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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thor. Still Mighty.
There may be spoilers ahead...

Imagine what life would be like for those who prayed to their Gods but had no Gods to pray to. A mystery unravels for Thor as he discovers that deities all across the cosmos are being wiped out summarily, but as he plays detective, he becomes at risk himself as an ungodly being from his distant past resurfaces and threatens not...
Published 19 months ago by Culleton

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2.0 out of 5 stars Thor Bores
Jason Aaron + Thor = Sure Thing, right? Well... no. Jason Aaron is definitely one of my favourite comics writers due to penning the superb Scalped and the ongoing Marvel series Wolverine and the X-Men, but his more recent stuff like Thanos Rising and this Thor series have felt really lacking in the quality he usually brings to his projects. Maybe he's stretched, or just...
Published 19 months ago by Sam Quixote


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thor. Still Mighty., 6 Aug. 2013
By 
Culleton (Winchester, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
There may be spoilers ahead...

Imagine what life would be like for those who prayed to their Gods but had no Gods to pray to. A mystery unravels for Thor as he discovers that deities all across the cosmos are being wiped out summarily, but as he plays detective, he becomes at risk himself as an ungodly being from his distant past resurfaces and threatens not only himself, but the whole of Asgardia and even every God on every world. Everywhere.

After Matt Fraction's brilliant and amazing run (there aren't enough superlatives for me to express how much I loved Fraction's reign at the helm of The Mighty Thor), which ended with Mighty Thor, The: Everything Burns, Marvel revamped the title with Thor: God of Thunder under a new team.

Jason Aaron (author) and Esad Ribic (artist) are not familiar names to me so I was sceptical at first when issue 1 of T:GOT landed on my doormat. Luckily, I'm open to change so whilst I had this notion that it won't be as good as the Fraction era, I was still quite open minded and hoped that I wouldn't be disappointed.

I wasn't.

Yes it's a completely new direction. There's no Loki, no Broxton, no Warriors Three, no Jane Foster, no Avengers (apart from a cameo by Iron Man briefly), no familiar names at all. But I like it so far. And there's not just Thor, but three Thors!

Three for the price of one.

As the Odinson's mystery unravels, we see the story connect from three stages of Thor's past, present and future. It begins in Iceland in the 9th century (this is Thor pre-Mjolnir), it jumps to the present with Thor the Avenger, protector of Midgard and we also see the distant future as the ancient and weary Thor King of Asgard battles the legions of the villain that has tortured him for so long.

And the name of this villain? Gorr, the God Butcher. A being of great power that has so much hatred for the Gods that he's spent eons wiping them out across the cosmos.

Thor must use the combined power and might of his past, present and future selves to defeat the God Butcher, where no God has ever succeeded before.

This is a great story, despite the different direction that I was so dreading, and definitely my favourite of all the revamped Marvel NOW! titles. Ribic's artwork is stunning - I'm an instant fan of both it and the entire tale. It ends on a cliffhanger so volume 2 will continue where this one left off in Thor God of Thunder: Godbomb.

Enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A superb opening to this new series, 31 July 2013
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
This is a superb opening to the new series of Thor comics, which runs through issues #1-5 of Thor God of Thunder, and is collected as Thor: God of Thunder. It opens in Iceland in the 9th century, where we meet the young Thor on a mission to answer the prayers of a Viking village who have had a visitation from a Frost Giant. Armed with his Asgardian weapon, the mighty axe Jarnbjorn, he soon sees it off, or at least its head. However, during the celebration feast, a body washes up, from the land to the west, which Thor recognises as a dead god, a god that has been butchered (in the Hannibal Lecter sense of the word) by an unknown power. Later, in the ‘present’, Thor hears a prayer from an alien race and comes to answer it, discovering that the alien’s pantheon have been butchered, and he recognises the handiwork of Gorr the God Butcher, who he thought long dead. Then, ‘many millennia from now’ we see Thor, the last god of Asgard, sitting in his hall, under attack from the forces of Gorr, the God Butcher, who has killed off all the rest of the Asgardians…

So, we begin in the past with a mysterious force, discover it at work again in the present, though we now know its name and that Thor has dealt with it before, and we see that force’s final triumph in the far future. During the course of this story, we get to see the young Thor’s relationship with the Vikings in the days before he was found worthy to lift the hammer Mjolnir, we see the ‘righteous’ Thor of ‘now’, and we meet the aged Thor of the future, who bears a striking resemblance to his father Odin, apart from the missing limb, of course, for whom even the ‘now’ Thor mistakes his future self, when he pursues the God Butcher to the end of time.

The present Thor, after discovering the butchered pantheon, visits Omnipotence City, ‘nexus of all the gods’, built “twelve billion years ago” from “the rubble of the rock of creation and embers from the fire that lit the first stars” to consult its library. The Librarian remembers the boy Thor from his first visit, “along with that equally charming brother of yours”. Accompanied by much sarcasm, the Librarian shows Thor the Hall of the Lost, where the register of ‘inactive’ gods is kept. Thor does a bit of research and goes off to look for these gods, to find only bodies. This quest is skilfully interspersed with his adventures with the Vikings, and his first encounter with the God Butcher in the 9th century, along with the final siege of Asgard in the far future. In the present, he returns to the scene of his original encounter with the God Butcher, and we see that he has learned some humility since the 9th century. He discovers a refugee god hiding there, who reveals some stuff to us, which sends Thor back to Omnipotence City to do some more research, only to find the library has been attacked by the God Butcher. Thor eventually tracks him to the secret world of Chronux, where the gods of time travel have fallen victim to the Butcher, who has now travelled to the end of time to attack Asgard, apparently in revenge for what happened to him in the 9th century. Thor naturally follows him, and is just in time to make a last stand with his future self…

I was wondering how Jason Aaron was going to follow Fraction and Gillen’s superb series, and wasn’t expecting much from this story. Imagine my surprise then, when I found myself hooked from the very beginning of this superb story, which doesn’t ‘follow’ the previous series at all – it goes flying off in a completely new and different direction. I really must have more faith in these writers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thunderstruck by the awesomeness, 8 July 2013
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As a long time Marvel fan since mid 90's I have read my share of comics mostly the likes of Deadpool, Spider-Man, Ghost Rider etc as they have become my favorites. However im a big fan of fantasy so after seeing the movie thor it made me realise i have never read a Thor comic so i started reading a few older tales from 90's etc. But then came across this .... this blew me away and had me gripped the whole way through never has Thor's world seemed so threatened, a gripping story and beautiful artwork as well as one hell of a menacing villian in Gorr who is even creepy at times and one of the best villians in the marvel universe in my opinion. If your at all intrested in Thor Comics get this its amazing and i cannot wait for next volume, i hope this high standard will stay throught out the series, Thor God Of Thunder has a new big fan in me.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best Thor has been since Simonson, 14 July 2013
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This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
This has been one of the better titles Marvel have put out recently.

The plot centers around a particularly nasty serial-killer who's victims all happen to be gods, and the action takes place at three different times in Thor's life when he encounters this being. This means that you've effectively got three protagonists: Young Thor, who's over-confident and up-beat; Thor the Avenger, who is the Thor contemporary with the current Marvel timeline and is the more thoughtful one playing detective; and finally Old Thor, who is cynical and damaged by events the other two have yet to experience.

It's a good plot - interesting, exciting, and above all, epic. It doesn't have any of Thor's supporting cast like the Warrior's Three, Loki, or Sif, it's just Thor, Thor, Thor...that means no romantic subplots, or indeed any sub-plots really, as you are jumping between the three Thors. Iron Man turns up for a page or two, but that's it as far as Avengers cameos.

Other things worth noting for potential buyers:

The art is by Esad Ribic throughout the entire book, and it is beautifully coloured by Dean White and Ive Svorcina. This means the entire book looks great from start to finish with no irritating changes in art-team to pull you out of the story. One of the best-looking books Marvel have put out in a while.

The story requires no knowledge of Marvel's Thor to enjoy - there are no references to past Marvel events, no crossovers with other comics, no need to have read any Marvel comic before to understand what's going on in this story. Basically this is new-reader-friendly.

This book is the first-half of a story that will conclude in the next Thor graphic novel "Thor God of Thunder: Godbomb", and consequently ends on something of a cliffhanger. So forewarned is forearmed, as they say.

Overall I think this is a great book and a must-have for Thor fans.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Thor Bores, 16 July 2013
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
Jason Aaron + Thor = Sure Thing, right? Well... no. Jason Aaron is definitely one of my favourite comics writers due to penning the superb Scalped and the ongoing Marvel series Wolverine and the X-Men, but his more recent stuff like Thanos Rising and this Thor series have felt really lacking in the quality he usually brings to his projects. Maybe he's stretched, or just uninspired, but I didn't enjoy this very poor effort.

Aaron shows Thor at three different points in his long life - as a young man, living amongst Vikings in the 9th century; as he is in our time, an Avenger; and in the future, where he resembles his dad with one eye, has one arm, and looks old and worn out. Gorr the God Butcher has been, well, butchering gods for millennia but kept Thor alive until the last as he is the only one who stood up to him. Why is he slaughtering gods? He doesn't quite like them. Doesn't like their attitudes or the way they comport themselves, so they've gotta die. That's basically it for character motivation.

So this entire book is Thor, at various points in his life, seeing the effects of Gorr's work, looking at the slaughtered gods and swearing to hunt him down. Gorr meanwhile continues killing gods. Gorr and Thor sometimes cross paths and fight - no one dies or seems to be majorly hurt, despite limbs being hacked off. More gods die. There's a giant lake of god blood. The story is to be continued. The end. Very unsatisfying!

The story is very weak and repetitive and the characters barely interesting. Thor is an ok character but I feel he's still a bit one-dimensional - despite the various stages in his life, he remains brash and overconfident only with varying levels of both. Gorr on the other hand remains boringly powerful. There isn't an obstacle in his path that causes him a hindrance - he can overcome them all without any sign of effort. He can create armies of powerful beings out of nothing, he can morph his body into powerful weapons (his arm turns into an unbreakable black sword), he can regrow limbs, he can travel through time, he can do whatever, whenever, however. Is there anything more pointless than an invincible bad guy? What's more annoying is that he's bound to fall in the second book in some contrived way ("No, not my Achilles heel which you just discovered in Volume 2!"). His character design and invincibility reminded me a lot of Super Buu from Dragon Ball who's another alien god-like creature who can't be beaten - so even though he's not much of a character, it looks like Aaron's lifted him from an older Japanese comic rather than bothering to create someone original.

I've always known Thor is a god but it wasn't until I read this book and the god characters show up in their scores that I really questioned gods in Marvel. Though I'm non-religious, a god to me should be more abstract and intangible than simply a human or alien with superpowers, and even then only some of them seem to have them! In this book, gods are basically replicas of humans or aliens and live on orbiting moons - it just seems too literal an interpretation. It also makes them seem less than gods and more like the rest of us whom we've wrongly assigned the label gods - in which case, they really aren't gods at all. Which is fine, maybe that was Aaron's intention - I get the impression he's non-religious too - but it makes the story that much less impressive. The God Butcher is really just an unkillable, angry alien who hates beings whom less powerful beings call gods - a Butcher instead. The story becomes far less dramatic and much more mundane.

I'm also not a fan of Esad Ribic's art. It's not terrible but somehow the subject matter of Thor and epic-ish battles combined with his style make so many panels in this book look like cover art for 80s heavy metal albums.

It's surprising to see Jason Aaron produce such an uninspired comic but that's what this is. The God Butcher is a barely involving storyline that jumps around in time to make you think things are happening when they're not. The story barely has a pulse, the characters are dull, and this book is utterly tedious to read. Thank god(s) for Wolverine and the X-Men!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Epic Thor Adventure, 7 Jan. 2014
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This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
I have fallen in love with Thor ever since I saw the first marvel film some years ago (I used to think he was an overgrown Asterix, to be honest), & decided to give the comic form a whirl - this turned out to be a great decision.
This volume is the first in a two part epic adventure spanning three different timelines in Thor's, rather long, life, & if you give this one a read, you will surely pick the second one up with great haste.
I could not put either of them down, once I began reading that was it. The story is great, & the artwork? Wow! Esad Ribic left my jaw a gasp with every panel (bar the final two or three pages of volume 2, which seemed rather rushed, unfortunately).
My imagination has now well & truly been captured by The Thunder God & Mjolnir in both the cinematic & comic universes alike. So much so, I have since purchased the entire runs of both Joe Michael Stracynski & Kieran Gillen, & look forward to the future releases in this series & to future purchases of the Matt Fraction series.
Be warned; following this purchase, your purse strings may loosen further, with The Thunder God no doubt to blame.
Absolutely love this & can't wait for volume 3 to be released (even if Esad Ribic isn't in charge of orchestrating the artwork... but he is back for the volume after!).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, 9 April 2014
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Arived quickly and in good condition. First graphic novel series that i've read for a while. Fantastic artwork and a great story. As with all time travel stories its kinda a bit funky, but knowingly so. The read heart of the story is in the morality the gods themselves and how Thor thinks/feels about what he battles.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why isn't there more attraction, 27 Jun. 2013
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I think Marvel Now has been sort of swept under the rug, yes it's not as big as a complete relauch of every comic from #1 (like DC Done), Marvel Now is producing some amazing comics. Thor is one of them.

Let's get straight to the point i hate Thor. It's a "God" (Alien) that swings a hammer. There.
But this is Amazing. You can feel how Vulnerable Thor has become, I mean some guy is wiping out the God's. It's like Thor is a moth in a creepy ten year old's back garden, its gonna get it's wings yanked.

The book is split into 3 Versions of Thor from different timelines, His young reckless age, his middle still kinda reckless more knowledgeable stage, and his old am the last God alive stage.

Also the fact it comes with Digital Copies of this whole Trade and the Augmented Reality feature in some of the pages really show, marvel has made something special with this series.
I won't go into to much detail some other review already has, This is a must buy, really, i don't say that alot, I even bought it in Hardcover (i don't do that alot either)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Introduction to Comic Books and Thor, 4 Jan. 2014
By 
Daniel Bloor (England, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
I decided to purchase this through a recommendation on Youtube. I tried to keep myself to reading one issue in the volume at a time to pace myself out, but by the last 2 or 3 I couldn't stop. The story arc and the art are amazing and carries on through the Godbomb volume brilliantly. This has made me think about starting to read comic books regularly.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 21 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Thor: God of Thunder (Paperback)
I have been reading and collecting super-hero comics since the 1950s. I still recall my father bringing me home Fantastic Four #2 from a newstand across where he worked. Thor has always been one of my favourites, and yes I still have Journey into Mystery #83, where we were introduced to "The Mighty Thor". My reading tastes are wide, I am not a comics nerd as such ( though nothing wrong with this) and I cannot understand how under-appreciated some of the writing and artwork of comics is in the wider literary field.
This graphic novel is nothing short of a tour de force. As the title suggests, Gods are being butchered, and as Thor investigates, he and we find it is linked to an incident in his youth. So we switch from the youthful, brass, drinking and wenching Thor, to the current and future Thor. The villain is scary to say the least. I have to admit I did not know this was Volume 1 of the storyline, but I have now ordered Volume 2 "GodBomb" which, if it is only half as good as "God Butcher" will still be great.
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Thor: God of Thunder
Thor: God of Thunder by Esad Ribic (Paperback - 8 April 2013)
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