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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Story of Adoption
Hannah Pool, a journalist for a British newspaper, was born in a small Eritrean town called Keren in 1974. Placed in an orphanage in Asmara, Eritrea's capital, shortly after her birth she grew up believing her mother had died in childbirth with her father dying shortly afterwards. When she was roughly six months old, malnourished and suffering from chicken pox, she was...
Published on 8 Sep 2005 by Craobh Rua

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review
Interesting as a book, good subject matter but very poorly written I thought. Would not recommend this book to anyone else.
Published 7 months ago by gillian avice potter


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Story of Adoption, 8 Sep 2005
This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Hardcover)
Hannah Pool, a journalist for a British newspaper, was born in a small Eritrean town called Keren in 1974. Placed in an orphanage in Asmara, Eritrea's capital, shortly after her birth she grew up believing her mother had died in childbirth with her father dying shortly afterwards. When she was roughly six months old, malnourished and suffering from chicken pox, she was adopted by David Pool, a British academic, and his American wife, Marya. At the time, David was teaching at the University of Khartoum and Marya was doing voluntary work with some nuns.
Marya died when Hannah was four and briefly went to stay with some friends in Norway before moving back to England with her dad. By the time she was twenty, David was lecturing at Manchester University, with Eritrean politics among his areas of expertise. When Eritrea won its independence from Ethiopia in the early 1990s, the guerrilla fighters he'd got to know in the 1970s had become government ministers. David was among the people invited over for the celebrations and, on impulse, went looking for the orphanage in Asmara. Not only was it still standing, it was still being run by the same nun - Sister Gabriela - who'd arranged Hannah's adoption.
Several months after David's return home came the bombshell : a priest David had spoken to at the orphanage wrote a letter with the news that not only was Hannah's biological father still alive, she also had at least one older brother. "My Fathers' Daughter" tells the story of Hannah's trip back to Eritrea to meet her 'natural' family for the first time.
This is a very easily read book, though it can't have been a very easy one to write. Hannah doesn't spare herself - her doubts, panics, frustrations and the occasional bout of confusion are all covered. The fact that much of the book is written in the present tense, in nearly a conversational tone, really helped put those feelings across. At times, it felt like I was intruding on something a little too personal - like someone else's diary, I was unsure I 'should' be reading parts of it. At the same time, however, it almost felt like the book finished too soon. The epilogue, looking back over the year after she returned home, could nearly have been worth a book itself. Very highly recommended.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing story, 28 April 2006
By 
A. Grundy "Alex Grundy" (Manchester) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Paperback)
You can't comprehend how you would cope if you believed you were an orphan and then discovered you weren't. But Hannah Pool's book is heartwarming and inclusive. It brings you into the story, feeling her fear, nervousness, excitement and joy.

Told with humility and humour it's a great story that will bring a tear to your eye.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Real and Honest read, 10 Mar 2006
This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Hardcover)
Once I started reading this book I found it really hard to put it down, I read it front to back in 2 days. Hannah Pool's story is one that I'm sure many individuals can relate to, whether they are black or white, female or male and in fact from anywhere in the world.
This book is full of emotion and it even has bits of comedy in it. This book is a must read !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Review, 29 Nov 2013
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This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Paperback)
Interesting as a book, good subject matter but very poorly written I thought. Would not recommend this book to anyone else.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Homecoming, 1 Dec 2011
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Mr. M. Hinstridge (Liverpool UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Paperback)
Having read Miss Pool in the Guardian over several years and read the reviews there and in the Observer I had a good idea of her writing style, so she presents a book well worth reading and enjoyable. The book arrived as so often with Amazon a day or so before it was expected. Having been to Nigeria I can understand the contrasts between both countries for her and is worth reading for this aspect too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful and well written - joy and pain, 15 Sep 2011
By 
maven (solihull, uk) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Paperback)
Hannah's journey is amazing - her writing is honest and skillful. This is an essential read if you want to know how being adopted feels - the inner conflict and guilt mixed with joy and gratitude.
For me, this has some of the best descriptions of how it feels to be adopted - some of her observations pierced me to the core. I have discussed this book with friends who are adopted and they agree - joy and pain. At last I have found someone who could put into words how it feels to be adopted.
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3.0 out of 5 stars interesting read, 19 Sep 2009
By 
Helsie (Cheshire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Fathers' Daughter (Paperback)
This book was very thought provoking - its a very interesting story and I enjoyed the journey the author went on / through to meet her birth family.
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My Fathers' Daughter (Charnwood Large Print)
My Fathers' Daughter (Charnwood Large Print) by Hannah Pool (Hardcover - Aug 2006)
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