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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but contains errors, 3 Aug 2013
By 
C. MARKUSS (Bridgend UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
I was privileged to know the late Paddy Griffith, and supplied him with material that in the end he did not include on the mental breakdown of some men who had survived their tanks being knocked out far too often. Alas, the book does contain some errors but it nonetheless a fine effort@

P. 23, all the Italian vehicles listed had diesel, not petrol, engines. Some Shermans, specifically the M4A2, had diesel engines too. In the text the author fails to mention that German face-hardened armour would shatter British 2-pdr AP and US 75mm AP projectiles.

P. 26, the side armour on the PzKfw III was not thinner than that on the PzKfw IV as both had 30mm (a small number of PzKfw IV Ausf. E had, exceptionally, 20+20mm plates), and the PzKfw III's frontal armour was much thicker at 50+20mm whereas the hull and turret armour on the PzKfw IV never exceeded 50mm.

P. 27, the author's "almost precisely [sic]" is a contradiction; the British 25-pdr gun's calibre was exactly 87.4mm. The gun suffered as an anti-tank weapon for a number of reasons not mentioned by the author. Until 1943 only `plugged HE' rather than AP shot was supplied, and even plain steel AP shot was liable to shatter against German face-hardened armour. Moreover, at first only 8 (later 12) rounds per gun were supplied for `self-defence' against enemy tanks, and as the gun had a curved trajectory obtaining a hit was difficult except at suicidally-close range.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars confusion explained, 17 May 2010
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This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
I had heard people talk about how desert fighting is like naval warfare, but did not really understand. This explains that and the generic examples of different operation e.g. Afrikakorps on the attack are very clear and helpful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth The cover Price, 20 April 2009
This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
An all too brief treatment of the subject which provides a very concise, well written over-view for the hobbyist. It is further enlivened by some hilariously bitchy digs at the British tank experts Fuller and Liddell Hart.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars British WW2 desert tactics, 4 Jun 2008
By 
N. Brown (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
Unlike some of Osprey's other output this a very readable book thanks to style of the author who doesn't hold back on his opinions. This made the book a pleasure to read. In fact, the problem is that there isn't more as the Osprey format dictates few pages and lots of illustrations so it's easy to get through the whole book in a couple of hours. This space contraint means that this is more of a look at how British and Commonwealth tactics evolved between 1940 and 1943 in response to an already tactically fully-competent Africa Korps rather than a rounded look at all the armies in that theatre. After an excellent start to the book you get the impression of a hurried finish to fit in with the space left. Which is a shame as the author's style does leave you wanting more. Let's hope that Osprey commission a few more from Paddy in future.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another Good Osprey book, 17 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
Osprey has cornered the market in these books. About 100 pages long they provide a clear and compelling narrative of the tactics used in the desert campaign. Good analysis of the men, machines and commanders with great maps and of course those excellent centrefold illustrations.

Excellence as standard
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine book well worth the price, 22 May 2013
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This review is from: Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) (Paperback)
This is a high quality osprey mainly due to the author's writing style.

I sometimes struggle with some osprey where the text seems to be downloaded from a webpage and barely edited. But here, one can see the effort that Paddy Griffith has put into the book. He is enthusiast and conveys his theories and ideas very well.

All is very good, The photographs, the plates, the bibliography and the structure of the book.

All the various WWII desert tactics involving tanks, infantry, artillery AT guns, mine fields, etc are described in the book as you would expect. The author divides the first half of his book between the various factions: British, Germans and Italians.
Paddy Griffith is also not shy of his opinion when talking about tank experts such as fuller and Lidell-Hart. Actually, I personally think he is going slightly too far and overemphasize his disagreement with the theories of the time.

One negative thing I noticed is that you need to have some background on the war taking place in North Africa. I found it hard to follow the war development from Paddy Griffith's book.

One thing missing is a geographic map showing the terrain more clearly. The war in North Africa was heavily influenced by the terrain and I would have liked to see a good map of the overall region showing the main offensive and defensive lines.

Overall a very good book that I enjoyed reading.

I would surely recommend the author and will look toward buying more of his work.
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Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite)
Elite 162: World War II Desert Tactics (Elite) by Paddy Griffith (Paperback - 10 April 2008)
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