reads like one big what if. Very disappointing.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Holy Mackerel!, 25 Sep 2006
It will come as no surprise to many to find out that I read this book immediately after DVC in a pursuit to find out what it really is all about.

I would heartily recommend this book as a companion piece to aforementioned da Vinci Code but as I say with that book, you must retain an open mind. I am reasonably convinced about large parts of this story, but in my opinion too many assumptions are made by the authors in order to make the story fit their own conclusion, as opposed to the other way around.

Certainly a good, factual (!?) piece, but you may find that it will not satisfy you, thus leading you down the "grail trail" to read more...
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars bestea Neptunis Quintosaurus similis?, 15 Jun 2000
By 
D. De Gruijter (Leiden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Let's face it: this book is quite a bold - but at this time already nearly dated - enterprise into the shady realm of forged history, or misunderstood history. As the authors themselves a number of times attest, their book is founded mainly on speculation and hypothesis to fit the pieces of the puzzles together. But it's one of the most believable thesises yet. Although there are certain points where my skeptical eye just couldn't digest the theories, the main structure of this work remains unaffected. I believe part III - about the 'real' life of Jesus - of the book is the strongest contender for the forged history theory. And we all know that in the Vatican, forgery is the name of the game. It quite baffles my scholarly brain how people can still confess the Christian faith while they are bombarded with cold neutral facts about the many deceptions, documents, intruiges etc. that are fluttering around between these covers. Something was going on in the struggling young Church, and it wasn't healthy. The conclusion quite baffled me, if not struck me as peculiar. Until then we are confronted by a secret organization with a scheme that may have lasted for 2000 years to put to effect with quite a negative connotation to it. At the end of the conclusion, however, the authors almost seem to welcome (tongue-in-cheek) the coming of a Merovingan dynasty by handling the Priority of Sion with extremely gentle gloves. Personally, I'd think a form of intellectual aristocracy or elite is just what our old fattened world needs at this moment to build a firm foundation for the distant future of mankind. It seems that the Priority thinks so to. One thing I found irritating is the lacking of annotations. There's a slim way to find out what quotation or view came out of what book in the big list at the end of the work. Sometimes a statement just slaps you out of the blue in to the face and you'd like to know if it's speculation and if so how founded it is. One more thing. Since this book has attained bestseller status and is thus quite accepted in its level of 'outrageousness', I think it's important to turn our eyes back upon 'The Witch Cult in Western Europe' and 'The God of the Witches' by Margaret A. Murray. Re-reading those works might reveal some (minor?) connections to the events portrayed in 'The Holy Blood & the Holy Grail'.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Tired, 31 Dec 2006
I intially read The Templar Revelation shortly after it's publication and found it quite interesting, even if I felt the authors had left an air of confusion at the end and almost indicated that some of the secret groups in history were working in mans interest secreting and guarding some secret knowledge from the goverments of the world for the future of mankind- which left myself as a reader a little miffed- as secrecy never benefits mankind and unless you know the key you are never going to unlock the door- thus secret language is only beneficial to the intiated. This book was pre-Teamplar revelation, though I read it post and found it to be much of the same and a little less. Both books serve as great introductions to the subject- giving the new reader an insightful look at the anomalies in history, archaeology, art & theology- opening a whole new door and taking the reader into the labyrinth. However, these authors have someone managed to miss a vast amount of material on the subjects of religion, mythology, history which is core to the subject and subsequently leave their readers stuck in the labyrinth with lots of interesting facts which lead only to opinions. I would, as I have recommended before reading R.Henry's 'Theatre Earth- Who Pulls the Strings'. If you have no background knowledge then 'Holy Blood...' et a; are a good place to start- but please move on to better books and leave these two-a-penny paperbacks to novices.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't Live Up To The Hype, 31 July 2006
After the spectacular success of The Da Vinci Code (excluding the movie)I have to say I was expecting more from this book. If you're looking for a more in depth explanation of the theory put forward in the fictional Dan Brown bestseller, then to some extent this provides it. However, the reader may get bogged down by the extensive ins and outs of what seems like the entire history of France. The Bible gets only a fraction of the attention paid to France and the family lineages, which is frustrating considering their sensationalist conclusions. I would have liked a little less monotony as some of the chapters and sub-sections (despite their interesting titles) seem to be much the same thing over and over again. Perhaps in time the authors will be able to base their claims, entertaining though they most deffinately are, on a more solid framework. I so wanted to believe this, and in a way I did get sucked in, but I would have liked a little more to go on to truly convert me to their way of thiking. As it stands it reads like a losely threaded together novel, lacking that extra blow that would really set it apart. I also found it hard going in places, and it took me far longer to read than other books, as I really had to force myself to pick it up sometimes. Deffinately not one for the casual reader, you really have to be patient with this one!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holy Blood, Holy Grail, 10 Aug 2006
The book makes some very interesting speculations about Jesus, for example that he might have been married and had children, and that he was a political figure who staged the crucifiction as an elaborate hoax in order to fulfil old testament prophecies. This may offend some Christian readers, but to non-Christians, it would seem no less plausible than the popular version of the story.

It's all pretty much pure speculation, but it's thought provoking nontheless. Part of their evidence is based around the "Priory of Sion", which has since been revealed to be a hoax, and there is a bit too much focus on this and the mystery of Rennes le Chateau. The meat of the book is in the parts about Jesus. Two thousand years later, of course, it's very diffucult to tell which of the theories are true and which aren't, but it should remind us to try to regard history from different points of view and not automatically assume the mainstream version - which is usually as told by the "winners" - to be true.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 8 Oct 2011
By 
T. J. Walton "Tim Walton" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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Regardless of one's opinion, facts cannot be argued with, and this book is a vast catalogue of facts and well researched history. All of which are seemingly linked or merely implausible coincidence on an unimaginable scale. No silly tales about sky faerie magic, but feet on the ground journalism. Not written to bolster a preordained theory, the authors followed the facts sequentially and were led to an amazing conclusion. The truth is better than fiction.
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