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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little gem
It's long been a bit of a mystery to me why Lucy Wadham isn't a more celebrated or recognised writer. Certainly I found her last full-length novel 'Greater Love' stunningly evocative and powerful - more so than anything Ian McEwan or Sebastian Faulks have managed in their last couple of books.

For those who have yet to discover her, this lovely (and beautifully...
Published 15 months ago by Freddie Baveystock

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3.0 out of 5 stars Celebration of growing up and not about the Circle Line
Like the other reviewers, I think Lucy Wadham is a good writer. What the book isn't is a direct celebration of London's Underground transport system which the series of titles was produced to commemorate.
Published 9 months ago by Allen Tsui


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5.0 out of 5 stars Super!, 19 April 2013
By 
H. Andrews (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heads and Straights: The Circle Line (Penguin Underground Lines) (Paperback)
What a super autobiographical snippet.
A lovely quick read, which took me back to the 80s.
Finally provides me the opportunity to claim to be straight - not that it's the desirable option here.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hippies and Squares, 8 Mar 2013
By 
Elodie (Swansea Valley, Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heads and Straights: The Circle Line (Penguin Underground Lines) (Paperback)
I'll leave the definition of Heads and Straights to Lucy herself.'The King's Road, as my mother knew, was awash with drugs...Heads were people who smoked pot and Straights were people who didn't. In time these two categories would broaden to include, on the one hand, people who are cool, spontaneous and open-minded, and, on the other, people who have a tendency to play safe.' This book is a fond memoir of Lucy Wadham's busy, bourgeois, bohemian, Bloomsbury family and her childhood in Chelsea. She has four sisters and one brother. Her maternal grandmother was friends with Virginia Woolf and a definite Head. 'Eileen's love of Virginia Woolf was all encompassing. It embraced not only the woman's work but also her prejudices: the championing of Art above Commerce and the belief in Beauty as a portal to truth.' One of her uncles never quite returned from an acid trip and was looked after for the rest of his life by his mother and another uncle became a dope-smoking writer who went to live in California. Lucy's parents are somewhat laissez-faire with their daughters and let them do what they want which is basically experiment with life, sex and drugs. The family home is always full of strangers and weirdos and her mother frequently complains that she can't get into her own kitchen. When Lucy is seventeen her father's business goes bust. The house is sold and the parents decamp to Australia leaving their daughters pretty much stranded in London. Her older sister Fly develops a serious heroin habit and Lucy begs her bank manager for a big enough overdraft to buy Fly a ticket to Sydney to join her parents - which probably saves her life. Lucy herself stays and passes her entrance exams to Oxford. The book is filled with beautiful vignettes and amusing anecdotes. As the wife of the poet Simon R. Gladdish (who was born in Uganda) I particularly enjoyed the scenes set in Kenya where her mother grew up. She ends the book with a touching tribute to her father who died whilst she was writing it. 'It is 1972 and I am eight. Dad is holding me firmly by the wrists and dangling me from the top of the Pont du Gard, a Roman aqueduct in France about 160 feet high. We're grinning gleefully at each other and I feel both utterly endangered and utterly safe.' This enchanting memoir is only 95 pages long and can be read in a couple of hours. Who will it appeal to? Everyone.
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Heads and Straights: The Circle Line (Penguin Underground Lines)
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