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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bookend to 'relational asthetic's'.
Claire Bishops (seven years in the collating and making) 'Artificial Hell's' (a term coined by André Breton) has come at a time when the enthused embers of Bourriad's 'relational aesthetics' are becoming distant memories, yet the relevance and continuing popularity of 'relational' / 'participatory' art/practice continues. Bishop neatly draws a line under...
Published 22 months ago by Peeka-Boo!

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars journalistic but you kind of have to read it
Claire Bishop is so central to the public / participation thang that you kind of have to read this but Grant Kester is a much better writer. This book has some great bits of info in it but it feels like it is written by a journalist, not an academic. If you liked 'participation (whitechapel)' then this is better but I would say buy Kester instead. Get this out of the...
Published 14 months ago by ELD


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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bookend to 'relational asthetic's'., 15 Sep 2012
This review is from: Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship (Paperback)
Claire Bishops (seven years in the collating and making) 'Artificial Hell's' (a term coined by André Breton) has come at a time when the enthused embers of Bourriad's 'relational aesthetics' are becoming distant memories, yet the relevance and continuing popularity of 'relational' / 'participatory' art/practice continues. Bishop neatly draws a line under Bourriad's 'relational aesthetics' and outlines a more critical assessment of 'participatory' art that is resolved early on. This distinction makes Artificial Hells lucid, informed and highly accessible, Bishops observations, historical apprasial, case studies and skepticism on the development and role of 'participatory art' whilst not exhaustive will certainly give artists, curators, critics and students plenty of food for thought. And I'm sure Bishop's flare for healthy critical skepticism will see plenty of revised editions to come.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Covers the ground, 12 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship (Paperback)
Worth having as reference for social engagement aspects of BA Fine Art study. Historical perspective including some images, makes it all less daunting.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars journalistic but you kind of have to read it, 5 May 2013
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This review is from: Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship (Paperback)
Claire Bishop is so central to the public / participation thang that you kind of have to read this but Grant Kester is a much better writer. This book has some great bits of info in it but it feels like it is written by a journalist, not an academic. If you liked 'participation (whitechapel)' then this is better but I would say buy Kester instead. Get this out of the library!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bonding book with my undergrad daughter, 23 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship (Paperback)
My daughter's enthusiasm for this book inspired my purchase. We will read a chapter and then discuss our views on the content (and probably disagree!) I study Psychology based practices and to be fair, there is a huge overlap in this book. Contextual and accurate if not highly individually opinionated. Sharing a read with another is far more fulfilling and Claire Bishop encourages the participatory aspect of art....is reading not art in itself? rty reading this in tandem with another.
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