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4.0 out of 5 stars a very sad story.
what a sad story about greed and evil.this is about a loving couple who wanted to look forward to a great retirement , but evil took over.
Published 11 months ago by mr harvey jones

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reporting Crime?
Danny Collins set the tone for this book in the foreword when he wrote, "The O'Malley story had to be told and I was the only one who could tell it. I owed a debt to two people I had never met." He still does because this book is as much about Collins as it is about the O'Malleys. Collins prides himself on being an investigative journalist which makes his inaccurate claim...
Published on 22 Aug 2010 by Neutral


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reporting Crime?, 22 Aug 2010
By 
Neutral "Phil" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Nightmare in the Sun (Hardcover)
Danny Collins set the tone for this book in the foreword when he wrote, "The O'Malley story had to be told and I was the only one who could tell it. I owed a debt to two people I had never met." He still does because this book is as much about Collins as it is about the O'Malleys. Collins prides himself on being an investigative journalist which makes his inaccurate claim that Anthony O'Malley's birthplace of Widnes is a suburb of Liverpool surprising. This may seem a minor point to raise but, given that Collins was critical of the O'Malleys being presented as a Welsh couple, he should have checked his facts first.

At the time of their deaths the O'Malleys lived in Llangollen, a small market town in North Wales, traditionally visited by many people from the Cheshire and Merseyside areas. They moved there after selling a property further up the Horseshoe Pass which provided them with a mortgage free home and enough to buy a place in the sun. In 2002 they travelled to Benidorm to bid for a property at auction. They never returned. It transpired they had decided to purchase a very cheap property in the town of Alcoy in Spain which had been advertised in the local press. Unbeknown to them the people proposing to sell the property were only renting it and had lured them to the area in order to rob them of their savings. After forcing Anthony O'Malley to empty his bank account, the killers murdered the couple and buried them in the cellar of the house they had gone to view.

When the O'Malleys did not return to Britain and their bank account was emptied their family raised the alarm. The North Wales police became involved and launched their own enquiry. According to Collins it was the North Wales police who collected the evidence required to convict the murderers while the Spanish police were dilatory at best and incompetant at worst. He heaps praise on the North Wales police and blame on their Spanish counterparts. In fact, he has very little time for the Spanish police who he seems to regard as the arm of the State which they were under Franco. Indeed, there are times when he gives the impression of disliking all Spanish institutions and, to some extent, Spaniards. Although he provides many useful guidelines to crime in Spain, as well as some of the practices of journalists everywhere, his story, particularly that part dealing with the five day ordeal suffered by the O'Malleys before they were murdered, appears to be fictional and speculative. As this is in the opening chapters of the book it tends to undermine his overall credibility.

Parts of the story are true, particularly the tracing and capture of the two Venezuelans who had commited the murders. This may not have happened had they not tried to extract monies from the family six months after the killing. They were toppled by technology. One was sent to prison for 59 years, the other for 57. The question of the killers' alleged human rights appears not to have arisen. Collins's local knowledge is invaluable in understanding why things happen (or do not happen) in Spain, including the main differences between British and Spanish arrangements for the examination of the bodies of people who die in suspicious circumstances. Yet the greatest suspicion is that Collins has his own agenda and has produced a mixture of truth, fiction and payback. In sum it's a potboiler written for Collins's own benefit to show he's a good investigative journalist.

As with all semi-authentic potboilers the story ends with unanswered questions. Collins puts forward the view that there were two other people involved in the killing. He knows who they are and where they live but doesn't share that information with his readers. As they appear to live in England while Collins is resident in Spain one wonders why he is so reluctant to name names. The O'Malley family come out of the story with credit. As one of the convicted men left the courtroom he heard his name shouted. Turning, he saw the O'Malley family each holding a picture of the persons he had murdered. They preserved their dignity, he went to jail.

Collins said he owed a debt to the O'Malleys. This volume has done nothing to reduce that debt and is only awarded two stars. They deserved a better account of their deaths than Collins gives.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars one mans view as a tabloid journalist, 25 Oct 2012
By 
This review is from: Nightmare in the Sun (Hardcover)
I have read this book many times as the daughter of the O'Malley's.
This book gives the view of a journalist.Danny did give much help and support to our family by keeping the story In the news.the book has a good account of the truth but as previous reviews there are many incorrect accounts and details regarding our family.The first chapter in the book is Danny's imagination and speculation of the evidence in the public domain.
Thank you for your reviews and warm regards.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating case and some interesting insights, 9 April 2009
By 
Stracs "Stracs" (Leeds, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Nightmare in the Sun (Hardcover)
"Nightmare in the Sun" tells the disturbing story of the mysterious disappearance of Anthony and Linda O'Malley from North Wales whilst hunting for a retirement home in Benidorm, the subsequent police investigation (or lack of in the Spanish police's case) and the discovery of their bodies, right through to the trial of those responsible. The case made headlines in the UK at the time of the couple's disppearance as well as making the BBC's Crimewatch, and was an intriguing case right from the start so I was keen to read this book when it was released.

The author, Danny Collins, was and remains an investigative journalist working in Spain who took up the O'Malley case when they disappeared. His position of being "on the scene" and aware of the Spanish legal system does give him an interesting perspective. He is able to give the inside track on the attitude of Spanish police to cases of missing expats such as the O'Malleys and thus explain their lack of action. He also seems to have good contacts with the Welsh police, who were rather quicker to react to the couple's disappearance and conduct a committed investigation.

Shocking facts are revealed here that should worry potential expats in Spain, such as the fact that all the evidence presented against the murderers at their trial was collated by the Welsh police, not the Spanish. Also revealed is how the killers were finally caught, largely thanks to the ingenuity of the Welsh Police and the wise actions of the UK charity Missing People.

Whilst the actual story and case facts to be told here is very interesting, the writing of the book really lets it down for me. The book starts off with a number of chapters where what happens to the couple is almost fictionalised, so for example we here their conversations with the killers and each other, and we hear their own thoughts on their situation. This is of course all pure speculation and for me really takes away from the book rather than adding to it. I much prefer true crime books to stick to what is known or provable, rather than going off into storytelling in this manner.

The book seems also to lack any real structure. The same material is regurgitated and repeated in different chapters far more than necessary, and the chronological order of the book makes very little sense to me, jumping back and forwards in the timeline and making it confusing. The author also seems to be using the book to forward a personal agenda. He outlines in great detail his own investigations into this and other missing persons cases in Spain and his contacts with psychics about the case. To be fair he doesn't claim the psychics or himself resolved the case, but he does seems at points to be singing his own praises and giving the only impression he was the only investigator actively looking for the O'Malleys.

The author also seems to be using the book to advance his criticisms of the Spanish police. Of course their investgation was, to put it mildly, inept but the author goes on and on with the same criticisms of the Spanish investigators, repeating the same points over and over to the point where you begin to feel his gripe against them is actually very personal.

For these reasons I found this book a real mixed bag. It was very interesting to read a book on the case and find out the storyof what happened to the O'Malleys, but the actual quality of the writing of the book really let it down for me.
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4.0 out of 5 stars a very sad story., 27 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Nightmare in the Sun (Hardcover)
what a sad story about greed and evil.this is about a loving couple who wanted to look forward to a great retirement , but evil took over.
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Nightmare in the Sun
Nightmare in the Sun by Danny Collins (Hardcover - 1 Oct 2007)
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