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on 8 September 2007
I was very dissapointed with Jac Rayners first two efforts for the ninth and tenth doctor range of books, and wasnt expecting much of The Last Dodo. But I have to say this story is definitely miles better than those two put together.

So the Doctor and Martha go in search of the living dodo but end up in the museum of the last ones. A good and cool imaginative setting. This story has a moral tone to it. The horrible stuff involved with animals and fashion and money making. This story is highly enjoyable, with good twists and turns. All the characters are pretty good and memorable too. Making this story one of the most accomplished of all the stories in this range.

So im glad that i can say that Jac aint so bad at writing after all. I hope she does more stories like this one in the future...
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An original novel featuring the tenth doctor who and his companion martha jones. As with all of these it tells a story not seen on tv, runs for roughly 243 pages, and can be read by those of all ages. the characterisation of the two main characters is spot on, especially considering this one was writtn before martha was seen on tv.

the story involves the two of them finding a museum that preserves extinct species, and dealing with thefts from it. that lead to a whole lot more.

a slight format breaker in that portions of each chapter are narrated by martha in the first person. this is an approach you quickly get used to. same goes for the prologue which is from the point of view of a dodo. each chapter also ends with a descrption of an extinct species. these are pretty informative.

this is a book that sets out to educate as well as entertain, and it deals with the moral issues surrounding extinction and whether animals should be in zoos or allowed to roam free. in a nice moment the doctor acknowledges there's social commentary around. It's never terribly preachy, though, and it does offer food for thought.

plot wise though this does take a while to get going, and the first one hundred pages are very episodic. it's difficult to see where things are going. but the second half of the book does a great job of tying all this together, along with some genuinely original concepts.

a very good enty in the range. if the first half was as strong as the second it would be a five star review
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on 6 June 2016
This is a fairly early adventure for Marth in the Tardis. She is clearly still adjusting to what the Tardis is capable of and when asked where she would like to visit in all of time and space, much to the Doctor’s disappointment, she can only think of suggesting the zoo. The Doctor’s plans to do this in his usual style results in them arriving at one of the most extreme ‘zoos’ in the universe, one the size of a planet which contains in suspended animation the last living example of every species to become extinct.

Obviously the whole novel depends heavily on the idea of this strange zoo, the Museum of the Lost Ones. It is an interesting concept but does lead to the story being cluttered with multiple ecological issues that aren’t really explored in any coherent way. Some weighty subjects are glossed over in a light hearted manner. If there was intended to be a moral message to this book it gets a bit lost in events, clichés and all the teleporting around.

The ‘I-Spyder’ element is a novel idea. It is a device given to Marth by the Doctor that works as a kind of datapad-cum-guidebook to animal spotting. For the purpose of the plot it serves as an artifice to make the narrative focus more on Martha when the Doctor is off doing things and potentially serves the purpose in the real world of educating younger readers about extinct species. However, every time the book devotes a couple of pages to what the machine is supposedly displaying it quite drastically breaks up the pacing, action and dramatic tension. The novelty soon wears off and it does become a bit tedious and irritating.

The Doctor is reasonably well characterised but much of this comes from how Martha perceives him. This is an adventure really portrayed from the companion’s [perspective and much of it is written as Marth in the first person. This is a somewhat different approach from the bulk of the BBC Doctor Who books published around the same period and make sit stand out a bit.

However, the characterisation of Martha is often a tad off, sometimes feeling like a younger, less mature version of the onscreen character. Also some of the cultural references don’t seem like things Martha would be interested in.

A small part of the novel is also related from the perspective of a dodo, named after an earlier companion of the Doctor’s.

The novel is fun and mildly amusing for the most part. The story, although entertaining, is a little predictable. However, it does have an unexpected twist after you think everything has been resolved.
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on 21 May 2009
Jacqueline Rayner's latest Tenth Doctor and Martha novel is a poignant and well-observed dig at the way we neglect and thoughtlessly destroy wildlife on our planet. The Tenth Doctor, as played on TV by David Tennant, is appropriately restless and frenetic, while his medical student companion Martha is less adoring of him and more interesting than she ever was on TV. The story is fast-paced and accessible, and overall this is a decent entry in the BBC Books' original series.
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on 1 August 2011
This Doctor and Martha book introduces Martha in book form quite well, of course there were probably others before this one, but it's the first one I have bought.

The Last Dodo: The Doctor and Martha go in search of a real live dodo, and are transported by the TARDIS to the mysterious Museum of the Last Ones. There, in the Earth section, they discover every extinct creature up to the present day, all still alive and in suspended animation.

Preservation is the museum's only job - collecting the last of every endangered species from all over the universe. But exhibits are going missing...

Can the Doctor solve the mystery before the museum's curator adds the last of the Time Lords to her collection?

This book is a fantastic Martha Jones story and sometimes speakes in first person.
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on 8 January 2014
I've never read any of these new adventures and so, seeing this in my local library, thought I would give one a go. I must say I really enjoyed this! Reading it, I could hear the voices of the Doctor and Martha in my head and the author caught their characteristics and mannerisms down to a tee! The story is great too- telling the story of a museum where all the last members of every extinct species are kept.
A highlight for me was when the curator mentions the fact that the Daleks have been on the verge of extinction more times than she can count! It is little touches like this that true Whovians will enjoy and that make reading this a sheer delight!
Hopefully now I can discover more of these books but this one was fantastic....and you know what? So was I!
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on 31 August 2007
I really like the idea of Martha telling half the story in the first person. It's an original and unique idea which admittedly needs a certain kind of plot for it to work, but with this, it's great.

I've actually only got the audio CD, read by Freema Agyeman who plays Martha in the series, and the 'Martha in the First Person' bits are really brought to life with her lively voice.

I really like that in this book, the friendship between the Doctor and Martha is shown more. This didn't happen as strongly as it did in the Doctor'n'Rose books, probably because those were all written in the third person.

Any way, I really enjoy listening to the audio cd. I'm currently listening to it for about the 20th time. Cant wait to read the other two 'Martha' books!
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on 19 April 2013
After a trip to the zoo, the Doctor and Martha go in search of a real live dodo, and are transported by the TARDIS to the mysterious Museum of the Last Ones. There, in the Earth section, they discover every extinct creature up to the present day - billions of them, from the tiniest insect to the biggest dinosaur, all still alive and in suspended animation.

Preservation is the Museum's only job - collecting the last of every endangered species from all over the universe. And for millennia the Museum has been trying to trace one elusive specimen: the last of the Time Lords...

Featuring the Tenth Doctor and Martha as played by David Tennant and Freema Agyeman in the acclaimed Doctor Who series from BBC Television.
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on 29 May 2014
You can't really go wrong with the Dr Who audio books. The stories are always interesting and this one in particular had some funny moments with the Dodo adopted by Martha. Definitely recommend.
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on 3 February 2010
Great book. Intriguing premise, a touching, emotional message, and a few false ends to keep you guessing. The story is also seen from different perspectives - diary, recollections as well as the normal third person, whilst Martha clocks up points on her 'last animal' list, which intersperses the chapters. It gives you things to think about as well as being a good old Doctor Who tale, and though the message is quite depressing at times it made me determined to do better. See what you think when you read it.
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