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on 25 May 2006
I have been eagerly anticipating the publication of Brian Todd Carey's WARFARE IN THE MEDIEVAL WORLD and was fortunate to pick up an advanced copy in the UK. This work is a continuation of his excellent WARFARE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD, picking up where his first volume left off. MEDIEVAL WORLD begins with an exploration of Byzantine warfare, then moves on to discuss the rise of heavy cavalry in western Europe during the early and high medieval periods. He then moves on to discuss the crusades in Spain and the Holy Land, as well as the Mongol penetrations in eastern Europe and in the Near East. His book winds down with a discussion of the return of light infantry to European warfare, as well as the rise of heavy infantry like the Swiss. The book ends with a fine chapter discussing the ipact of classical authors on early modern war. Like his volume 1, this work is profusely illustrated with tactical maps and regional maps and brings the combat of the era to life. I highly recommend both of these books for any military historians library.
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on 21 May 2006
I just completed Professor Carey's follow up to his Warfare in the Ancient World. Entitled Warfare in the Medieval World, this second volume continues with a discussion of the tactical relationships between infantry and cavalry on the battlefields of Europe and the Near East. This work begins where his volume one ended, with the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the rise of Byzantium. Here, the author tackles the evolution of Byzantine warfare, then moves on to discuss the rise and dominance of heavy cavalry in western European warfare during the early and high medieval period. The crusades are highlighted, both in the Holy Land and in Spain, while the development of logistics and horsebreeding are also touched upon. Of particular interest was the chapters on Mongol warfare and this steppe people's interaction on Christian Europe and the Islamic Near East. Volume two finishes with coverage of the return of heavy and light cavalry to the battlefields of Europe and the development of firearms and their application to warfare.

I own many of the works cited in this book, and I enjoyed the way Carey synthesizes these works in an enjoyable narrative. When combined with the scores of maps (both tactical and regional), Warfare in the Medieval World is a keeper and a fine addition to any military historian or gamer's library.
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on 3 June 2008
I read with great interest the very positive reviews this book received. However, on finally getting my hands on it, I was disappointed by a surprising number of factual flaws. For example, the Mongols did not lose at the Battle of the River Kalka, the English King Edward IV was not at Crecy, and the description of Crecy itself in terms of the English disposition is incoherent. Aside from some dubious editing, I believe that the problem is that the good professor appears to have used a number of non-primary sources; some of which may have been of uneven quality. The battle descriptions generally follow the conventional wisdom, so there are no surprises there. On the positive side, there is a good attempt at providing an overview of tactical developments through the Middle Ages and the battle maps are very good.
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on 18 February 2013
I have only read the chapter on the Mongol invasion of Eastern Europe. It was complete as it did give the reason for the ending of the Mongol threat, which is the first time I heard that. The chapter concentrates on Mongol tactics at several battles. The last battle they lost mostly due to superior numbers, so less time could have been spent on that battle. The other battles were interesting, but handled somewhat generally. They were all fairly similar. He would have better off going into more detail and covering one battle than to cover several generally.

In summary, the book is easy to read, does probably provide some new information, but it is not top of my reading list. I like a bit denser information.
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on 1 July 2008
A really good book easy to read and informative, cant see how a man like Carey who wrote Ancient world as well ,would get facts wrong as Big Ug says, but i dont know so cant say, I would urge anyone with an historical bent to by this and the Ancient warfare one as well, both are well worth the money,
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on 20 April 2011
It is a good book. Has description of many battles, with diagrams. But do not advise anyone looking for a book describing the military equipment used in various eras. It not has drawings (or photos) on weapons, armor and other military equipment.
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