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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For once, an excellent Horus Heresy novel
To describe this book as simply a Space Wolves novel, is to describe the Atlantic Ocean as a pool of water. This book is so much more, and the parts I found most interesting were the parts not about the Spave Wolves at all. Written from the perspective of Kasper Hawser, who starts as a Conservator of the Terran Unification Council and ends with him becoming a Skjald of...
Published 21 months ago by Mr. Ri Extall

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven, but sublime in places
I think the highest compliment we can pay to Dan Abnett is that nobody will ever write the Space Wolves the same after this contribution. He has shone so much light on them, and enriched their background so much that we'll never see them the same again. The Wolves come across as barbaric but noble, intelligent and savage, animalistic and yet also deeply aware and...
Published on 24 April 2011 by A. Lau


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For once, an excellent Horus Heresy novel, 20 Jan 2013
By 
Mr. Ri Extall (Nottingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
To describe this book as simply a Space Wolves novel, is to describe the Atlantic Ocean as a pool of water. This book is so much more, and the parts I found most interesting were the parts not about the Spave Wolves at all. Written from the perspective of Kasper Hawser, who starts as a Conservator of the Terran Unification Council and ends with him becoming a Skjald of The Rout (The Space Wolves name for themselves), this books tells a great deal of the past history of Terra. From the Golden Age to the Age of Strife, through the Darkness which followed to the Unification Wars on Terra.

This is probably the most enjoyable book of the Horus Heresy series I have read so far, and probably the best 'Space Marine' novel I have read to date. In my mind, this novel proves one thing; Dab Abnett is a master story-teller and the undisputed master of his craft.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A three dimensional take on what would have been more hollow shouting and howling in the hands of another., 9 Mar 2013
By 
A. Stimpson "Rabid Consumer" (Hullborea) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
When the series is getting bogged down in shallow characterisation and turgid prose you can always rely on Abnett to give it a shot in the arm and here he has done so once again. The usual recipe of stoic, navel-gazing Astartes, quirky remembrancers that fancy each other and superhuman battling and shouting is swept away in Prospero Burns in favour of a quite exhilarating narrative that gives possibly the most complete and humanistic impression of a Space Marine legion (and associated foibles) that I have read to date, as well as a rare glimpse into the state of Terran society circa 30k.

With the exception of Dembski-Bowden's excellent First Heretic I confess that I have found the series hard going of late, with even Graham MacNeill's later entries (Mechanicum and The Thousand Sons) struggling to capture the fresh and distinctive tone of his earlier and better effort, Fulgrim.

Abnett has shaken the formula once again and given me cause to continue.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great audio book to enjoy, 28 April 2012
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
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I love an audio book but when you normally get them, they story has been slashed to the nuts and bolts to keep it down to a certain length and as such a lot of the detail is usually missing. So I was very happy when I learned that the Black Library was bringing some of the Horus Heresy titles to the fore to allow readers to feel the full force of battles both on the field as well as within the minds of men without having to cut anything out.

As with the other Black Library audio books it is fun, it has the full on flavour of the Dark Future universe and of course the characters within will remain within the readers mind for quite some time to come. (In fact I dare you to read any Horus Heresy titles after listening and not place the vocals to the characters.) Add to this a foreboding sense throughout due to background atmospheric music alongside cracking talent reading the tale and you know that its going to be a gem. Great stuff.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyed this one, 15 Sep 2014
This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
Really enjoyed this one, as a huge Space Wolf fan I wasnt let down at all. Thought it gave a real nice impression of who and what the Wolves are. I don't want to give anything away but could have had more Russ involvement but that really doesn't take away from the fact that I really liked it. Again If you like the Space Wolves I would give it a go thats for sure. I know I was eagerly awaiting this book on release date as I had already read A Thousand Sons.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great addition to the line, 9 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
A very good addition to the horus heresy line i couldnt put it down. What fury the space wolves have.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, 22 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
Prospero Burns is a good sci-fi book, and great warhammer 40k novel. It is a bit slow at times, but all and all it provieds a good read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A present, 6 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
Cannot say much about this as it was a present for my Grandson apparently it was just what he wanted
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not what it says on the tin, 24 Oct 2012
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G. Eliav - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
I found the book incredibly slow and took a long time for the main plot to start, even for a Horus Heresy book. Was extremely disappointed to discover this book is not told through the eyes of a Space Marine, but a lowly mortal archeologist - but not a cool one like India Jones, more a slightly geeky Channel 4 documentary one. The story itself is not bad, but I really wished it was more obvious what was in it. I buy Space Marine books to read about Space Marines after all...
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5.0 out of 5 stars "The adventures of a scholar among the Wolves" ..., 21 Sep 2012
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
... and not "Prospero Burns". I liked very much this book. It tells the story of a scholar, a man who seeks knowledge. Scholars, various astartes chapters, imperium administration, imperium citizens, chaos followers perceive and use knowledge each in a different way. This is a "politics and war intelligence" story.
The first few chapters tell the adventures of the scholar among the tribes of Fenris people. Later chapters tell his story among the Space Wolves, what he learns about them, his feelings and thoughts, as he joins them in battle and politics. It does not tell the story of Fenris. There are many flash backs, about the life of the scholar in Terra. These are essential for the plot, plus one can learn things about the past and present history of Terra.
I'm not a fun of Horus Heresy because the philosophical issues of astartes make these books hard to read, for me. I've read mostly Space Wolves and Imperial Guard novels. So i can not tell if this is a good or important book in the series. But i liked the quite complex plot and the descriptions of the characters and the environment, from the first until the last page. I give this book 4.5 stars and not 5 because i didnt like the way Wolves treated the natives of Fenris in the first chapters. Abnett things they could do that, i don't. Anyway, they say there are no wolves on Fenris, so maybe Abnett is right.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Uneven, but sublime in places, 24 April 2011
By 
A. Lau (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) (Paperback)
I think the highest compliment we can pay to Dan Abnett is that nobody will ever write the Space Wolves the same after this contribution. He has shone so much light on them, and enriched their background so much that we'll never see them the same again. The Wolves come across as barbaric but noble, intelligent and savage, animalistic and yet also deeply aware and intellectual. Bill King's trilogy is utterly eclipsed.

The first appearance of a space marine in the book is vintage Abnett; an absolutely blazing, cinematic passage that just leaps off the page.

In response to the criticism that he's used too many unusual words, well, isn't it an author's DUTY to introduce us to new words when the time's right? What better word to describe a doughnut-shaped artificially-constructed structure than 'toroid'? Yeah, a few caught me out, but how great to find myself reaching for a dictionary whilst reading such page-turning yarns?

Something I thought was quite successful was the way several uniquely Abnett characters and ideas sparked in previous books came together in this one: the importance/use of names by psykers, Enuncia, the Custodes, the untouchables...

As for the narrator, it makes sense that Dan chose to tell the story through the eyes of an uninitiated third party, a device he's used time and time again to great effect. It's an old writer's trick to help keep the wonder and surprise in narrative, and to ensure the odd nudge and wink can take place between the author and Warhammer-initiated (the 'purring' axe 'licking its lips' at the start of the book is a perfect and brilliant example).

My only quibbles are that the third act, the actual assault on Prospero, is weaker than the preceding two, and Hawser's recollections are passable reading but pale alongside the rip-roaring combat scenes by such an extent that they drag quite badly. And, for goodness's sake, how many 'wet-leopard purs' can a cast of characters utter in one book!?

So, uneven, but an absolutely essential read for anyone who's remotely interested in space marines!
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Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy)
Prospero Burns (The Horus Heresy) by Dan Abnett (Paperback - 5 April 2010)
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