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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and informative
Right from the start this book provides an insightful analysis of the Corporate world around us. Not limiting itself to an in depth look at the world inside the boardroom, it provides an interesting and easily accessible account of why many of the things that are happening around us, happen.
It is essential reading for anyone who has an interest in business.
It...
Published on 13 Oct. 2004 by M. Ward

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shallow and slightly repetitive
I wonder if this content works better in documentary format(not sure which came first?)- because as a book it doesn't really get into the nitty gritty.

I also think this book may be of more interest (educational value) to people who don't work in a corporate environment because a lot of the details are blindingly obvious from within; such as corporations exist...
Published on 21 Jan. 2009 by Misty


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Shallow and slightly repetitive, 21 Jan. 2009
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
I wonder if this content works better in documentary format(not sure which came first?)- because as a book it doesn't really get into the nitty gritty.

I also think this book may be of more interest (educational value) to people who don't work in a corporate environment because a lot of the details are blindingly obvious from within; such as corporations exist to maximise shareholder value, and corporate do-gooding is mostly marketing. There is enough repetition of these points to feel tiresome in such a short book and the shock factor of using words like 'pathological' and 'psychopathic' wears thin pretty quickly. The most interesting area is solutions/alternatives to the curerent model and this is not dealt with strongly - as if the author thought about it a bit and then decided it was too difficult (which to be fair maybe it is!)

The main section of the book could have been edited down into a decent 2 part article in a magazine or journal and doesn't really have enough substance to justify a book. A collection of essays or interviews with differing standpoints would have been a better treatment in a short/accessible format.

On the plus side there are some interesting historical/legal points on the development of the concept, and examples of corporations 'gone bad', and the musing on why they can't really 'do good' is well presented.
The interview with the great Noam Chomsky in the appendix is the best part of the book and well worth a read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Corporation defined, 11 Aug. 2008
By 
Mr. M. Hassan (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
More and more people are voicing their opinion that the reason for the worlds' problems are corporations, but few are able to ellaborate why.

This book analyzes how the Corporation was conceived, and how over time it gained more power to the point now where through the funding of presidential candidates, how they use this as a proverbial bribe to ensure they get what they want.

The book cites many examples of how this entity is deemed as Pathological, and why it is shocking that while there are many wars being fought on abstract nouns - Terror, drugs etc, Corporations are continuing to cause harm on an unprecedented scale right in front of our eyes!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read, 24 Oct. 2004
I very much enjoyed "The Corporation" and devoured it in a day. However, for anyone who has (like myself) read No Logo or anything in a similar vein, it will mostly be old news.
Looking forward to the documentary, which I'm going to see in the pictures on Friday.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting, 29 Oct. 2010
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
This book give a good insight of corporations and their actions/power. It is a must for anyone interested in sustainable development.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlighting and informative about the reform of Captialism, 29 Nov. 2004
By 
J. Maher (Rochdale , Lancs, UK) - See all my reviews
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Anyone interested in business or society this a an essential book to read. The book is easily accessiable and an enjoyable read but its a devasting critqiue on the behaviours of corporations and the consqences of profit at any cost motive and the damage its doing to the world.
Marx was right according to Bakan that eventually the Captialists are signing their own fate by grossing out on the fat profits.
Bakan provides with solutions from both sides of the argument in a clear and unambigous way but strongly comes down in favour of Government regualtion to tame the gross excesses of captialism and to put Human life and protection of the enviroment at the centre of future business organizations.
Highly recommened read for anyone either left or right in their political persusions.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, but standard fare for this sort of book, 26 May 2014
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I found this interesting but nothing remarkable, there is a bit of history on the evolution of corporations, followed by standard treatises on Enron, Worldcom, and erosion of government regulation.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Narcissists, Sociopaths and Psychopaths Rule OK!, 11 Nov. 2013
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Interesting book. Highlights the problems in society when those in power, whether, it' s politics, banks, multinationals or religions, tend to be highly dysfunctional, toxic and there for themselves. No greater good or aspiration.

2000 years of Judeo/Christian influence reflects this dominance. Wars, greed, power lust, inequality,slavery, chlid labour and abuse, all at the feet of these 'almost' inhuman beings. They have no empathy. No sense of inclusion. They are exclusive.

They can never be wrong. Are malicious, vindictive and pathological liars.

What a mess. And what chance do we really have?

No answers there unfortunately, but does shed light on our current predicament. I.e. Bankers, Politicians, Religious Leaders of all denominations and big bosses.

These people are toxic and they walk amongst us. Like aliens in human form.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but badly flawed, 17 Dec. 2008
By 
P. Brooks (Isle of Man, British Isles) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
This is a well written work but very shallow in scope and analysis. Joel Bakan does identify part of a real problem but offers the unoriginal and tired solution that more regulation is necessary. He entirely misses the point that so-called deregulation of corporations and so-called privatization has been largely illusory and highly deceptive. Those words have been used to cloak a vast shell game where regulation and oversight have been used in a cosy government-corporate tango to favour the big political, corporate, and financial muscle. In other words, you cannot separate the oligarchical interests of big politicians and big bankers and big corporations. A single word describes it: CORRUPTION, albeit often subtle.

No amount of extra regulation helps. In fact, quite the reverse. The more regulation, the more corruption flourishes. Big corporations cope easily with regulation and corruption. It is the small family business and the consumer that suffers most.

Bakan gives a passing nod to these problems but weakly responds that at least the ordinary person has an occasional democratic vote at the ballot box.

It is painfully obvious that democracy (in the sense of governance truly representing the bulk of the population) has failed in the West. The citizen is ignored, even on major issues. (Iraq war? Banker Scam?) A few weeks before election time a left-right glove puppet charade is conducted where big corporate funded wealthy identi-candidates are sold via the corporate media, while real candidates who might effect real change are censored, sidelined, and denigrated.

Bakan makes passing mention of a much better way the citizen can vote - with their pocket books and with boycott. But he denigrates it by saying no one can be expected to vote against their self-interest. Huh? Is voting for a generally corrupt politician who 'might' do some good for you on one out of a thousand issues, and who 'might' stand up to the financial blandishments offered by Big Business, a better bet than refusing to buy the products of a rogue corporation.

Bakan makes no mention of the real solution--Common Law (CL). Perversely, the very laws and regulations that he is proposing have been steadily diminishing this option. He of all people, a Professor of Law, should know that. For instance, Bakan gives an example of a man whose white shirt is soiled by fallout from a polluting smoke stack. He says we need regulation to stop that kind of damage to the interests of society and individuals. Well, sir, we've had the remedy for centuries. The principles are well established and the remedy is simple. Why neglect CL? One reason might be because corporations and lawyers--and Law Professors--love confusion and the importance it gives the practitioners of regulatory law. They can hide behind thickets of legislation. They profit, the costs are passed on to poor taxpayer and consumer.

Governments everywhere are turning to statute law and regulation to undermine Common Law precisely to protect corporations. It also makes legislators look important and appear to be 'doing something'. The American, British, and Australian governments have all recently passed, or are proposing to pass, laws protecting Big Pharma from claims of negligence and liability from any damage caused by drugs - even if the companies know of them in advance and fail to warn victims. Similar non-liability laws are increasingly applied to protect Corporates. It is a self -fulfilling cycle: The more government interferes, the more the market is destabilized and so the more excuse to interfere. Mr. Bakan wants to give more regulatory powers to these sorts of regimes?

Finally, Mr. Bakan repeatedly stresses the evil pathology of corporations. True, consequences of corporate actions can be evil. Regulation and government protections enhance this pathology. Robust application of CL would diminish it.

He strongly criticizes Risk/Benefit analysis and uses a particularly harrowing example to make his point, implying that there is no place for Risk/Benefit analysis where there might be any possibility of harm to the public. Well, sorry, but we can do nothing in this life without accepting an element of risk and knowing that some of that risk is going to come home somewhere at sometime. In the British Government Health Service Risk or Cost Benefit Analysis costs the lives of patients every single day. It is a hard fact that you cannot spend millions of pounds to extend the life of one patient for a few weeks - or even a few years. The vehicle crash case Joel Bakan examines could not be excused, but--once again--application of rights under Common Law pulled the company back into line, whereas relying solely on Government regulation would likely have failed, and possibly have facilitated a cover-up.

I have long puzzled how to deal with the corporate failings that this book highlights. I did not find any answers here. In describing the Big Corporation Mr. Bakan might just as well have been describing it's pathological crony-on-steroids, Big Government, whom he believes should be given more power. The diagnosis is flawed and the course of treatment proposed would make matters worse--much worse.

Still, it is worth reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent condition for a second hand book which I intend ..., 18 July 2014
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
Always wanted the book to go with the DVD. Excellent condition for a second hand book which I intend to keep on my bookshelf.
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5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful, hard to read, 19 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (Paperback)
the book is woderful. It can help me strengthen the understanding of my course.Good for exam to achieve high score
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The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power
The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan (Paperback - 23 Jun. 2005)
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