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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome
I loved reading about that match. It helped me know what happened in that magnificent game. I would read pat stantons Hibernian dream team.
Published on 18 Feb. 2013 by Matthew Fairnie

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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good times
I particularly enjoyed reading this account of one of the greatest days in our club's proud history. As one of what must have been around 20,000 Hibs fans to make the journey to Gorgie on that famous day, I found Brack's description of the game itself riveting. We may have one of the worst derby records in world football and have suffered countless humiliations at the...
Published on 22 Dec. 2012 by Guadiana


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, 18 Feb. 2013
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I loved reading about that match. It helped me know what happened in that magnificent game. I would read pat stantons Hibernian dream team.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just a game, 5 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7 (Hardcover)
The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7

Like the Hibs themselves, Ted Brack's books on his beloved football team have never been predictable. Starting with `There is a Bonny Fitba' Team' - an account of the author's own '50 Years on the Hibee Highway', he's moved through `ghosting' the autobiography of Lawrie Reilly, penning a retrospective on the Hibs career of Franck Sauzee, and helping Pat Stanton pick his team of all time Hibs greats. His latest outing focuses on the game that all Hibs fans love hearing about - particularly after their Hampden misery of May 2012 - "The Game on New Year's Day', 1973, which resulted in the score Hearts 0-7 Hibs.

It would be difficult task to devote an entire work to a single game, though, and, wisely, Ted has not attempted this. Instead he has done something much more resonant and interesting - focusing on the game, but also placing it in the context of what came before and after. Having succeeded in that, this book is as much a paeon of praise to that wonderful team known as `Turnbull's Tornadoes' as it is an account of a single game.

I think my enjoyment of this latest volume of Hibee History was down to voice it gives to the individuals who played that day. Even Alan Gordon and Erich Schaedler, both sadly no longer with us, and Arthur Duncan, whose legendary speed has taken him all the way to New Zealand, are quoted, but the rest of the team and coaches John Fraser and Stan Vincent feature throughout the book - with their views on football, Eddie Turnbull and each other. The bond between them is still obvious 40 years later and in revisiting that amazing season, as well as the Tynecastle game, you get the feeling that perhaps only now are these wonderful footballers realizing how close they were to true greatness.

For those who were at the game, the attraction is in finding out more about their heroes, what they were really like, how they thought about the game, the quirks of professional football in the 70s. They were one of the last generations of footballers who could claim a true connection to their fans, but, for all that, media coverage of them as people rather than footballers was not common. Now we discover who was the life and soul of the party, what Johnny Hamilton meant when he said he was feeling `brand new' and how Jim Herirot found out he would be leaving Easter Rd. Alec Cropley's move to Arsenal, as well as Pat Stanton's departure to Parkhead, is also covered in the words of the players themselves, as are the trials and tribulations of Mickey Edwards, and they are all honest and forthright in their summation of Eddie Turnbull - the manager and the man.

As in the Sauzee story, Ted gives the fans a section to reminisce and, interestingly recounts the memories not only of those who were at the game, but also those of fans whom, for whatever reason, missed the game that day. Thus the author's voice, mingled with that of players and fans, successfully conjures up the atmosphere of that very special era and that magnificent team of footballers.

Of course, the game itself has its own dedicated section - the goals and their build ups, the skill and tenacity of the players, the magnificent leadership of Pat Stanton, and the support's growing incredulity as the goals kept on coming. However, its place as yet another illustration of what this team of Tornadoes were about is well demonstrated with reference to other games where 7, 8 or 9 goals were scored and the phenomenal strike record of O'Rourke and Gordon.

To provide the context, we learn how the players joined Hibs originally, recall their victories in the Dryburgh and League Cups before this memorable result, and the author completes the circle by detailing Hibs' decline as that team were prematurely broken up, and tells what became of the personnel as they, one by one, moved on from Hibs to other teams and subsequent careers.

Naturally, Hibs fans will love this book, but I believe it has a wider resonance, for it speaks of a time when football in Scotland was in a different place - in terms of ability, popularity and passion.

After the upheaval of the past 6 months in the game, I can detect a reawakening of interest in a sport that might just be returning to a more equable state, away from the hegemony of the Old Firm. There are more folk out there now who are interested in the game's history and will read about great sides like the Tornadoes, even if they support other teams. They could do worse than read this book if they want to reach out and touch what it was like to be a football fan in the Scotland of the early 70s. All human life is here, as they used to say - Jock Stein, Alex Ferguson, Jim McLean, Alec MacDonald and even Davie Syme and JRP Gordon of Newport on Tay - the men in black!

It's not an exaggeration to say that the fans loved the Tornadoes and there was a rare affection between team members as well. They were a wonderfully gifted lot who, as their words in the book demonstrate, perhaps never fully appreciated how great they were. Ultimately that maybe prevented them from winning more medals, but it also made us love them more.

At times, this book brought tears to my eyes: once when the crack of Onion Brownlie's broken tib and fib as it echoed around the ground is recalled. If you want to know the other two occasions - what wee Jimmy O'Rourke did when he slipped out of the NB during the team's celebrations after the 72 League Cup win, and what a primary school janitor said to John Brownlie at Broomfield Park - you'll need to read the book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The 0-7 Hearts Hibs game., 15 May 2014
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Great to go back to the 70s for this game ! Don't think anything's compared since ! Great pics too. Bought it for Hubby, he's not much of a reader but he was happy with this !
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good times, 22 Dec. 2012
This review is from: The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7 (Hardcover)
I particularly enjoyed reading this account of one of the greatest days in our club's proud history. As one of what must have been around 20,000 Hibs fans to make the journey to Gorgie on that famous day, I found Brack's description of the game itself riveting. We may have one of the worst derby records in world football and have suffered countless humiliations at the hands of Hearts, not least recently, but there can be little doubt that 1/1/73 was the biggest derby of all time - far more important than the recent Scottish Cup final, for example. Another great feature of Brack's book is the historical background he provides on the club, from our being the first Scottish club to participate in Europe after others had turned down the invitation to being the first to wear the green to being the first to have floodlights - it's all there. His style and pace are entirely appropriate to the subject matter and I would heartily recommend this book to any Hibs fans who may still be a little down in the mouth after 19/5/12.
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1 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars could have been better, 16 Oct. 2012
This review is from: The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7 (Hardcover)
the book itself would be a great read for any hibs fan as its not easy supporting the green and white army. I wasnt at the game but thi allows me to feel as though i was and enjoy the moment. only downside to the book is it didnt end with the story telling of how we won the scottish cup in may 2012, if only rudi skacel played for hibs the story may have ended differently
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The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7
The Game on New Year's Day: Hearts 0, Hibs 7 by Ted Brack (Hardcover - 1 Oct. 2012)
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