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71 of 78 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If it ain't broke...
'Superfreakonomics' is the cumbersomely titled sequel to the bestselling 'Freakonomics' - a book that gave an entertaining overview of microeconomics, and supplied plenty of food for thought. If you enjoyed the first volume, you will undoubtedly enjoy 'SuperFreakonomics'. It is essentially the same book, but with different case studies - if your first book sold over four...
Published on 23 Oct 2009 by Quicksilver

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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as freakonomics
An enjoyable book that covers some unusual subjects but is not as good as the original freakonomics book.

This one goes into a lot more detail on a single subject and as a result is not as wide-ranging, and does at times feel as if its trying to imply that the reader cannot draw their own conclusions from the initial information provided. The original...
Published on 8 April 2010 by Darren Henman


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superfreakonomics even better than Freakonomics, 6 Dec 2009
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If u liked Freakonomics you will definetely enjoy this reading. I liked it so much that I decided to buy it as a Christmas present for a couple of friends.

Worth reading it - yes. Will you enjoy it - most probably yes. Will you agree with everything - no.

Overall "good bread for thinking".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Six to one and half a dozen to the other, 6 Dec 2009
I lost my 'psycho/micro-economy-book' cherry to Freakonomics and from then on became absolutely hooked, devouring the Gladwells and Harfords etc. I really do love these types of books and soak em up in a couple of hours. So as you can imagine, I was really, really looking forward to the follow up to the one that started it all for me...here's my lists of positives and negatives

-ves
1. Birthdate bulges....heard about this before
2. Hang on a sec...that woman in Queens who got murdered and loads of people saw her, Milgram's experiment, the prison experiment, 19th century doctors not washing their hands in prep for birthing. Gali-bloody-leo?? Come on chaps, give us a new one!
3. There aren't really many chapters in this. So my overall criticism is that a lot of this is old rehashed stuff even if they draw different conclusions

Having said that...+ves
1. I really liked that it is not a PC book at all. There are a number of points above and beyond stuff on climate change where they are treading into reasonably challenging territory
2. Read to cover to cover in a few hours. So it is quite engaging.
3. Some interesting ideas on climate change. High end prostitution sounds more attractive...

It's by no means a bad book. Quite enjoyable in fact and if you've not read this kind of thing before you may just love it as it's easy to read and persuasive and has some really interesting ideas. But for a popular economy book loving saddo such as I...it was alright.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LOVE LOVE LOVE this!, 3 Dec 2009
By 
Laura Smith (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
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Oh wow, I really really enjoyed this. A great follow on the the amazing Freakonomics, this book made me really feel like I was learning some very interesting things, whilst also being very entertained. I love the way it is written, there is just the right amount of facts and figures in there to make me feel very clever, but it is fun enough to keep my attention! I really hope there is another of these books in the pipeline, i could carry on reading this stuff forever! I don't like to spoil books but I will say that the monkeys at the end had me howling laughing and recounting what i had read to anyone who would listen!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind (Opening) / Blowing insights into Our World., 20 Nov 2009
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Mr. H. MCDERMOTT "mytooth" (Dundalk, Ireland) - See all my reviews
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What a book! Not since 'Gut Feelings' a couple of years ago, have I read such an enthralling book. I could'nt put it down once I had started it. It is so well written with a background of humour for such serious subjects. I really enjoyed the deeper thinking and realistic approach to the disputed Global Warming problem - so refreshing from the 'Goresqe' panic outlook.
I will never forget the conclusion of one of the chapters in the book - "Friends never let friends walk home drunk"!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Witty and insightful, 19 Nov 2009
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A Common Reader "Committed to reading" (Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
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For those who enjoy finding a new take on modern life, this book is the book to read.

The authors delight in looking at the statistics and economics behind our lives and coming up with novel and suprising findings. For example, there are some interesting ways in which potential terrorists could be identified before they commit their crimes, simply by analysing their bank account activity. Apparently this information is so sensitive that the authors take us so far and then no further (presumably in case terrorists read the book and learn to adapt their behaviour!).

Or there is a fascinating discussion on whether to submit to chemotherapy if you get cancer. It seems that the drug companies are in cahoots with the medical profession to encourage you to take expensive treatments, even when the effects may only be a lot of pain and discomfort, even if a month or two is added to your lifespan (I think I knew that already!).

The discussion about prostitution is interesting in that the authors have found a market where there are benefits in charging your customers increasing amounts of money, to the benefit of both of you. The high class call girl and her client's lives just get better and better, the higher the fees.

This is an interesting book, the sort of thing that's engrossing on a long train journey, but perhaps not the sort of thing to commit several days of your life to. It certainly makes one question many common assumptions and I suppose its lessons could be applied to many other situation.

I'll give it four stars - witty and amusing, but perhaps not a "must-read".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good follow-up to Freakonomics, 17 Nov 2009
By 
J. Baldwin "Reader" (Dundee, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I enjoyed the original title - not as much as I'd hoped as despite the rhetoric and the attractive counterintuitive take on life it offered, it contained quite a few flaws in logic with frequent post hoc analyses of events. Economists and sociologists would disagree about many things (in fact they do) and Freakonomics suffered from not having a balancing sociological take on events.
The same, I fear, is true here. Except one of the problems here is the lack of a scientific interpretation. The now infamous chapter on global warming is an objective economic assessment of the situation but by missing out much of the existing evidence from other fields, it is easily interpreted (misinterpreted according to the authors?) as climate change denial.
I'll let you make your own mind up but while I accepted the author's defence on The Daily Show I think the wider moral ramifications were lost on him - it's all very well having a bit of fun and saying "what if" but this book will be read widely and the risk that it is held up as "evidence" that global warming is a good thing is very real.

But remember, the authors are setting out to provoke in a good way - to offer alternative views of the world that are often odd but make sense when you think about it. It's highly readable and, yes, thought provoking. If you enjoyed the original book, you'll like this. But you don't have to have read it to enjoy Superfreakonomics.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A real disappointment, 19 Nov 2010
I remember a sixties music hit out of nowhere by a group called Amen Corner: original, mind-numbing, flesh-tingling. Then their record label (I assume) asked them to do the same again, but different of course. So they used the same themes, the same rhythms, the same atmosphere. And it bombed.
That's how I feel about Superfreakonomics.
The first book I passed on to friends; it really opened ones eyes.
This one? Well, I've read it with interest, but it reads like a follow-through requested by the publishers. Yes, nuggets of interest, but overall, as my title says, a real disappointment.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The law of diminishing returns, 29 Oct 2009
By 
Davywavy2 - See all my reviews
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The first book by these authors - freakonomics - was an unexpected success and so it stands to reason that one of the basic rules of economics (that people act in their own perceived best interests) would result in them churning out another in fairly short order.
On the face of it, it's more of the same - applying statistical analysis to everyday life and turning up some results which you felt you always sort-of knew but it's quite nice to see it demonstrated. It's a handy conversation piece in that regard, but the problem this this sequel turns up is that a large chunks of the book feel either underdeveloped in terms of interest (such as the section on spotting potential terrorists through their economic activity - apparently it's possible but the authors can't/won't tell you how, which makes the chapter largely unedifying) or overdeveloped in terms of the personal experience and interests of the authors (such as an interesting piece of supply & demand economics illustrated by Chicago prostitution, which goes off on a long and pointless tangent about a single case which serves little purpose but to show us that the authors interviewed an actual prostitute).

There have been a number of reviews being very rude about the chapter on climate change/global warming, and I don't know enough about the science to know who is right either way. Certainly the chapter didn't seem any worse argued or presented than any other part of the book, but I suspect that Climate Change is one of those subjects which makes normally mild-mannered people get very dogmatic so perhaps it's best to take both the chapter and people's reactions to it with a pinch of salt.

On the face of it, Superfreakonomics is simply more of the same as Freakonomics, but overall less interesting because a lot of the conclusions you could guess yourself if you've read the original and tried to think in the same way. As such, three Stars.
However, it contains so much interesting data and grounds for over-dinner arguments, that in terms of sheer potential entertainment and diversion it would be churlish not to give it an additional star just for that. It depends if you're reading for entertainment, content, education, or ammunition for a ding-dong row over dinner with some like-minded and witty friends.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More of the same - and that's a good thing!, 28 Nov 2009
By 
Marc Munier (Brighton, England) - See all my reviews
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If you enjoyed Freakonomics you'll like this book even more, the chapters are bursting full of interesting facts - I read it in a weekend - couldn't put it down.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super freaky!, 23 Oct 2009
By 
Morena - See all my reviews
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This is the follow-up to Freakonomics, and basically continues the theme which, as they say, is that people respond to incentives in often unexpected ways. There is a fair amount of myth-busting too, regarding things such as bystander apathy, altruism and child car seats! They also discuss simple, 'thinking outside the box' potential solutions to global warming, and explore the economics of prostitution. As always, it's very readable and easy to follow, while also giving you a lot of food for thought. It closes with a fascinating chapter about the effect of the introduction of money to a group of lab monkeys... has to be read to be believed!
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