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on 1 March 2014
A Scots language translation of The Twits - this is jist braw. The weans in ma cless ur luvin it - they haud their wheesht and use their lugs weel to hear the tale. If ye need a story fur yer weans in Scots, this is yin tae git.
(trans - this is just great. The children in my class are loving it - they quietly sit and listen to the story. If you need a story in Scots for your kids, this is the one to get.)
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on 25 February 2011
The Ejits is even better in Scots - we loved the Shooglie-Wooglie Bird and somehow, Mr and Mrs Shrunkleheid seem EVEN worse! If you've a Scots tongue, you'll love it. If you havenae, its a crackin place to start. So go track doon a copy an get readin, an jist watch what jinks they wee puggies get up tae! P.s. Tis only a wee book - you could almost read it at one sittin.
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on 17 April 2012
One of the funniest books I have come across. The translation into Scots is inspired. We were hysterical with laughter when reading it aloud. If you love the Scots language you will love this!
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on 4 January 2011
I have read this book to my nephew and we thought it very funny and I would buy more Roald Dahl
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on 28 July 2015
EEJITS - sooooo apt!!!!!!. Believe it or not - the DOG ATE THE BOOK. Oh how I wanted that excuse to cover me when I was at school!!!! I gave this book to my boyfriend, & yes, the dog ate the book.... But - HE SAID THAT IT WAS A GREAT BOOK (the bit he read before the dog...)
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on 13 May 2009
it is a funny book to begin with and you fancy reading about Mr and Mrs Twit in Scottish then this book is for you.
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on 5 January 2014
The Twits is my fave children's story ever. I bought this as a gift for a Scottish friend and I hope she will live this version as much as I love the original. The story is brill and I am sure it still is in any language!
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on 20 August 2015
Bought this for my daughter and she loved it. It has been passed around the house for all to read so its ideal for young and old. Liked so much, bought another Roald Dahl book translated by Matthew Fitt.
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on 13 January 2014
My son loved Roald Dahl. He nows lives outwith Scotland with his English wife and baby daughter. The Eejits is a perfect example of Granny's home language. Bravo! See also the Gruffallo in Scots.
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on 29 November 2012
This is a translation from English into Scots of Roald Dahl's story The Twits.

Firstly, being a children's story, the level of language is such that it is not necessary to be fluent in Scots to understand it, a good familiarity being sufficient.

The quality of the translation, however, raises questions in my mind. There are many instances where the language simply does not sound authentic. For example, the words "glower" and "slaister" are used differently from the way I used them as a child. In addition, the vocabulary used comes across as a mish-mash of words from places as far apart as the Shetlands, Dundee, Aberdeenshire and Ayrshire. The effect of all this is to make me wonder if the translator, Mr Fitt, learned his Scots at university i.e. from books, rather than from being a native speaker i.e. from having spoken Scots (or a modified form of Scots) at home as a child.

(The lack of authenticity that I detected may, of course, be more than a blip. What may be happening is that since Scots has largely been forgotten, its re-introduction into schools is resulting in its being taught like a foreign language i.e. being taught in a standardised form by non-native speakers. Thus we may, in fact, be seeing the emergence of a sort of "BBC" Scots.)

Having said the above, the emergence of books translated into Scots is welcome. Many a school child has suffered abuse under the tyranny of the middle-classes by being required to "speak properly" i.e. in "BBC English" at the expense of their natural tongue, dialect or accent etc.. This abuse is then continued into adulthood and employment, especially into the professions, where deviation from an externally imposed linguistic standard is generally discouraged. This descent into a linguistic monoculture impoverishes both one's own mind as well as the wider cultural environment. The re-emergence of languages such as Scots is, therefore, crucial. Monoculture impoverishes and kills. Diversity enriches and enlivens.
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